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Old 02-12-2019, 10:58 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by o1marc View Post
Not to dissuade you from your decision, but you might want to see some of this and be better informed.
Cute videos! On video #1, I don't see the information that says this is collision related, or that the propane was stored on the outside wall of the RV. If these are factory built RVs it's almost for sure that their tanks were underneath and were not portable tanks. The RV is on the lot of an RV dealer - you can tell that from both the video and the poster's comment below it, where he says he no longer works there.

You can clearly see on video #2 that there are no propane tanks on the visible exterior of the RV, and the fire is entirely in the front. It appears to have started INSIDE the RV, which would be indicative of a propane leak.

IN video #3, the guy pulls in with the gas pouring out of the tank, but it does not ignite until he approaches. How much do you want to bet that dude was smoking a cigarette?

None of these explosions were caused by collision. These videos are a great way of dissuading someone from using propane at all, but they don't have anything to do with where the tanks are placed.

The only reason NOT to put the tanks on the back (besides worrying about getting a ticket) is if you're worried about direct collision impact. Where I'd put the tank is roughly 5 feet off the ground. Not a lot of vehicles have fronts that tall, which makes the odds of that collision rather slim.

How about some videos of vehicles going up in flames because their gas tanks were impacted in a collision? There's a hell of a lot more of those accidents, but they're so common I doubt anyone is even bothering to post them on YouTube.

I like safety. I am truly a fan of safety, fire safety in particular. But this is just not that issue.
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Old 02-12-2019, 11:36 PM   #42
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remember that propane is heavier than air and any leaking propane 'falls' as it spreads - I've thought about carrying propane on the top of my truck box, but decided it would be safer carried down low in case it leaked and filled my box if it leaked
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Old 02-12-2019, 11:36 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by 1olfart View Post
I've often thought some sort of a "lift" would work for propane tanks. It shouldn't be too difficult to add a hand, (or powered) crank to a platform, that would raise things above a level that would be in a "crash zone" I understand that weight would limit you, to some degree, but being able to raise propane tanks, and even a generator, would also be a way to better protect things.
Thoughts?
There are lots of people storing propane on roof racks, so they'd probably love this idea.
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Old 02-12-2019, 11:56 PM   #44
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BTW, the requirement for mounting underneath is that if they are placed between the front and rear axles they can't be lower than the front axel, and if placed behind the rear axle they can't be lower than the lowest point of the frame behind them, or of the rear axle, whichever is higher. The measurement for clearance has to be take from the bottom of the tank or mount, whatever the lowest point is.
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Old 02-13-2019, 06:37 AM   #45
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Any chance you could mount it outside, but disconnect it and bring it inside when traveling? Not an ideal compromise, maybe, but it's worth considering.
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Old 02-13-2019, 07:56 AM   #46
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Any chance you could mount it outside, but disconnect it and bring it inside when traveling? Not an ideal compromise, maybe, but it's worth considering.
Well, I'm still deciding whether this would be hooked up to anything to be disconnected from, anyway. The original idea was to store the big cylinder on the outside and use it for filling the legally refillable 1# cylinders - not the little green ones that people fill illegally, but ones designed for that purpose. I would then have a pound of propane inside at any given time, which is not illegal. The only thing using propane at this point, anyway, is the water heater.

As far as bringing it in when traveling, that would defeat the whole purpose of putting it outside.

I'm looking into the possibility of creating a recessed area in that same spot, so it doesn't stick out at all. This apparently makes it legal to carry it there. Basically, this is like the vault people have been talking about, except it doesn't connect to inside. Or maybe it does, I'm not sure yet. Just trying to figure out how to do this with my limited skills.
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Old 02-13-2019, 08:40 AM   #47
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I would then have a pound of propane inside at any given time, which is not illegal. The only thing using propane at this point, anyway, is the water heater.

As far as bringing it in when traveling, that would defeat the whole purpose of putting it outside.
Ah, I see. I hadn't realized it was a legal issue to have a larger propane tank inside, I always figured it was a space or safety issue (leaky regulator or whatnot). I had envisioned an external tank being connected to a piping system that feeds your propane appliances, and some sort of quick-disconnect at the exterior mounting bracket of your bus.
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Old 02-13-2019, 11:12 AM   #48
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I've been trying to come up with a way to do my rear-window propane storage "cage" seeing how I don't weld and don't have access to anyone who welds. In my quest for the low tech solution I can do myself i came across what looks like an option, but I don't really know if it's workable.

Do you think a bracket like this:
https://www.amazon.com/Nashfuel-Univ...gateway&sr=8-1

Could be bolted on the back of the bus - over the spot where the little side window now is? (see image)

And then covered with something like this:
https://www.campingworld.com/heavy-d...lack?rrec=true

Would that be a safe, acceptable solution? I'm probably not looking to connect it from there to anywhere else, I would use it to refill smaller bottles (the legally refillable ones, not the little green one pounders).



I would do this method and mount a second frame on the left hand window too.
Make two signs, one says FULL, one says EMPTY.
Put the tank in the one that says EMPTY and leave the left hand side marked FULL without a bottle.
I mean if you are going to be given a ticket, might as well make it worthwhile.
I'm assuming you would only need these tanks when travelling and not in everyday local driving which would be the more dangerous of these two scenarios.
That's me but I have little respect for authorities of any kind at any time, especially revenue collectors disguised as cops other police state characters.


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Old 02-13-2019, 12:39 PM   #49
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That's me but I have little respect for authorities of any kind at any time, especially revenue collectors disguised as cops other police state characters.


John
LOL! I am generally respectful but when laws don't make sense I get a bit pissed off.
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Old 02-13-2019, 03:33 PM   #50
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I don't have a shorty got a 07 international 37 ' I put a 8" skirt on the bottom of the bus and that allowed 2 20 lbs. Propane tanks standing up under the bus
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Old 02-13-2019, 03:37 PM   #51
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I don't have a shorty got a 07 international 37 ' I put a 8" skirt on the bottom of the bus and that allowed 2 20 lbs. Propane tanks standing up under the bus
If they are lower than the axle, they're not any more legal than having them on the back wall. An 8" skirt on the bottom of my bus would make it an absolute nightmare trying to drive anywhere but a perfectly flat, perfectly paved road.
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Old 02-13-2019, 03:50 PM   #52
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Here's a picture of the cabinet
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Old 02-13-2019, 03:51 PM   #53
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Well that puts my tanks higher than the diesel tank that is under it
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Old 02-13-2019, 04:00 PM   #54
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Here's a picture of the cabinet
Pretty similar to where ours are located. We put them at the front edge, away from the tires, in case we have a blow-out.
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Old 02-13-2019, 04:03 PM   #55
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Not lower than front axle or existing diesel tank under bus
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Old 02-13-2019, 04:06 PM   #56
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And my front door hangs down that much and more so if I hit that then I know i'm in trouble. Gives me 20' to respond. Put them close to rear tires so if bump on road i'm starting to climb it soon... dead in the middle will cause hitting most bumps with stuff
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Old 02-13-2019, 04:10 PM   #57
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Ok guys this was my first time in the forums and I even did a picture and i'm on my cell phone so hopefully you enjoyed my input... hope I did it right not sure how all this works but I been reading you guys stuff for over a year figured it was time I chimed in.
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Old 02-13-2019, 05:51 PM   #58
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Well that puts my tanks higher than the diesel tank that is under it
Never mind, just read your response that it's not below the axle.
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Old 02-13-2019, 05:51 PM   #59
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Ok guys this was my first time in the forums and I even did a picture and i'm on my cell phone so hopefully you enjoyed my input... hope I did it right not sure how all this works but I been reading you guys stuff for over a year figured it was time I chimed in.
You did great!
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Old 02-13-2019, 07:27 PM   #60
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I know the OP was about short bus, but thought I would post another option for propane location on a bus. I have storage everywhere except where the fuel tank is on the right, and the last 8' on the right rear that houses the exhaust pipe. I cut the exhaust off between the 2 bends and then again about 18" further down the line. I can take that elbow I cut off and turn it 180°and it exits straight out the side about 1.5' behind the wheel. I removed the 2 pipe changes and freed up that whole space for the 29.3 gallon propane tank. Bolting right to cross ribs couldn't have made this any easier.
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