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Old 09-12-2016, 12:41 PM   #41
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I put a cubic mini in a 37 foot sailboat. works if you can feed it dry hard wood every 30 minutes. and you sit in front of it. Over all it would not be a good single heat source. I'm looking for any good wood stoves for a 38 foot bus. I'm hoping to find something with some burn time so i don't have to wake up in the middle of the night, but also won't get burned out with to much heat. I don't want to go to small becuase even though i insulated I still have most of the original windows. I think that they are going to be cold and drafty this winter. Have you found a stove that works?

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Old 12-16-2016, 10:35 AM   #42
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I had been looking at the larger cubicmini but then starting looking at importing a stove from england. This is the current one im considering.

Saltfire ST1 Wood burning stove with liner kit options | eBay

Significanlty larger than the mini but still not huge.

Dimensions are 19.5 h x 17w x 12 deep. just over a 100lbs
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Old 12-19-2016, 10:57 AM   #43
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That st-1 is a nice looking little stove. It seems like it would be a pretty decent size for a bus. I don't understand why we can import a small wood stove from England for almost literally half the price of a domestically produced tiny stove... If I ever have 500 bucks to blow on a new stove I may just get one of these st-1s...
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Old 12-19-2016, 11:50 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by slaughridge85 View Post
That st-1 is a nice looking little stove. It seems like it would be a pretty decent size for a bus. I don't understand why we can import a small wood stove from England for almost literally half the price of a domestically produced tiny stove... If I ever have 500 bucks to blow on a new stove I may just get one of these st-1s...
Well I tried..... I found a pretty good looking stove that I thought would be a good fit for someone who wants a little bit larger stove for $553. I went to get the link to post here and found that the price has gone up over $100... Bummer.

Well maybe it will go on sale again?

Wood Burning Stove with Storage (50-SVL17) From Summers Heat at Ace Hardware

Also, here is an inexpensive consideration. I would be very careful regarding indoor use though: Survivor Black Bear Portable Wood Stove (12-CSM) - Outdoor Fireplaces - Ace Hardware
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Old 12-19-2016, 12:25 PM   #45
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If you check out CL or farm auctions you can find stoves a lot cheaper, stove on left I paid $100.00, stove on right $80.00

The stove by it's self I paid $80.00, sold it for $800.00
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Old 01-05-2017, 06:11 PM   #46
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Hey everybody! For those using wood heat, I'm curious how you ran your stove pipe/chimney set up. I'm shopping stove pipe pieces right now and the cost is quickly adding up!

Side note: we plan on running ours out through a removable window panel, not a permanent structure.

...would love some ideas!
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Old 01-05-2017, 07:02 PM   #47
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Now- I'm in a tropical climate so take my advice for what its worth.
But you really should run it straight up. Then make a removable cap for when you aren't using it or are driving. Others who have actually seen it snow will chime in with better opinions.
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Old 01-05-2017, 07:57 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by rjnye79 View Post
Hey everybody! For those using wood heat, I'm curious how you ran your stove pipe/chimney set up. I'm shopping stove pipe pieces right now and the cost is quickly adding up!

Side note: we plan on running ours out through a removable window panel, not a permanent structure.

...would love some ideas!
If you are going to run the stove pipe out the window it should be pretty easy.
Just make a metal plate ( tin/ sheet metal) to fit the window opening and run your stove pipe through the middle of it.
No need to get crazy ( and expensive) with insulated pipe.
You might want to make a bracket to keep the outside pipe from tipping. Just something light that could hook in the rain gutter and go around the pipe.
Keep it simple.
Keep it safe.
Show us pictures when you're done.
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Old 01-05-2017, 09:49 PM   #49
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Hang onto your hats because this Skoolie cat just figured out how to post pics!

Made this wood stove out of an empty propane tank, inspired by rednic on youtube, which i was going to order from him but then tried my hand and it worked.
Ran the 3" exhsust out the window through a thin sheet of metal as mentioned above. Very simple and means i can move it if things change, mostly my mind.

The 3" stove pipe is air jet and can be ordered from http://www.regionalchimneysupply.com












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Old 01-05-2017, 10:52 PM   #50
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I like your stove.
Can you explain to me, a complete computer illiterate, how to post pictures?
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Old 01-05-2017, 10:53 PM   #51
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I like your stove.
Can you explain to me, a complete computer illiterate, how to post pictures?
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Old 01-05-2017, 11:13 PM   #52
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If you are going to run the stove pipe out the window it should be pretty easy.
Just make a metal plate ( tin/ sheet metal) to fit the window opening and run your stove pipe through the middle of it.
No need to get crazy ( and expensive) with insulated pipe.
You might want to make a bracket to keep the outside pipe from tipping. Just something light that could hook in the rain gutter and go around the pipe.
Keep it simple.
Keep it safe.
Show us pictures when you're done.
So, no worries about the metal plate getting hot and whatnot? Did you use regular stove pipe or chimney pipe?
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Old 01-06-2017, 10:29 AM   #53
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You'll be fine running it out of a window. That's basically what I did, except I've skinned all my windows so it just goes up from the stove, 90s and then goes out the wall, another 90 and then up over the ridge line of the bus.

I've never had a problem with draft. I get good complete burns with seasoned wood and haven't ever had a puff-back situation. Make sure wherever you go through (window or ceiling) you use double or triple wall pipe. There are pics in my build thread.

When on the road I just pull the pipe going through the wall and external chimney, cap the hole and cap the stove and I'm off like a prom dress...
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Old 01-06-2017, 02:19 PM   #54
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A tin sheet the size of the window opening is not likely to get hot enough to cause problems.
It will have enough surface area to stay cool.
If you wanted you could mount a short (6 inch) piece of triple wall chimney to whatever you use in your window opening, then you for sure wouldn't have any trouble.
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Old 01-07-2017, 12:46 PM   #55
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Thanks y'all! I'm also curious, if I use double/triple wall pipe, could I put it through a piece of plywood instead of sheet metal? Is that stupid?
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Old 01-07-2017, 02:41 PM   #56
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Thanks y'all! I'm also curious, if I use double/triple wall pipe, could I put it through a piece of plywood instead of sheet metal? Is that stupid?
I would use two pieces of sheet metal with 1" of mineral/rock wool in between in place of the one window pane.
No need for double and or triple wall sleeve.
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Old 01-07-2017, 08:12 PM   #57
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Thanks y'all! I'm also curious, if I use double/triple wall pipe, could I put it through a piece of plywood instead of sheet metal? Is that stupid?
Wood is unsafe.
I used tin and it doesnt heat much at all.
I like the idea of rockboard between two sheets of metal.

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Old 01-09-2019, 07:17 AM   #58
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Help me understand insulated pipe here folks.


I run cheap black stove pipe.



The whole idea of a woodstove is to produce heat and radiate all that heat.


Why send it up the insulated chimney pipe to the outdoors?


Is it a fear of fire or something?



Sure, it is to be respected but that idea baffles me to no end.


John
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Old 01-09-2019, 07:54 AM   #59
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Insulated pipe is specifically for outdoors, attics, or if the chimney needs to go through an upstairs living area (or goes anywhere that it is easily touched, objects placed against it, etc).

In any installation it is beneficial to use some form of insulated chimney for the exterior portion. The reason being that you want to keep the exhaust gases as hot as possible to maintain a strong draft.
I'm sure we've all seen those residential installations where the chimney is fully exterior and running along the outside wall of the house. Those are worst case scenario. Even with insulated chimney they risk causing a dangerous situation when running the wood stove too cold. The winter cold can cool the chimney exhaust enough that there is next to zero draft and the smoke starts entering the house.

For our buses it's less of a concern since the exterior portions of the chimney are short. If you run it out a window and up it will have more exterior length. Add a 90 degree bend in there and you're greatly inhibiting the pull of the draft. It'll all work, I'm sure, but it'd work better if it were straight out the top. You'd likely have more radiating stove pipe going straight up, too, so more heat entering the living space.
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:53 AM   #60
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you can control the amount of heat loss in a wood stove by sltering the dampers.. .. opening the air and closing down the chimney will usuaslly slow the exhaust flow and the wood burn.. closing dpown the air also controls the wood burn but doesnt dso much to contain the heat...

a lot of people put stack heaters on their wood stoves or heat exchangers..

you could conceivably run a high temperature glycol or oil loop by wrapping copper tubing around the inner wall of a double wall exhaust pipe and then fitting the outer wall on the pipe...

of course doing this means you have to handle the excess heat / pressure in the loop just like any other boiler.. an oil filled loop can be run MUCH hotter but doesnt have quite the transfer capabilities of water or glycol.. but you wont blow yourself up either..

the loop flow would then go to a fan coil someplace which could easily use a small battery powered fan.. (doesnt take much).. which could be charged by solar during the day if you are living wiothout electricity.

-Christopher

-Christopher
Similar to this one thing I haven't seen much of on the forum (not that I have really looked for it tho...) is water jackets.. In the Wall tent hunting world I'd say 75% of the stoves the guys have will have a water jacket, the other 25% will have a big pot of wash water on the stove. Not sure that if that is the official name, or just another redneck'ism. But essentially they are kind of like a boiler. We use them for 2 basic reasons, to have hot water for washing and such, and the second is usually for a bit of added humidity depending on the RH.
But an added benefit of this is, depending on the size of your water jackets capacity and your creativity with plumbing you now have a heated liquid mass which will retain heat. Which will again depending on config will keep the firebox warm. here's a couple pics and a link to one from HD
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.c...B&gclsrc=aw.ds





Another option that I haven't seen mentioned thus far in the thread, is what we call burning a "green stick" whereby with a "hot box" (that's what she said....) of coals, you place a not fully seasoned softwood round log or two in atop the coal with one seasoned stick of hardwood this will burn incredibly slowly. Once you get the hang of it you can burn one 8" diameter 14-16" spruce round for as long or longer than the same size piece of birch. I would give it a test run during the day to assess, I also wouldn't be super keen to use this method in a stove pipe with more than 2 90's in it. plus this method increases your flexibility in fuel sourcing.
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