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Old 09-13-2019, 12:11 PM   #21
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I am no longer seeking a coach. I want all the comforts of a coach with the power and clearance of a 4x4 e.g. "Poshed" out conventional 90 passenger Thomas HDX 4x4 school bus. We want to drive down national forest and BLM dirt roads without the worry of damaging the undercarriage.

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Papa "Rollin" Bone

We're able to drive down most Forest Service roads and BLM areas with our conventional bus. We sometimes (but not always) scout with our towed vehicle ahead of time. One issue we encounter, as often as road conditions, is tight turns and low branches.....obstacle that can't really be overcome with 4x4 capabilities. Our bus is 36' long, which is comfortable living and pretty easy to maneuver on forest service roads. I think we've got 12" clearance between our luggage compartments and the ground. The only clearance issues we've had is with our automatic chains that dangle very close to the road and when I think I'm straddling a roadkill skunk just fine, the chains still manage to whack it and the ensuing stank lasts for hours.
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Old 09-13-2019, 12:38 PM   #22
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You are correct. The clearance issue is top and bottom. Thank you for your comment.
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Old 09-13-2019, 01:11 PM   #23
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Ignorance is bliss......

Nobody told me that I couldn't take my coach (Eagle 10) on Forest Service and logging roads. Lacking that information, I drove many miles over those roads.

I did get stuck once but that was on a gravel parking lot, at a golf course, in Texas.
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Old 09-13-2019, 02:43 PM   #24
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Dear PNW,

I am a newbie to this lifestyle. There are apparently two camps. I, as a naive newbie, can't imagine taking an unmodified Eagle 10 down a, let's say, a given national forest logging road. I'm sure it is possible-but is it advisable? I would love to boondock in the pic below in the fall.




http://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/...0_e01f494f.jpg
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Old 09-13-2019, 02:49 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by TheRollingBones View Post
Dear PNW,

I am a newbie to this lifestyle. There are apparently two camps. I, as a naive newbie, can't imagine taking an unmodified Eagle 10 down a, let's say, a given national forest logging road. I'm sure it is possible-but is it advisable? I would love to boondock in the pic below in the fall.




http://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/...0_e01f494f.jpg
When I first set out on the road, I would have taken that road without hesitation.

After I had been on the road for a couple of years I learned to scout questionable roads with my dingy first then take the bus.

Locations like you pictured are very reachable.
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Old 09-13-2019, 06:02 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRollingBones View Post
Dear PNW,

I am a newbie to this lifestyle. There are apparently two camps. I, as a naive newbie, can't imagine taking an unmodified Eagle 10 down a, let's say, a given national forest logging road. I'm sure it is possible-but is it advisable? I would love to boondock in the pic below in the fall.




http://s0.geograph.org.uk/geophotos/...0_e01f494f.jpg
Hunters have the saying that the Indian (Native American) is more important than the bow. Similarly, the Indian is also more important than the horse. You need to know what shots you can take and what paths you can ride.

There is not a winter going by where I pass with my rear wheel drive 3-series BMW several SUVs that are either hopelessly stuck in a ditch or even rolled over.

But, as posted above, I also had lapses of judgement and sunk a Unimog down to the frame. This is not the first time that the better capabilities of the vehicle increased the probability of me getting stuck. Several winters ago I buried my tricked out '84 Blazer in a 6 foot deep snow drift on BLM land. It sat there for over two weeks since no regular truck got close enough to pull me out. In any other vehicle I would also never have ventured there and saved myself a lot of shoveling.

Both roads you pictured can be driven with any bus on this forum including the coaches and transits. The winter road in the link could be dicey in areas where the snow melted in the sun an then froze over in subsequent shade. Most likely the driver of a more nimble and even 4x4 equipped van/bus would fall in this trap.
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Old 09-13-2019, 06:56 PM   #27
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In case anyone stumbles upon an oil well, here is a cool 'boondocking coach':
(starts at 6:30)

At 23:03 and 32:30 is an interesting detail that protects the living quarters from damage due to frame flex.
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Old 09-13-2019, 08:33 PM   #28
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I got to get me one!
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Old 09-13-2019, 08:41 PM   #29
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I got to get me one!


I hope you have truckloads of cash because that is what you will need.
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Old 09-15-2019, 09:55 AM   #30
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In case anyone stumbles upon an oil well, here is a cool 'boondocking coach':
(starts at 6:30)

At 23:03 and 32:30 is an interesting detail that protects the living quarters from damage due to frame flex.
Ran into one very similar to that camping in San Carlos, Son. It belonged to a Danish couple that had it shipped to Newfoundland and traveled across Canada, through the US and Mexico with their final destination was Panama.

One notable difference from the one pictured was the steel shutters with gun ports that you could close over the windows........... No kidding.
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Old 09-18-2019, 03:46 PM   #31
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Yep, a truck load of cash or someone else paying for it.
Iíve driven thousands of miles of forest service and blm roads. In my experience they block them off if they are not going to maintain them. Thereís a huge ditch dug by an excavator blocking the road. None Iíve seen are so bad a 4x4 is necessary. ďUser tracks and trailsĒ and primitive dispersed camping are another story. They are not official roads.
I would never want to take anything nice that Iíve paid for down rough tracks. Too many bad things happen. My Dad was a field geologist in East Africa From 1947 to 1969. He took Land Rovers and even a Unimog places I only dream about. He would only take our long suspension travel Peugeot on our family Safaris. Couldnít stand 4x4ís. He felt if a 4x4 is required your asking for trouble and headaches and a rough uncomfortable trip. And a 2x4 could go most of the places anyway. I do remember the tires spinning in the red surface mud as a huge bull elephant charged our Peugeot. We evaded it but it was close.
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Old 09-18-2019, 04:39 PM   #32
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I havenít looked at doing an AWD conversion on a pusher but any of the front engines buses are candidates. While not a Schoolie this is our latest rig designed for boon docking, full time living and making sure we can get that last 50 yards to that nice camp site.

IMG_7991.JPGIMG_7691.JPG
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:15 PM   #33
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there are 10 wheels on the typical american motor coach. Some tag axles only have two wheels. If all 6 or 10 wheels are powered-you would have a 10x10 0r a 6x6. If I am wrong, I apologize.

Respectfully
Papa "Rollin" Bone

When I was a kid 4x4 or 6x6 was common lingo. The first number was usually taken as the tire/wheel count and the second number was the transmission gear/speed count (although driven wheel count makes just as much sense) or vice versa?. Nothing makes any sense these days, people just use words any way they want or make words up as they go. In the age of digital communication, the art of communication just isn't what it used to be. I'm surprised that anybody understands anything today. Thanks for explaining your wording.
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:21 PM   #34
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When I was a kid 4x4 or 6x6 was common lingo. The first number was usually taken as the tire/wheel count and the second number was the transmission gear/speed count (although driven wheel count makes just as much sense) or vice versa?. Nothing makes any sense these days, people just use words any way they want or make words up as they go. In the age of digital communication, the art of communication just isn't what it used to be. I'm surprised that anybody understands anything today. Thanks for explaining your wording.
4 x 2 meant 4 wheels, 2 driven. 4 x 4 meant 4 wheels, 4 wheels driven. Never heard it any other way. 4 x 6 would be tandom axles driven, front wheels not driven. 6 x6 would be tandom axle all wheel drive. Never had referance to tranny or gears.
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:22 PM   #35
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Exactly right. You can then imagine the problem with a very uneven surface where the tag is solidly on the ground and the drive axle is not. Normal people do not take coaches into such conditions.

Normal people buy RVs.
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:28 PM   #36
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4x4 buses are out there. I've found one and will be doing a build soon for my retirement offroad travels. Mine is currently on 44 inch military tires.
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:38 PM   #37
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Would a "Glamoured up" 4x4 full length School Bus be an oxymoron?

Are there any structural or mechanical reasons why a 90 passenger Thomas Safe-t bus diesel pusher school bus interior could not look like this?

Secondly, what would keep someone (besides money) from lifting said bus and installing aggressive tires and a 4x4 drive-train plus full air ride suspension on said vehicle?

I look forward to your comments.

Grace and Peace.
Papa "Rollin" Bone

I don't know why you would want the inside to look like that. If you have that kind of money, just stay in hotels and hire a chopper for your daily adventures.


As far as the multi axle drive goes, - electric, hydraulic, or pneumatic driven wheels would be the easiest solution. Using off the shelf parts - hydraulic would probably be quicker/easier to design/build.
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:50 PM   #38
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4x4 buses are out there. I've found one and will be doing a build soon for my retirement offroad travels. Mine is currently on 44 inch military tires.



What is your departure angle?
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:54 PM   #39
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Quote:
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I don't know why you would want the inside to look like that. If you have that kind of money, just stay in hotels and hire a chopper for your daily adventures.


As far as the multi axle drive goes, - electric, hydraulic, or pneumatic driven wheels would be the easiest solution. Using off the shelf parts - hydraulic would probably be quicker/easier to design/build.
We are campers at heart. I have a big family. Hotels are sterile and boring for us. It's a "been there done that" kind of thing. I want to follow you on your build. What kind of bus is it? Where did you find the tires and 4wd kit?

Best Regards

Papa Rollin Bone PhD
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Old 09-18-2019, 08:55 PM   #40
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We are campers at heart. I have a big family. Hotels are sterile and boring for us. It's a "been there done that" kind of thing. I want to follow you on your build. What kind of bus is it? Where did you find the tires and 4wd kit?

Best Regards

Papa Rollin Bone
My wife is the glamper. The answer to the interior "getup" question is resale value and making my wife happy.
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