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Old 12-15-2022, 05:02 PM   #41
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One more thing, thoroughly inspect the gasket surfaces, if you can't see it, run your finger along the surface of the engine where the pump attaches. Make sure that the old gasket is completely cleaned off. Just a small imperfection and you could break one of the ears off the new pump when you tighten it down.
You probably already knew this, but I don't like to assume anything.

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Old 12-16-2022, 06:52 PM   #42
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thanks, that is tomorrows plans. The pump should be here by then. I've also heard that I need to rotate the cam to its lowest or highest point depending your point of view. Not sure how to do that. If I just bump the starter do I risk starting, for a short time, using the fuel in the IP.
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Old 12-16-2022, 07:41 PM   #43
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I wouldn't be too concerned about bumping the engine over. It shouldn't take too much effort to compress the spring in the pump arm when you install it.
(I've been wrong before though}
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Old 12-17-2022, 06:29 AM   #44
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I;ll let you know, the distributor called and my fuel pump is in. I'll pick it up today.
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Old 12-17-2022, 09:41 AM   #45
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I wouldn't worry about positioning the cam lobe or anything. So long as you insert the arm of the pump at a downward angle when it's going into the block, it should correctly orient itself below the lobe.

The only time people have issues with this is if they insert the arm into the engine at an upward angle, and manage to get the arm above the lobe instead of below. Original pumps were actually better at installing then new pumps, because the arm was bent in a way that made it almost impossible to install the arm above the lobe. New pumps have a straight arm, which can allow you to install the pump incorrectly if you insert it at an upward angle. Insert it at a downward angle and all should be well.

Since a picture is worth a 1000 words, here is the differences between new and old that I mentioned.

Spring type lockwashers have actually been shown to increase the chances of fasteners loosening over no washer at all. Serrated fasteners or washers are what you want, but those only work if the material the serration is contacting is soft. A threadlocker of some sort is proven to work the best, unless of course you're using a mechanical locker like a cotter key/castle nut or some other similar method. We use permatex brand, because it's more commonly available for me then Locktite. Use the blue color and you very likely will have no issue with loosening or removal when you want to.
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Old 12-19-2022, 01:48 PM   #46
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new fuel pump

I picked up the new fuel pump. The arm is a lot different than the old one but I guess that does not make a difference.
I did notice that I got 2 identical gaskets. It is unlike the Chinese to include extra parts. Is there a spacing thing I need to check?
or is there a technique l dont know about like gluing one to each surface but no glue in between to make it easier to slide and align things; I'm just guessing

I do notice that the lever on the old pump is real easy to press, I just hold the pump in my hands and work the lever.
The new pump arm does not move even when I hold it against the bench. I have not tried putting it in a vice yet.
I'm hoping this is a good thing; the old pump is worn out, the diaphragm is no good and thus no resistance.

I'm worried that will I be able to press it into place.
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Old 12-19-2022, 02:07 PM   #47
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I've never seen an application that called for double gaskets, that's usually a recipe for leaks.
You should be able to manipulate the pump by hand...removing the dust caps may help.
Hoping someone with more knowledge will join this discussion....hello???
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Old 12-19-2022, 02:52 PM   #48
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One gasket. No clue why they included 2. Might be in case you lose or ruin one with the install. I occasionally find extra pieces with auto parts, I assume it's because certain scenarios require it and it's easier to always include them instead of creating multiple part numbers.

The fact that you can move the old one is an indication that it failed. You shouldn't be able to easily move it, as it should be acting against the spring in the pump. Diaphragm pumps actually use the spring inside to pump/compress fuel. The arm only serves to recompress the spring at the top/beginning of the stroke. Diaphragm pumps using the spring to do the pumping is how they regulate fuel flow/pressure.
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Old 12-21-2022, 04:46 PM   #49
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Yep, thread locker.

Several companies make versions of it. I stick with LOCTITE or PERMATEX.
In Permatex, the RED requires special tools and/or heat (it's meant for things that you aren't going back into. BLUE is for normal fastner retention but where you might need to go back in.


That's not saying you HAVE to have a torch to get the red to let go but it will take some serious torque and a few raps with a heavy hammer on the head.
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