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Old 06-30-2022, 06:38 AM   #1
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Dual wheel inboard heat

2006 International ce 300 school bus Hi folks, I've got an inboard dual wheel that according to my tire minder is overheating to 167f wondering if there are any known causes for this. Is this temp way to high my other wheels are all cooler so i suspect a problem with either the wheel or the sensor the sensor is easy enough to check when i leave my current location I'll move the sensor to a different wheel. Please help with any suggestions thanks

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Old 06-30-2022, 07:09 AM   #2
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Brake drag
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Old 06-30-2022, 07:24 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
Brake drag

THIS!


if you have an infrared thermometer.. when you drive and notice the temp going up, stop and point the thermometer at the disc or drum (whichever you have) from that wheel and the other rear... if there is a big difference, look to the brakes..
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Old 06-30-2022, 07:43 AM   #4
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Bad bearings can create wheel heat too. But in my experience, it's balanced between the wheels. Anytime I see an inboard wheel hotter then the outboard, it's likely brake drag, especially if the heat is biased left to right. If both inboards are warm, then you might be just using the brakes that hard.
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Old 06-30-2022, 09:02 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
Bad bearings can create wheel heat too. But in my experience, it's balanced between the wheels. Anytime I see an inboard wheel hotter then the outboard, it's likely brake drag, especially if the heat is biased left to right. If both inboards are warm, then you might be just using the brakes that hard.

or the tires are mismatched.. same size but different tread pattern or different amount of wear can make a tire run warm.. it would show up in a TPMS but the hub or lug nuts wouldnt be hotter there...
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Old 06-30-2022, 09:21 AM   #6
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Yeah, never considered that. Some people would do that, but if the duals don't match, I won't put them on.
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Old 06-30-2022, 09:35 AM   #7
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Yeah, never considered that. Some people would do that, but if the duals don't match, I won't put them on.

I wont either but sometimes when schools sell busses they put the crappiest tires from other busses on the sale units if the sale unit has good tires..
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Old 06-30-2022, 02:59 PM   #8
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when matching tires use a flexible tape and measure the circumference not the diameter. if you bolt a smaller tire to a larger one every time the big tire makes one revolution and is lets say 100 inches in circumference your other tire must travel 100 inches also but if it is only 97 inches in circumference it has to slip (skid) on the pavement 3 inches to keep up every revolution. average truck tire is about 100 inches so it will make about 625 revolutions per mile. that would be skidding that tire around 1800 inches every mile.even with only a half of a inch difference it still would be a bit over 300 inches per mile. that is a cause of blowouts along with mismatched tire preasure
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Old 07-03-2022, 02:51 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
THIS!


if you have an infrared thermometer.. when you drive and notice the temp going up, stop and point the thermometer at the disc or drum (whichever you have) from that wheel and the other rear... if there is a big difference, look to the brakes..
Temp gun I have good idea too verify the tpms I have thanks for the advice
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Old 07-03-2022, 02:52 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by mmoore6856 View Post
when matching tires use a flexible tape and measure the circumference not the diameter. if you bolt a smaller tire to a larger one every time the big tire makes one revolution and is lets say 100 inches in circumference your other tire must travel 100 inches also but if it is only 97 inches in circumference it has to slip (skid) on the pavement 3 inches to keep up every revolution. average truck tire is about 100 inches so it will make about 625 revolutions per mile. that would be skidding that tire around 1800 inches every mile.even with only a half of a inch difference it still would be a bit over 300 inches per mile. that is a cause of blowouts along with mismatched tire preasure
I'll check this once I get a flexible tape measure... good idea thank you
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Old 07-03-2022, 02:55 PM   #11
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Bad bearings can create wheel heat too. But in my experience, it's balanced between the wheels. Anytime I see an inboard wheel hotter then the outboard, it's likely brake drag, especially if the heat is biased left to right. If both inboards are warm, then you might be just using the brakes that hard.
Any quick method you know to verify bad bearing. I was wondering about this started thinking seal and bearing just do them and get it over with...
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Old 07-03-2022, 02:56 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
Bad bearings can create wheel heat too. But in my experience, it's balanced between the wheels. Anytime I see an inboard wheel hotter then the outboard, it's likely brake drag, especially if the heat is biased left to right. If both inboards are warm, then you might be just using the brakes that hard.
What about a bad brake can leaking from the spring e brake side and slightly activating the foot brake. Is this possible
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Old 07-04-2022, 09:09 AM   #13
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What about a bad brake can leaking from the spring e brake side and slightly activating the foot brake. Is this possible

if the can is bad you'll see your pressure dropping pretty quickly if you shut the bus off without applying the parking brake and not stepping on the service brake. ie sitting flat ground where it wont roll (and NO!! you dont leave the driver seat if you do this unless the bus is FULLY CHOCKED!)..


misadjusted Slack adjusters are the most often cause of brake drag from what ive seen...



wheel bearing vs brake drag.. you should find the Hub MUCH hotter than the drum.. if the drum is roasty and the hub is cooler or somewhat close then likely brake drag.
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Old 07-04-2022, 09:43 AM   #14
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if the can is bad you'll see your pressure dropping pretty quickly if you shut the bus off without applying the parking brake and not stepping on the service brake. ie sitting flat ground where it wont roll (and NO!! you dont leave the driver seat if you do this unless the bus is FULLY CHOCKED!)..


misadjusted Slack adjusters are the most often cause of brake drag from what ive seen...



wheel bearing vs brake drag.. you should find the Hub MUCH hotter than the drum.. if the drum is roasty and the hub is cooler or somewhat close then likely brake drag.
I'll have to try this a little later on when other campers won't mind me building air pressure but it is a good tip something I haven't tried yet. And I'll put a temperature gun on the hubs, drums, tires, and brake shoes once we run on the road again. Thanks a lot for your help and suggestions.
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Old 07-04-2022, 10:25 AM   #15
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As long as your attention is focused on the rear, if you've never checked the differential lubricant level and condition now would be a good time. I'm not suggesting this could be related to your issue but the differential is often neglected and that oil lubricates the differential gears as well as the axle bearings on our buses. if you're parked on a level spot it would take a few minutes to have a look.
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Old 07-04-2022, 10:41 AM   #16
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As long as your attention is focused on the rear, if you've never checked the differential lubricant level and condition now would be a good time. I'm not suggesting this could be related to your issue but the differential is often neglected and that oil lubricates the differential gears as well as the axle bearings on our buses. if you're parked on a level spot it would take a few minutes to have a look.
Yes, and I suspect this to be low and brakes to be the problem along with a hub seal because when I bought the bus they told me they just did brakes but they also changed a wheel speed sensor cut the electrical plug off of it and twisted the wires together because I suspect they had the wrong one and the differential was wet with oil when I inquired about that is when they said they just did the brakes I suspect because the hub seal was leaking then. So I'm probably looking at a hub seal, bearing, brakes, and wheel sensor along with a differential service.
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Old 07-05-2022, 07:48 AM   #17
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Another thing with drag would be if the opposite brake was out of adjustment, you'd then have one brake doing all the work and showing hot. I find drag to be more often bad installation or hardware failure then slacks holding them on. Usually I only see slacks failing and letting the adjustment get loose.

Kind of concerning that you have this issue after they just worked on it.

Typically if a bearing is hot, it will be loud as well, and the free play will be out to lunch.
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Old 07-05-2022, 08:14 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
Another thing with drag would be if the opposite brake was out of adjustment, you'd then have one brake doing all the work and showing hot. I find drag to be more often bad installation or hardware failure then slacks holding them on. Usually I only see slacks failing and letting the adjustment get loose.

Kind of concerning that you have this issue after they just worked on it.

Typically if a bearing is hot, it will be loud as well, and the free play will be out to lunch.
Well I'm not sure if in fact I'm having an issue so far all I have is a tpms sensor telling me I have a hot tire or wheel. It could be a bad sensor we won't be leaving camp until Thursday then I'll know more if there is a problem I'm glad I have the tpms to warn me. I'm going to switch the sensor to a different wheel if the problem moves with the sensor I'll know I have a bad sensor I should mention I had an oil leak at the engine oil filter that put out a gallon of oil before I noticed it needles to say I got some free undercoating I'm wondering if some of that oil got on the brake shoes and is causing the problem but that's a good 22 feet away from the rear wheels but there is definately signs of oil back that far so this may be the problem is I have oil impregnated shoes as the shoes in question are on the same side as the oil filter. The work they did on the brakes was 3 years ago slack adjusters could be out as well. I'll have to check before we go. I appreciate your help thank you for responding.
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Old 07-08-2022, 07:07 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
Another thing with drag would be if the opposite brake was out of adjustment, you'd then have one brake doing all the work and showing hot. I find drag to be more often bad installation or hardware failure then slacks holding them on. Usually I only see slacks failing and letting the adjustment get loose.

Kind of concerning that you have this issue after they just worked on it.

Typically if a bearing is hot, it will be loud as well, and the free play will be out to lunch.
Do what I found was oil on my driver's side rear brake shoes and that was causing the passenger side rear brake shoes to do all the braking and making them overheat. Thing in not sure if now is how to let all the air out of my air bags in the rear air suspension so I can do the brake shoes and hub seals safely Imran I would imagine you would want all the air out to be safe yes ???
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Old 07-09-2022, 11:33 AM   #20
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Why do you want to let the air suspension down?

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