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Old 06-18-2021, 09:35 PM   #1
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Mechanical 466 at higher elevation

Hi folks,

Iím learning the mechanical diesel life, but I have a question. I am running a 1987 Intíl 1954 with a mechanical DT466. I live and drive around Denver CO USA (about 5000í elevation). The truck is kind of a pooch, but it does fine. Iím heading to higher elevations tomorrow, and Iím a little worried itíll flood, and not restart once shut down. I have the mechanical shut down. Im wondering it it makes sense to start cranking with the shut off actually shut off, and slowly open it until the engine fires.

What do yíall think?

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Old 06-19-2021, 01:01 AM   #2
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elevation

I worry more that the turbo will not keep up with the amount of fuel and the engine will run too hot at the exhaust temperature. run the risk of burned pistons, burned valves, over heated exhaust turbine,

I have a hot rodded cummins mechanical injection engine. I also have gages so I can watch temperatures and pressures of the intake and exhaust.

I also have a bigger turbo than original to add more air to the engine.

william
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Old 06-19-2021, 02:56 AM   #3
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Agreed.

Your concern is going to be too much fuel and not enough air while driving.

Hopefully it is tuned in such a way that your EGTs will never be too high, but you're talking about some good altitude.

If you find you're blowing a lot of black smoke, might wanna go easy on it. If you have an EGT gauge, then go for it and keep it under 1200.

I've not heard of "flooding" being an issue with diesels. Usually it just means white smoke as the diesel is vaporized and pushed out the exhaust when it's too cold to make fire.

Flooding in a gas engine is when you get to much liquid fuel in the engine and the fuel air mixture is too rich for flame. Diesels run lean (in those terms), there is almost always excess air.
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Old 06-19-2021, 06:53 AM   #4
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your engine specs will tell you maximum altitude
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Old 06-19-2021, 06:55 AM   #5
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We had our mechanical dt466 at 11,000' in the Flattops Wilderness Area in Colorado and spent a good bit of time around 8000' in other locations without issues. I doubt you'll have a problem in the warm months.
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Old 06-19-2021, 10:31 AM   #6
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You will want to down shift and back off on the throttle if your blowing black smoke. The engine HP/ torque will be effectively derated at altitude.

At altitude the engine will likely not get as much air as it would like. A diesel will pull as much air as possible through the engine and rpm /power output is regulated by the fuel rate. If there is less air available you will have to add less fuel.

It would be a good idea to make sure your air filter is clean so you are restricting air flow as little as possible. Also if the engine is intercooled clean your radiator and intercooler fins so that your air charge is as cool and dense as possible. A freshly cleaned radiator will be less likely to over heat as well.

Ted
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