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Old 05-23-2018, 06:28 PM   #21
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Western Oregon
Posts: 875
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Blue-Bird
Chassis: TC RE 3408
Engine: 5.9 Cummins 12V Mechanical/Allison MT643
Rated Cap: Blue-Bird says 72 pass.
Unless you were running the stove pretty much wide open, you can pretty much count on what you describe dripping creosote even from dry wood, because it would have too many elbows and probably not enough vertical rise.
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Old 05-23-2018, 09:36 PM   #22
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Ontario Canada
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Just a thought, but have you investigated a small Pellet Stove? They throw a lot of heat, even the smallest. You can control the burn, and some look quite nice. Also, they don't have the mess associated with wood.
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Old 05-23-2018, 10:59 PM   #23
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
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Year: 1995
Coachwork: Blue-Bird
Chassis: TC RE 3408
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Rated Cap: Blue-Bird says 72 pass.
Almost all pellet stoves are complicated contraptions with electrical powered augers to feed the pellets into the firebox and blowers to circulate the heat. I did watch a demonstration video of the Wiseway stove, which can also be found on Youtube, and found it very impressive. It uses no electricity at all and has no moving parts except for a hand operated draft control

However, it's quite large, and I think the heat output would probably be too much for all but the largest buses in extremely cold climates. It's rated at 800 to 2000 square feet.

I intend to write Wiseway and encourage them to develop a smaller model that would be suitable for buses and cabins, etc. I have not yet done that, but when I do I will make a post about it here and encourage any others who maybe interested in a non-electric pellet stove to contact them as well.

I have not yet posted any links on this forum and so don't now how this will work, but here goes.

This first link is to Wiseway's website. It includes contact info for their main dealer in Grants Pass OR and links to their user manual and the patent they hold, and also a link to an archived copy of their previous website.

Wiseway Non-Electric Pellet Stove - Home

This second link is to a page that has brief reviews of the Wiseway stove and their four competitors in the field of non-electric pellet stoves. It includes links to all the various companies' websites. Wiseway is the only one which is UL certified, but that mostly matters only if you want to get insurance on a building one of their stoves is installed in.

Non Electric Pellet Stove
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Old 05-24-2018, 01:42 AM   #24
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Year: 2000
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A small rocket stove can be gravity feed pellets from a pipe connected to a 5gal water jug full of pellets, it burns for days in a small one

I'll see if I can find the pictures, I saw it on YouTube and built one just to play with
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Old 05-24-2018, 03:06 AM   #25
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Western Oregon
Posts: 875
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Blue-Bird
Chassis: TC RE 3408
Engine: 5.9 Cummins 12V Mechanical/Allison MT643
Rated Cap: Blue-Bird says 72 pass.
That sounds very interesting. I would love to see that.

And I understand wood pellets are good to use for "flushing" compost toilets. I've read you just put some in a bucket with a little water and they apparently fall apart and then you've got a bucket full of moist sawdust to add to the compost.
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Old 05-24-2018, 03:11 AM   #26
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Western Oregon
Posts: 875
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Blue-Bird
Chassis: TC RE 3408
Engine: 5.9 Cummins 12V Mechanical/Allison MT643
Rated Cap: Blue-Bird says 72 pass.
I just did a search for "rocket stove" "wood pellets" "gravity feed" and found several interesting videos to check out tomorrow after I get a little sleep.

Thanks very much for the suggestion, Whatthefak.
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Old 05-25-2018, 11:39 AM   #27
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Might look at marine versions. Some are very small and efficient, and warm a sailboat interior without a problem. All issues are considered including tight spaces, fumes, venting, CO, etc.
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Old 05-25-2018, 12:11 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gs1949 View Post
I just did a search for "rocket stove" "wood pellets" "gravity feed" and found several interesting videos to check out tomorrow after I get a little sleep.

Thanks very much for the suggestion, Whatthefak.
No problem, most use a welded stainless grill cage to hold the burning pellets. Mine was just a test run so I used the expanded steel screen like to keep birds out of a chimney. It worked the same it just burns through eventually. I put alot of hours on it and left it outside in the rain and snow. It never actually failed but I could see it starting, for the price and ease of Fab I'd do the same again.
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Old 05-25-2018, 01:17 PM   #29
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Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Western Oregon
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Chassis: TC RE 3408
Engine: 5.9 Cummins 12V Mechanical/Allison MT643
Rated Cap: Blue-Bird says 72 pass.
So did you hook this up to a flue inside your bus or was it used like a campstove outside?

I'd rather carry pellets than either propane or liquid camp stove fuel. My interest in alternate fuels is driven by a strong desire not to have propane installed in my bus. I want it to be all electric.

I might end up carrying propane to use outside in a camp stove or a barbeque, but in that case the propane would be stored in a well ventilated storage cabinet on the outside rear of the bus. And if I could find another way to occasionally boil big pots full of water without propane or having to haul or gather firewood, I would certainly consider that instead of carrying propane.
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Old 05-25-2018, 02:05 PM   #30
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I just built it as a test it was only ever in my back yard but it was piped with a flue like I would if I had it inside. I would probably put an intake for outside air if I put one in a bus. They suck a large amount of air in when burning, better it's cool outside air than already heated inside air
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Old 05-25-2018, 05:14 PM   #31
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Western Oregon
Posts: 875
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Blue-Bird
Chassis: TC RE 3408
Engine: 5.9 Cummins 12V Mechanical/Allison MT643
Rated Cap: Blue-Bird says 72 pass.
I agree, unless the heat output was too much for the bus and tended to overheat it, then it might be better to let the combustion air infiltrate wherever it could and help prevent the bus from overheating.

That is unless the bus was very quite tight then an external intake for combustion air would be very important.
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Old 05-25-2018, 06:46 PM   #32
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For the fellow who mentioned railroad caboose stoves have a nice ride, well not really. As a locomotive engineer myself the poor caboose takes a good bit of a beating. What we call "slack action" can really jerk a train car and the caboose being at the end gets it the worst. What happens is as the loco starts moving each coupler has some "slack" or movement to it, so each car starts moving in turn after the slack is pulled up. So as you can see 50 cars back the caboose can get quite a hard jolt. I have seen it jump the wheels just a bit off the track. The stoves are quite tough and also well bolted down.

By the way modern freight cars have cushioned couplers, and passenger cars have have them as well so as to not jerk the passengers about so much. Plus a good engineer will pull easy until his whole train is moving, then he can really put some power to it.
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Old 05-26-2018, 04:21 PM   #33
Almost There
 
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wood stove.

i built a platform, and used cement board for a surround and over the subfloor. Then covered it in some decortlative stainless panels for the sides that have an air gap behind them, and i used slate stone tile for the floor.

i appologize for the mess. im in the works of many projects.

the logic behind it being up front is the giant windows and door are leaky. and i wanted to makenit easy to.come in and warm up without wrecking the whole floor. it can get a bit chili in the back if im. not running it full blast though. however, i dont think a smaller bus will have such a hard time with that.

to manage the heat distrobution, i simply turn my roof unit on low. i hooked up some 4" pvc drain pipe to it to make it distribute more efficiently and de-restrict the airflow. this keeps the heat nice and even. 😀
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Old 05-26-2018, 05:12 PM   #34
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4 window? You’ll be sweating.
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Old 05-26-2018, 10:06 PM   #35
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Anyone using those stove top fans?

I forget what they are called, they operate on heat they turn into electricity
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Old 05-26-2018, 11:41 PM   #36
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Location: Greater Houston, Tx.
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Look at the Gstove. It comes in 3 sizes and has some cool options, one of which is a heat driven fan. The smaller one may be your best option, but I don't think it comes with a window.
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Old 05-27-2018, 11:10 AM   #37
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It's not as nice, but amazon has gasoline car heaters for $500.
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Old 05-29-2018, 10:46 AM   #38
Mini-Skoolie
 
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There is this place in isanti Mn that specializes in small wood stoves. There called fourdogwoodstove.com i would recommend the 3 dog for that small of a space
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Old 05-30-2018, 06:07 PM   #39
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Quote:
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There is this place in isanti Mn that specializes in small wood stoves. There called fourdogwoodstove.com i would recommend the 3 dog for that small of a space
is it this site?
http://fourdogstove.com/
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Old 05-30-2018, 06:45 PM   #40
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Dickinson makes a wood fuel heater for marine use, that's designed to be mounted on the wall.


https://www.amazon.com/Dickinson-Mar...on+wood+heater


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