Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-10-2021, 02:41 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: New York
Posts: 54
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Me
Engine: Series 60
How to change school bus tire with no air compressor nearby.

Hello,

So the one thing I don't have is a suitable air compressor to run a impact drill to take off a bus tire. Any recommended anything electric or something similar I can use to remove lug nuts safely so I can change out a tire? Thanks

the7exp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2021, 03:46 PM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 1,167
Year: 1990
Coachwork: Thomas 4 window w/lift
Chassis: G30~Chevy cutaway
Engine: 5.7/350 Chevy Vortec
Rated Cap: Just me and my "stuff"?
A torque multiplier will most likely help you...
https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...2635_200732635
peteg59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2021, 05:14 PM   #3
Bus Nut
 
s2mikon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: NM USA KD6WJG
Posts: 783
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE 40 FEET
Engine: Cummins 8.3
What peteg59 just said. I have the same one. It works.
__________________
“Have you ever noticed that anybody driving slower than you is an idiot, and anyone going faster than you is a maniac?
” George Carlin
s2mikon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2021, 05:37 PM   #4
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: New York
Posts: 54
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Me
Engine: Series 60
Thanks all. What about buying a air compressor and impact tool? What should I buy?
the7exp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2021, 05:45 PM   #5
Bus Nut
 
s2mikon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: NM USA KD6WJG
Posts: 783
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE 40 FEET
Engine: Cummins 8.3
You will need a 1" impact gun and a 50 cfm compressor. If you buy a smaller compressor it will take a lot longer to get the job done. And you may still need the above mentioned torque multiplier.
__________________
“Have you ever noticed that anybody driving slower than you is an idiot, and anyone going faster than you is a maniac?
” George Carlin
s2mikon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2021, 05:48 PM   #6
Bus Nut
 
s2mikon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: NM USA KD6WJG
Posts: 783
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE 40 FEET
Engine: Cummins 8.3
I use the torque multiplier to loosen all 10 nuts and then use an electric impact to spin them off. Just the reverse to mount them.
__________________
“Have you ever noticed that anybody driving slower than you is an idiot, and anyone going faster than you is a maniac?
” George Carlin
s2mikon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2021, 09:17 PM   #7
Bus Crazy
 
roach711's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Farmington Hills, Mi (Detroit area)
Posts: 1,964
Year: 2000
Coachwork: Eldorado Aerotech 24'
Chassis: Ford E-450 Cutaway Bus
Engine: 7.3L Powerstroke
Rated Cap: 19
I carry a 3/4" drive breaker bar and a 3' length of square tubing as a low buck "torque multiplier."
__________________
The Roach Motel
roach711 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2021, 10:46 PM   #8
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Near Flagstaff AZ
Posts: 892
Quote:
Originally Posted by the7exp View Post
Thanks all. What about buying a air compressor and impact tool? What should I buy?
I wouldn't even consider trying to buy a compressor and impact gun for changing tires on the road. I also don't rely on a socket and breaker bar, even with a long pipe cheater bar. I've had lug nuts which were so tight I couldn't budge them with a 5-foot pipe...but was able to spin them off with one arm, using this:

Screen Shot 2021-06-06 at 6.18.03 AM.jpg

I think every bus owner should have one of these, a jack, some blocks, and a short shovel (which works well as a prying tool for lifting the tire off and on the hub).
rossvtaylor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2021, 06:19 AM   #9
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: iowa
Posts: 574
Year: 1998
Coachwork: bluebird
Chassis: chevy
Engine: 3116 catapillar
Rated Cap: formerly 71 now 2 or 4
the most important thing with lug nuts is use neversieze on them. take it apart at home and every time you have the wheels off use it. now this is where those chrome lug nut covers really shine as they keep the neversieze from getting washed off. also if you have pilot mount wheels (1 lug nut for both wheels instead of budd nuts which have nut for the outside then a inner nut with a square drive for the inside wheel) the pilot mount is the large hole and fits tight on the ring of the hub. clean the rust off it and neversize it also. this will save you when the emergency tire repair on the road runs into extra pay as he has to pound your wheel off with a slege hammer
mmoore6856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2021, 06:49 AM   #10
Skoolie
 
Tejon7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2020
Location: Missoula, MT
Posts: 155
Year: 1990
Coachwork: Crown
Chassis: Supercoach
Engine: Detroit 6-71TA, Roadranger 10 sp.
Rated Cap: 90 gum-chewing demons
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmoore6856 View Post
the most important thing with lug nuts is use neversieze on them.
I don't know enough to have a personal opinion here, but other new bus owners reading this should be aware that using anti-seize compounds on lug nuts is not a universally accepted practice. In fact, it's quite controversial. A quick Google search found the following link with a discussion about this topic:

https://www.busconversionmagazine.co...p?topic=3536.0
Tejon7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2021, 07:39 AM   #11
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Near Flagstaff AZ
Posts: 892
I can't speak to the issue of using or not using anti-seize compound on wheel studs and nuts, but I would point out that IF you use it it should only be applied to the threads and care must be taken to not get any between the nut and the wheel. Gillig, for example, has this warning in their service manual:

Screen Shot 2021-06-11 at 5.20.04 AM.png

They have the best skull and crossbones drawings, by the way...

Now, in my prior career in the wind turbine industry, I became aware that fasteners had different torque specs dry and wet. The change in coefficient of friction in wet and dry conditions would change the amount of stretch applied to the fastener. In other words, a bolt torqued to 500 foot pounds dry would stretch less than a bolt torqued to 500 foot pounds wet...simply because the reduced stickocity (a word I just made up) of the wet/lubricated nut would allow it to rotate further before the torque wrench yells, "stop" and as a result the bolt was under more tension than a dry fastener. Manufacturers considered "wet" to include oil, grease, anti-seize or even thread locking compounds.

From the Gillig warning, it seems that they aren't concerned about wet threads...maybe the threads being wet doesn't make enough of a difference? But they seem quite concerned about lubricating the facing/mating surfaces between the nut and the wheel.

Of more practical note for those changing their own tires, please remember that some buses have left-hand (LH) threads on the studs on the left side of the bus. On those studs, usually marked with a L or LH stamp on the end of the stud, righty tighty/lefty loosey won't work. Even though I know this, I've (more than once) caught myself turning them the wrong way out of habit...

Screen Shot 2021-06-11 at 5.19.39 AM.png
rossvtaylor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2021, 07:56 AM   #12
Bus Geek
 
musigenesis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 5,701
Year: 2003
Coachwork: International
Chassis: CE 300
Engine: DT466e
Rated Cap: 65C-43A
Quote:
Originally Posted by rossvtaylor View Post
They have the best skull and crossbones drawings, by the way...
I've never seen one where the bone appeared to be going into the skull like that. It's a pretty stark warning when somebody rips off your leg and bashes you in the head with it. It was probably the dude's dentist: "I told you to floss!"
__________________
Rusty 87 build thread
musigenesis is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2021, 08:07 AM   #13
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Near Flagstaff AZ
Posts: 892
Quote:
Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
I've never seen one where the bone appeared to be going into the skull like that. It's a pretty stark warning when somebody rips off your leg and bashes you in the head with it. It was probably the dude's dentist: "I told you to floss!"
Haha! Thanks, MG...I just spit morning coffee through my nose...
rossvtaylor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2021, 08:14 AM   #14
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: iowa
Posts: 574
Year: 1998
Coachwork: bluebird
Chassis: chevy
Engine: 3116 catapillar
Rated Cap: formerly 71 now 2 or 4
Read and understand what that warning is telling you.
Lubricant is oil antisieze is not a lubricant once again google is full of morons. Ask any tire guy that works on them not google. Been there for 20 years doing that with antisieze and never lost a wheel
mmoore6856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2021, 08:16 AM   #15
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: iowa
Posts: 574
Year: 1998
Coachwork: bluebird
Chassis: chevy
Engine: 3116 catapillar
Rated Cap: formerly 71 now 2 or 4
I read it on the internet so it must be true is the wrong way to find answers. Ask a person that actually does it
mmoore6856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2021, 08:33 AM   #16
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Near Flagstaff AZ
Posts: 892
It was not my intent to make anyone think I was arguing against using anti-seize...and I did read and understand what the warning told me. Oil is, indeed, a lubricant. But so is anti-seize. In fact, Permatex and other manufacturers of anti-seize call them Anti-Seize Lubricant.

Screen Shot 2021-06-11 at 6.23.28 AM.png

So, since the manufacturer of the anti-seize calls it a lubricant...and the manufacturer of 3 of our buses warns me not to allow a lubricant to get between the mating faces of the nut and wheel...I will follow that caution and thought it prudent to share it with others.

Hopefully I have soothed any undue morning testiness.
rossvtaylor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2021, 09:15 AM   #17
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: West Ohio
Posts: 2,403
Year: 1984
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International 1753
Engine: 6.9 International
Rated Cap: 65
Don't buy an air compressor and 1 inch gun to remove your wheels on the off-chance that you have to. You'll be $1000+ in tools and it's not necessary. Like others have said, a 1" breaker bar and a thick cheater pipe is way cheaper. If you want, buy a cheap torque multiplier if you really insist on spending money.

If you do buy the compressor and gun, you'll need to buy 1/2" air lines and quick connects as well. Your standard compressor hoses are 1/4" or 3/8" and won't flow enough to supply the 1 inch gun.

Use neverseize on hub pilot and stud pilot rims only. They have enough torque on the nut to not be affected by the lubricant causing the nut to spin back off. We actually use white lithium grease in an aerosol can in the shop. It's quicker/easier/cleaner to apply then neverseize.

Never oil/grease threads on a passneger car/light truck or on dayton rims. The torque isn't high enough to prevent back off from the slickness of the grease. If the nut won't spin on easily, clean up the threads on the nut and stud with a thread chaser.

If you're nuts have an integral washer. a drop of oil between the washer and nut will keep you from trashing rims from the washer spinning with the nut. Neverseize and grease doesn't work as well on that because you can't easily apply it where it needs to be.
__________________
My build: The Silver Bullet https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/p...llet-9266.html
Booyah45828 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2021, 09:20 AM   #18
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 2,211
Year: 2007
Coachwork: Thomas Built
Chassis: Minotour
Engine: Chevy Express 3500 6.6l
I thought this thread was going to be about flicking matches at a tire full of starting fluid
Danjo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2021, 10:43 AM   #19
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 15,214
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DTA360 / MT643
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
if using a torque multiplier how do you torque the bolts back down.. do you use the quoted gear ratio as a torque ratio? ie if the gear ratio is 1.5:1 in the torque multiplier and you want 450 ft lbs on the nut do you set your torque wrench at 300?


or do you still have to have a long pipe and bounce like crazy on the torque wrench without the multiplier to put them on?
cadillackid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2021, 11:14 AM   #20
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Near Flagstaff AZ
Posts: 892
Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
if using a torque multiplier how do you torque the bolts back down.. do you use the quoted gear ratio as a torque ratio? ie if the gear ratio is 1.5:1 in the torque multiplier and you want 450 ft lbs on the nut do you set your torque wrench at 300?


or do you still have to have a long pipe and bounce like crazy on the torque wrench without the multiplier to put them on?
Good question...and I'll be frank, that when I change a tire on the roadside I torque them tight by feel with the torque multiplier. This is not ideal and not a recommendation to others. The torque multiplier I posted above is too sloppy and imprecise for me to count on it being accurate. But it's super powerful.

Now, at home with our shop that's different. I have and use a different torque multiplier and a torque wrench to tighten the lug nuts. This one is a pretty precise tool with a 3X multiple. And yes, for this, I do exactly what you describe...math! I had one of these from my wind turbine days where we had to tighten alternator bolts to 700 ft pounds in a pretty small space. I could do that with a standard 1/2-inch torque wrench and this multiplier. Our mechanical engineers actually specified this particular Neiko tool, after they tested it and found it to be accurate.

Screen Shot 2021-06-11 at 9.08.02 AM.jpg

I've had one of these for about 10 years now and it's a great tool. The "last purchased" date shown from last year was when I bought one as a gift for a vintage diesel mechanic.
rossvtaylor is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:50 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.