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Old 03-02-2020, 08:56 PM   #1
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Diagnostic codes

Have a 2001 Thomas freight liner with 24 valve 5.9 Cummins. Getting a 278 code when it is cold then after running get 381 code. Does anyone have a link to what the codes are. I have googled everything and found codes, but these are not on list. Thanks for help!!!
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Old 03-02-2020, 11:39 PM   #2
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Year: 1998
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Engine: 5.9 Cummins 12-valve
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What about ISB Fault Codes List
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Old 03-03-2020, 12:22 AM   #3
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Heck yeah thank you!!! It had both codes on there. So I have a lift pump circuit issue and air intake heater relay circuit issue. Lift pump is going to be my issue.
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Old 03-03-2020, 12:33 AM   #4
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Year: 1998
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Engine: 5.9 Cummins 12-valve
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Many ISB's around that year model had a an issue which dealt with the lift pump. Search for Cummins campaign 0504, bulletin 4907663 for more information.
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Old 04-10-2020, 11:55 PM   #5
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Hey guys.

I just got a 2005 Thomas built bus. 5.9 24v. I drove it over 100 miles from where I bought it from to my house. Ran great! I've been running it for about 10 minutes a day while I'm working on the conversion just at idle. I noticed the warning light on the dash was on as well as the stop light. I'm unfamiliar with the built in engine diagnostic fault codes. I'm unable to find accurate fault list that correspond with my bus. Can anyone point me in the right direction? Thanks!
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Old 04-11-2020, 06:05 AM   #6
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http://www.diesel-service-parts.com/isb-fault-codes.html
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Old 04-11-2020, 06:07 AM   #7
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ISB Fault Codes List
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Old 04-12-2020, 02:53 AM   #8
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Year: 2001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joejoe View Post
I just got a 2005 Thomas built bus. 5.9 24v. I drove it over 100 miles from where I bought it from to my house. Ran great! I've been running it for about 10 minutes a day while I'm working on the conversion just at idle. I noticed the warning light on the dash was on as well as the stop light. I'm unfamiliar with the built in engine diagnostic fault codes. I'm unable to find accurate fault list that correspond with my bus. Can anyone point me in the right direction? Thanks!
Donít run the engine till you get the stop light figured out. I think thereís a way to get the dash lights to flash the code in a certain way but I canít remember off hand how. Alternately you could buy a code reader and see if it can find them; sometimes you need the special Cummins software to get all the codes I think.
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Old 04-12-2020, 09:32 AM   #9
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There's a reason for the stop engine light, intended to prevent major engine damage until a problem is corrected. Usually low oil pressure or over temperature - low coolant level will often activate it too.
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Old 05-31-2020, 11:08 PM   #10
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How do you get it to flash the code? I have been searching but havnt found anything yet.
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Old 06-01-2020, 12:28 AM   #11
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https://autobusthomas.com/wp-content...2013.01.23.pdf

Does that help?
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Old 06-01-2020, 01:19 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by aridgedell View Post
How do you get it to flash the code? I have been searching but havnt found anything yet.
If this is in reference to the 'Check Engine" light flashing to signal the stored trouble codes, that does not apply to 96+. If the flashing procedure you're referring to is what I'm thinking, it is only for non-OBD systems prior to 1996. I'm not aware of any such procedure with post-96 models.

96+ models require a scanner and the trouble codes usually are Pxxxx - where xxxx is the actual code number. P0300 would be a random misfire, P0301-P0310 would indicate a specific cylinder misfiring -- 301 is cylinder 1, 302 is cylinder 2, and so forth. And yes, there are some gas V10 engines out there built by Ford and Dodge.

The older pre-96 system, you perform these steps (DO NOT do this on 96+, you risk frying the PCM) Ford, Chrysler and GM all have different ports and therefore some are much easier with a special dongle to put the ECM in diagnostic mode. Auto parts stores can usually sell you one that's custom fit for Ford. Not sure about Dodge. It's not really required on GM if you know what you're doing.

Locate the diagnostic port.

Per the diagnostic port pinout diagram, use a paper clip or piece of wire to connect the diagnostic mode pin to the ground pin, also in the diagnostic port.

Turn ignition on, but do not start the engine.

The check engine light will start flashing in a sequence to indicate the numbers of the trouble codes stored.

One flash, a pause, then two flashes will show by default.

This is Code 12, indicating the ECM has detected no internal faults.

Three flashes, a pause, then two flashes would be code 32.
Five flashes, a pause, then four flashes would be code 53.
Four flahses, a pause, then three flashes would code 43.

It's been awhile since I did this, but if memory serves, each code will be signaled three times before moving to the next. When the last code is signaled for the final time, the whole cycle starts over again with Code 12.

BUT - this does NOT apply to OBD systems in vehicles built post-96. For those, you need a code scanner. In fact, a flashing Check Engine light on a post-96 OBD system is usually a sign of a significant misfire.
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Old 06-02-2020, 11:19 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHEESE_WAGON View Post
If this is in reference to the 'Check Engine" light flashing to signal the stored trouble codes, that does not apply to 96+. If the flashing procedure you're referring to is what I'm thinking, it is only for non-OBD systems prior to 1996. I'm not aware of any such procedure with post-96 models.

96+ models require a scanner and the trouble codes usually are Pxxxx - where xxxx is the actual code number. P0300 would be a random misfire, P0301-P0310 would indicate a specific cylinder misfiring -- 301 is cylinder 1, 302 is cylinder 2, and so forth. And yes, there are some gas V10 engines out there built by Ford and Dodge.

The older pre-96 system, you perform these steps (DO NOT do this on 96+, you risk frying the PCM) Ford, Chrysler and GM all have different ports and therefore some are much easier with a special dongle to put the ECM in diagnostic mode. Auto parts stores can usually sell you one that's custom fit for Ford. Not sure about Dodge. It's not really required on GM if you know what you're doing.

Locate the diagnostic port.

Per the diagnostic port pinout diagram, use a paper clip or piece of wire to connect the diagnostic mode pin to the ground pin, also in the diagnostic port.

Turn ignition on, but do not start the engine.

The check engine light will start flashing in a sequence to indicate the numbers of the trouble codes stored.

One flash, a pause, then two flashes will show by default.

This is Code 12, indicating the ECM has detected no internal faults.

Three flashes, a pause, then two flashes would be code 32.
Five flashes, a pause, then four flashes would be code 53.
Four flahses, a pause, then three flashes would code 43.

It's been awhile since I did this, but if memory serves, each code will be signaled three times before moving to the next. When the last code is signaled for the final time, the whole cycle starts over again with Code 12.

BUT - this does NOT apply to OBD systems in vehicles built post-96. For those, you need a code scanner. In fact, a flashing Check Engine light on a post-96 OBD system is usually a sign of a significant misfire.
Ok thanks, yes I have a 2003 with cummins 5.9, the "warning" light comes on after about 45 seconds of running, all guages look good. New battery in it and a new (reman) ecm is in it.
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