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Old 05-15-2019, 12:16 AM   #41
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I do like the emergency exit windows on your rig!


Should we decide on changing our windows to RV-style windows, I think we will try to find a few of them.
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Old 05-20-2019, 10:34 PM   #42
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I really like them too. I took all the latches and catches and cleaned the 20 plus years of crud from them and then lubed them good. Now they are work really well. We are opening and closing them all the time and it's easy.

I've been working several days at getting a pocket door installed right ahead of the pullman style bunks. The bus has so much room that I can afford to use residential style doors. So I went over to Lowes and got this two panel door and a universal kit. Even though it's universal, I've had to do a lot of tweaking, measuring, test fitting and more. But I've finally got the forward pocket door in and it's working really slick.
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Old 05-20-2019, 10:40 PM   #43
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I've been unsuccessful finding any E-windows remotely nearby. Would love to score at least a pair at some point.
Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodenYouKnowIt View Post
I really like them too. I took all the latches and catches and cleaned the 20 plus years of crud from them and then lubed them good. Now they are work really well. We are opening and closing them all the time and it's easy.

I've been working several days at getting a pocket door installed right ahead of the pullman style bunks. The bus has so much room that I can afford to use residential style doors. So I went over to Lowes and got this two panel door and a universal kit. Even though it's universal, I've had to do a lot of tweaking, measuring, test fitting and more. But I've finally got the forward pocket door in and it's working really slick.
Ah, semantics!
The concept of living in a bus is not part of most folx' Universe...
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Old 05-20-2019, 10:43 PM   #44
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So, I've hung the frame, cut the door down because it was way too long for the opening, mounted the rubber bumper that keeps it from sliding too far into the wall and then I had to figure out the proper bracing .... and on and on and on. But I've finally got it in. Then I took it out to paint it because if I don't paint it right now, it will never look quite right.

Here are a couple of views showing the door on each side of the "bunk" room.

The final shot shows the beige color I chose for paint.
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Old 05-20-2019, 10:46 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haz.matt.1960 View Post
The concept of living in a bus is not part of most folx' Universe...
Aint it the truth!! LOL
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Old 05-20-2019, 11:47 PM   #46
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Yup!
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Originally Posted by WoodenYouKnowIt View Post
Aint it the truth!! LOL
And you can put that in your pocket (door), and take it to the bank!
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Old 05-29-2019, 03:03 PM   #47
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I rant about my family, OSB and laminate flooring

I’ll start with OSB but first, a few thoughts about my family.

If you could round up ALL the native Tennesseans for some type of census, you would find that there are many thousands of TN folks that are highly intelligent, hard-working, warm, friendly and loving. They would give you the shirts off their backs and would never ask anything in return. A rather high percentage of the rest of the native TN folks are belligerent trailer-trash rednecks that don’t appear to have much and dang sure don’t want you to have anything either. These are the folks that give rise to jokes such as: “What is the definition of a Tennessee virgin?”
“A 13-year old that can outrun granddaddy.”
These people are idiots that laugh at you because they think you’re the idiot. And they are certain to tell you that you’re an idiot.

So, my family is mixed. I have lot of kinfolk that are of the first type described above and others who are the second type described previously. My finding and buying this Prevost has created one hell of a rift in the family. Many of my kin are very supportive and rooting for me. They’re even starting to drop by and help. But others are so jealous they have given rise to my signature line at the end of each of my posts that I’m sure you have noticed by now. One aunt asked my mother if she would actually live or travel in anything that I built? She was laughing as she asked but we knew there was one huge undertone to that joke. These people do not want to see me bring the bus to fruition and they will go to rather great lengths to throw a wrench into the works if they think they can do it in such a way as to be able to deny any wrongdoing if they get caught. No matter how workmanlike my project is and no matter how much of my carpentry skills can make this project look good, they will rip it apart verbally at every opportunity and they will have huge fun while they’re at it. Thus, I've made up my mind to do the very best work I've ever done and I will in that way enjoy my silent revenge with a smile.

Now I’ve been a professional carpenter for many years. I’ve built everything from cabinets to elegant staircases to exterior decks. I spent several years just doing trim carpentry and many more years installing, sanding and finishing hardwood floors. If this isn’t enough, I’ve built a number of mahogany boats and cedar canoes. My member name Wooden You Know It was the name I christened my 18 ft Mahogany Utility runabout when I built it back in the late 1990s. I sold that boat during the divorce and my ex-wife dumped my hard drive losing all my photos. Believe it or not, I do have one photo that shows a part of the forward deck and I'll post it.

Other people don’t understand me. When I do a project for myself, I know that all my kin are going to eventually see it, as they did with that boat I just mentioned. During the build, several said that I should be sure to put a very long CB antena on it. That way the boat could be found after it sank. So, I do the very best work I can do and I call it my: “Shut the hell up” work. You can only imagine then my reasons for NOT wanting to use OSB if I can help it. It really is ugly. So let’s talk a little about OSB.

If you’re not familiar with this stuff, OSB stands for Oriented Strand Board. It’s the big flaky stuff that is glued and pressed into sheets from the mill. It is sold as a cheaper alternative to plywood and used in many of the same applications. Also, it has excellent load bearing abilities and this is the reason it has become so popular in modern construction. I have a love/hate relationship with it. The love part is that it is very strong and fairly easy to work with. It is also way more inexpensive than the plywood I wish I had the money to use. I’m using a lot of OSB in my Prevost but I am going to have to figure how to hide it and make things look as good as I possibly can.

On the other hand, I have a hate/hate and hate it some more relationship with laminate flooring. It’s gnarly, nasty, piss poor crap. I bought a load of it at Habitat for Humanity and that was one of the biggest mistakes I’ve made on this bus project. To get it installed, I’ve struggled with getting it to fit. I finally had to resaw every piece and face nail it and even then, huge cracks were showing up in the floor. Plus, the boards don’t all lie the same. Once I got most of it in, I could see that the floor was very uneven. One board would be at one level and the next board would be up to an eighth of an inch lower or higher. Also, I then began to notice that some of it was delaminating right before my very eyes. A few days later, I was walking past a new store at the mall being built and they were installing brand new laminate flooring. I could immediately see that it was the same crap that I had and it looked terrible – at least to my eyes. I have given it a PG rating which stands for Pure Garbage.

To make matters worse, it completely ruined both my table saw blade and my miter saw blade. Knocked the sharp edges right off. Then as I was continuing to work on my bus, I noticed it getting very slippery with any sawdust, dirt or scrap paper on it making for some serious tripping and falling hazards. When my mom stepped on to the bus and immediately slipped and fell, I swore right then and there that this stuff is coming out. The photos that I have still show the laminate being in place. I will tear the stuff out tomorrow.

Sadly, the only photo I can find of my boat Wooden You Know It is the one below showing the fore deck. It doesn't do the boat justice.
I got the plans from Glen-L.com and the design is called the "Mist Miss."

That's Nickajack Lake BTW.
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Old 05-29-2019, 03:19 PM   #48
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《...overwhelmed...》
All I can say for right now is you have some relations, both the blood and legal (1st typed in, 'kind,' but reckoned they aren't, so) types, that seriously know how to put the FUN in
Dysfunctional family...
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Old 05-29-2019, 03:31 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by haz.matt.1960 View Post
...you have some relations... that seriously know how to put the FUN in
Dysfunctional family...
AINT THAT THE TRUTH!

My mom and I have had a terrible time trying to plan just how we want this project to go. So, we've actually found that if we focus on getting the vitals in place, we can then see where to go for the next miniproject.

Case in point: The pocket door has turned out really well. In front of the door will be the kitchen but we haven't known just how much space to allocate to it. We do know that we want as large a kitchen as we can get. But to figure the actually size, we decided to switch to the settee that will live just behind the driver. We have several criteria that we need to fill:
  • The settee needs to double as a bed.
  • We don't want the settee to be uncortable when relaxing. So we have given it a slight slant but not too much to be uncomfy for sleeping.
  • We need to hide the OSB with carpet.
  • The Prevost HVAC ductwork has a vent to expell the heated or air conditioned air. We need to figure that into the design of the settee.
  • All the cushions and padding need to be removable or adjustable to accomodate our ideas.

So, here's what we've come up with:

The first two photo show the original Prevost ductwork that we chose not to tear out. Other bus nuts actually will tear these out but we didn't figure that we could even dream of out engineering Prevost. We're keeping the original HVAC. You can see the largish vent down very close to the floor.

The second photo shows how we solved the problem of getting any sort of structure up against the original ductwork. We have figure the large vent into the facade.
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Old 05-29-2019, 03:34 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodenYouKnowIt View Post
Iíll start with OSB but first, a few thoughts about my family.

If you could round up ALL the native Tennesseans for some type of census, you would find that there are many thousands of TN folks that are highly intelligent, hard-working, warm, friendly and loving. They would give you the shirts off their backs and would never ask anything in return. A rather high percentage of the rest of the native TN folks are belligerent trailer-trash rednecks that donít appear to have much and dang sure donít want you to have anything either. These are the folks that give rise to jokes such as: ďWhat is the definition of a Tennessee virgin?Ē
ďA 13-year old that can outrun granddaddy.Ē
These people are idiots that laugh at you because they think youíre the idiot. And they are certain to tell you that youíre an idiot.

So, my family is mixed. I have lot of kinfolk that are of the first type described above and others who are the second type described previously. My finding and buying this Prevost has created one hell of a rift in the family. Many of my kin are very supportive and rooting for me. Theyíre even starting to drop by and help. But others are so jealous they have given rise to my signature line at the end of each of my posts that Iím sure you have noticed by now. One aunt asked my mother if she would actually live or travel in anything that I built? She was laughing as she asked but we knew there was one huge undertone to that joke. These people do not want to see me bring the bus to fruition and they will go to rather great lengths to throw a wrench into the works if they think they can do it in such a way as to be able to deny any wrongdoing if they get caught. No matter how workmanlike my project is and no matter how much of my carpentry skills can make this project look good, they will rip it apart verbally at every opportunity and they will have huge fun while theyíre at it. Thus, I've made up my mind to do the very best work I've ever done and I will in that way enjoy my silent revenge with a smile.

Now Iíve been a professional carpenter for many years. Iíve built everything from cabinets to elegant staircases to exterior decks. I spent several years just doing trim carpentry and many more years installing, sanding and finishing hardwood floors. If this isnít enough, Iíve built a number of mahogany boats and cedar canoes. My member name Wooden You Know It was the name I christened my 18 ft Mahogany Utility runabout when I built it back in the late 1990s. I sold that boat during the divorce and my ex-wife dumped my hard drive losing all my photos. Believe it or not, I do have one photo that shows a part of the forward deck and I'll post it.

Other people donít understand me. When I do a project for myself, I know that all my kin are going to eventually see it, as they did with that boat I just mentioned. During the build, several said that I should be sure to put a very long CB antena on it. That way the boat could be found after it sank. So, I do the very best work I can do and I call it my: ďShut the hell upĒ work. You can only imagine then my reasons for NOT wanting to use OSB if I can help it. It really is ugly. So letís talk a little about OSB.

If youíre not familiar with this stuff, OSB stands for Oriented Strand Board. Itís the big flaky stuff that is glued and pressed into sheets from the mill. It is sold as a cheaper alternative to plywood and used in many of the same applications. Also, it has excellent load bearing abilities and this is the reason it has become so popular in modern construction. I have a love/hate relationship with it. The love part is that it is very strong and fairly easy to work with. It is also way more inexpensive than the plywood I wish I had the money to use. Iím using a lot of OSB in my Prevost but I am going to have to figure how to hide it and make things look as good as I possibly can.

On the other hand, I have a hate/hate and hate it some more relationship with laminate flooring. Itís gnarly, nasty, piss poor crap. I bought a load of it at Habitat for Humanity and that was one of the biggest mistakes Iíve made on this bus project. To get it installed, Iíve struggled with getting it to fit. I finally had to resaw every piece and face nail it and even then, huge cracks were showing up in the floor. Plus, the boards donít all lie the same. Once I got most of it in, I could see that the floor was very uneven. One board would be at one level and the next board would be up to an eighth of an inch lower or higher. Also, I then began to notice that some of it was delaminating right before my very eyes. A few days later, I was walking past a new store at the mall being built and they were installing brand new laminate flooring. I could immediately see that it was the same crap that I had and it looked terrible Ė at least to my eyes. I have given it a PG rating which stands for Pure Garbage.

To make matters worse, it completely ruined both my table saw blade and my miter saw blade. Knocked the sharp edges right off. Then as I was continuing to work on my bus, I noticed it getting very slippery with any sawdust, dirt or scrap paper on it making for some serious tripping and falling hazards. When my mom stepped on to the bus and immediately slipped and fell, I swore right then and there that this stuff is coming out. The photos that I have still show the laminate being in place. I will tear the stuff out tomorrow.

Sadly, the only photo I can find of my boat Wooden You Know It is the one below showing the fore deck. It doesn't do the boat justice.
I got the plans from Glen-L.com and the design is called the "Mist Miss."

That's Nickajack Lake BTW.

I completely agree with you about the OSB and the laminate flooring - my areas of expertise are limited to painting and drywall filling, and for some of the other things I'm an adequate handy man - my goal on something like a bus is that it's warm enough to be comfortable in fairly extreme winter weather, everything is straight and square, the holes are filled, that it looks unique, it's practical, and does the job I want it to do - an old time racer once told me when I was being somewhat intimidated by some of the fancy rigs that had arrived with their teams in tow, ( some had to be worth over $100,000 40 years ago ) that 'we aren't here to race trucks, we're here to race dogs', and, 'beware of the guy driving a rusty old pickup, because he spent all his money buying good dogs' - lol - to each his own - that said, you are doing a beautiful job on your Motorhome
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Old 05-29-2019, 03:40 PM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleddgracer View Post
I completely agree with you about the OSB and the laminate flooring - my areas of expertise are limited to painting and drywall filling, and for some of the other things I'm an adequate handy man - my goal on something like a bus is that it's warm enough to be comfortable in fairly extreme winter weather, everything is straight and square, the holes are filled, that it looks unique, it's practical, and does the job I want it to do - an old time racer once told me when I was being somewhat intimidated by some of the fancy rigs that had arrived with their teams in tow, ( some had to be worth over $100,000 40 years ago ) that 'we aren't here to race trucks, we're here to race dogs', and, 'beware of the guy driving a rusty old pickup, because he spent all his money buying good dogs' - lol - to each his own - that said, you are doing a beautiful job on your Motorhome
That counsel about the guy with the rusty truck is very sage advice. And thank you very much for the kind words. That is very encouraging.

There is no way that my Prevost will look like one of the multi million dollar coaches such as the Liberties or Marathons. But honestly, I don't even WANT my coach to look like them. They are way too vulgar with their opulence. Also, I have to say that I've seen some of those coaches up close and they are a rip-off. They are made of formica over particle board. ARE YOU KIDDING?

Also, we don't need floors with glitter in them and we don't need marble countertops.
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Old 05-29-2019, 03:53 PM   #52
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Yesterday, Mom and I started mocking up the settee. (...and just so folks will know, Mom is 87 and I'm 62. She has had several heart attacks, a stroke and can only walk short distances without help. She fatigues very easily but she is a trooper because she wants this bus as bad as anything ever in her life. I am her sole caregiver. We entered this project together and we intend to use it to get off the hamster wheel. I can't believe how single minded we've become and how very well we are working together.)

Mom found this memory foam mattress in the attic or someplace and she is cutting it to fit the settee. It's a twin mattress but it just sticks out into the aisle if we didn't cut it down.

In the second photo, we've got it mocked up. The three cushions on top are from an old couch. Mom says she can make new covers for both the cushions and the memory foam mattress.

In the fourth and fifth photos, I'm mocking up the structure that will be under the mattress.
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Old 05-29-2019, 04:01 PM   #53
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We've figure out how to build the frame - all of it from OSB. (what else?) We have used a piece of OSB for the bottom and I cut a couple of more pieces for the back supports. Again, we're not fastening all of it down because it needs to be removable.

After we got all of these cut in the way we wanted, we started covering them with carpet. This will hide the OSB and at least make for a cleaner installation. (I think)

We are certainly not professional upholsterers and would probably get fired if we were - too many wrinkles. But this is going to serve our purpose well.

That's my twin brother (fraternal, not identical) sitting on the settee. He has been coming over to help a lot and he's been GREAT!
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Old 05-29-2019, 05:02 PM   #54
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Nice progress. You are going to like those windows. Dory has them in a similar style. Love them... panorama view, tinted so you are not exposed and they vent really well.
How much did you drive it around to be sure that all stuff is working.


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Old 05-29-2019, 06:42 PM   #55
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Quote:
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How much did you drive it around to be sure that all stuff is working.
I didn’t get to drive it a whole lot before I went ahead and handed over the lettuce. But I felt that it was worth the gamble given that the seller was only asking $6000 for it. For that price, I figured that I could find any problem and learn to fix it if I had to and it would be worth it.

Post #16 on this thread shows the flat tire we had. That meant that I had to nurse it home and it felt like I was driving on a tripod. But I’ve driven school buses enough to know how buses are supposed to ride and I could tell that the weird feeling was definitely due to the flat tire.

When I drove the bus, I could tell that the engine was in great shape. It had been sitting for months but it fired right up, ran very quietly, had no overheating, blew zero smoke and pulled hard. I also got to test the features. Allison trans shifted great – it’s a six-speed. Cruise control worked perfectly. One of the power mirrors doesn’t work but the other does. It was raining really hard the day I drove it home. Wipers all worked well. All lights worked, both low and high buoy and the kneeling feature all worked well. Also, the switch to raise and lower the tag axle worked very well. It sounds a little chime to remind me that the tag is up and I need to lower it before I take off down the road.

The wheels are all Alcoa aluminum. I learned all about how to polish aluminum to sparkle like chrome when I had my Harley. I will have these wheels looking like new money. The center caps are all missing but I found really nice ones for not much money on Amazon.

When I parked the coach and shut down the engine, I heard a huge air leak and I thought, “Oh GREAT! I have no clue how I’m going to track that down.” But it turned out that this bus, like all Prevosts, levels itself by bleeding off air until the coach is perfectly level. I don’t know how they do that. As soon as the bus was level, my “air leak” stopped. This level feature can only take me so far. The driveway to my house has a considerable elevation change. When I parked the Prevost where we could work on it, it went to the limit trying to level itself and it’s not perfect, but it’s darn near close and we’ve been able to do well with it. The guys at the Prevost dealer in Goodlettsville told me that when I get all the air bags replaced and any and all leaks tracked down and fixed, this leveling feature will do amazing things for the coach's ability to resist heavy cross winds when running down the interstate. It will also work wonders for dealing with cloverleafs and sudden panic turns. ...not that anyone would want to take that for granted.

I love the air brakes. Also, this bus has a Jake brake with three positions. Off, light Jake and really strong Jake. The route home took me down some of the steepest hills in Clarksville and the really strong Jake almost threw me into the windshield.

There is a CB antenna that was installed from the factory. It is such a well-done job that you almost can’t even see where the coax goes into the bus. And of course, it comes out in the driver’s position down low between the driver and the coin window. There is a mount made for a Cobra CB. The seller told me that a Cobra originally came with the bus but someone broke in and stole it here in Clarksville. I wondered why. Do you know how not expensive Cobras are these days? They’re selling for the same prices that they sold for in 1979 and I know from experience that they are really fine radios. So, I’ll just get another Cobra and be king of the road. LOL

The air suspension seat is worthless. I don’t like it. But then, I’m morbidly obese and I weigh well over the 250lbs that the seat is rated for. So, I can’t necessarily blame the seat. I will figure something out. (…like maybe a darned diet)

Of course, the bus has some problems. I don’t know how to get the Webasto to work. The controls don’t do anything. The electrical plug on the engine cover has been hit and has caved in. But I can replace that and I figure I have until winter to sort out the Webasto.

The passenger’s side window shade works very well but the driver’s side does not. Neither does the coin window. The air control for the door is wonky and the only way I can get it to shut is to hold the close button on the dash. As soon as I take my thumb off of it, the door flies open including when I’m driving down the road

The coach does not require an ignition key. But the bays and door do. They all use the same key. The seller had no keys for it. I called Prevost to see if I could get a new key. The parts guy asked for my VIN and when I gave it to him, he read me back a number, started an account for me and told me to always keep that number close by. This was because I could go to any Prevost dealer in the world and many repair places and with that number, they all could know exactly which coach I have. They would not just know what series my coach is but they would know THE EXACT BUS! He said he didn’t have any keys but he could have some other dealer mail me some. I gave him my VISA number and the keys showed up in my mail two days later from the Prevost dealer in Boston. They sent me three of them and it cost me around $7. All three keys are the same and they open every bay, every door and all the access panels. AMAZING.

I found a guy that offers a mobile tire service for OTR truckers. He found a good used tire for the flat on the tag axle. When he jacked up the coach and removed the wheel, I got my first really good look under the bus. The original owner was in northern Ohio. They drove tours back and forth from Cleveland to some casino somewhere. Eventually they went bankrupt and the bus switched hands. The new company was only a few miles away and also made casino runs. When they went under, the bus sat for a number of years on a back lot in western PA until someone bought it and donated it to the Safe Harbor Ministries here in TN. These were the people that sold it to me. Anyway, this bus had spent enough time up there in the salt belt that it had some cancer on the main frame rails. I got to digging around on it with my pocket knife and it is not bad at all. Most of a Prevost chassis is made from stainless steel and only a few places are standard cold steel. I have a MIG welder and cutting tools in the garage and so, I shouldn’t have any problems getting the chassis back to like new condition. Then I will paint the dickens out of it with POR15. That will be the end of that.

Plans for the near future include replacing all the air bags simply because I do not know how many miles are on these. The odometer shows 164,000 on it but I don’t know if I can trust it. The other odometer that lives on the passenger’s side driving wheels is gone. Prevost puts one of those on EVERY bus. So I don’t know…

Also, I don’t know how long these tires are going to last. They’re not showing any cracks or dry rot but they are all different brands. That has always scared me when I bought a used car or something. So,I would rather just get brand new ones and be done with that. Mom and I plan to take a series of very short trips to build confidence in the bus’s reliability. At first, we’ll stick to the back roads with a friend driving along behind to help us get help if needed. I don’t know what else to do so, we’ll just play it by ear one trip at a time until the trips can get really long.

Anyhow, that’s the story and now you know how we came to own this machine.
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Old 05-29-2019, 07:44 PM   #56
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Greenwood, Indiana
Posts: 669
Year: 1999
Coachwork: New Flyer
Chassis: D45HF "Viking"
Engine: 11.1L Detroit Diesel S60
Rated Cap: 51,600


Now I almost wish I had bought a Prevost....
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Old 05-29-2019, 07:51 PM   #57
Skoolie
 
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Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Lake Barkley
Posts: 127
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Prevost
Chassis: H3-45
Engine: Detroit DDEC III
Rated Cap: A LOT
You know?...

It's interesting. I had heard of Prevost before. Being from Nashville, I always saw the entertainer coaches floating through town and they were always either Prevosts or Eagles. Once the Eagles were no longer manufactured, Prevost just seemed to take over the entertainment business. But that's all that I knew about them.

So, when I came upon this bus, I knew I was getting a good one but I just didn't know HOW good.
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Old 05-29-2019, 08:07 PM   #58
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Greenwood, Indiana
Posts: 669
Year: 1999
Coachwork: New Flyer
Chassis: D45HF "Viking"
Engine: 11.1L Detroit Diesel S60
Rated Cap: 51,600
OHhh, its good alright.


My New Flyer was a city bus - no automatic levelers like that. The rubes don't need 'em....


However, I will say the New Flyer build is pretty clean. There are a few things I have a love/hate relationship with though - namely the side (wheelchair) door and the roof-mounted HVAC.


The side door takes up aLOT of wallspace (almost 5'!). We want to keep it (pull-out porch in the bay underneath) for a 3-season door, and have the entrance in the front be for the "mud room" during the winter.


The rooftop HVAC takes up about 3/5ths of the roof, so my rooftop accessories will be limited (mainly solar), but, wow, its a ten (10) ton unit! Most houses have between 1.5 and 3 tons of cooling!


One other "weird" detail - I don't have a fuel gauge.... It was a city bus, so they made sure it carried enough for a full-day run. Back at the barn they'd just fill 'er back up.... If someone could stand to burn through 160 gallons of diesel, they'd have driven over 600 miles.
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Old 05-30-2019, 08:13 PM   #59
Skoolie
 
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Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Lake Barkley
Posts: 127
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Prevost
Chassis: H3-45
Engine: Detroit DDEC III
Rated Cap: A LOT
So does the fuel tank have a 160 gallon capacity?

If so, 600 miles is good range but you're right. You'd have to fill up every day if you wanting to make some time on a trip. But that's only 3.75 miles to the gallon. Surely the bus will get better than that, right?
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Old 05-30-2019, 08:30 PM   #60
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Greenwood, Indiana
Posts: 669
Year: 1999
Coachwork: New Flyer
Chassis: D45HF "Viking"
Engine: 11.1L Detroit Diesel S60
Rated Cap: 51,600
Quote:
Originally Posted by WoodenYouKnowIt View Post
So does the fuel tank have a 160 gallon capacity?

If so, 600 miles is good range but you're right. You'd have to fill up every day if you wanting to make some time on a trip. But that's only 3.75 miles to the gallon. Surely the bus will get better than that, right?

My tank is 160 gallons. The ECU states that the bus has a lifetime MPG of 4, but that was with a lot of stop-n-go, idling, and HVAC. The engineering data on the prototype for this model of bus states an average MPG of 6.7. I hope to get 8 on the open road, but I kinda doubt it....
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