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Old 08-06-2023, 05:28 PM   #1
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The bus has a lifted roof that th PO used...

Self-tapping screws and silicon to assemble sheet metal.

Do I pull every screw and wire brush the silicone... Automotive seam seal and Pop Rivet?

or

Use thread locker on all the screws back side and trim out all the panels with which shield caulk on the edges and repaint?

Or?

Thoughts Please.

Thanks

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Old 08-06-2023, 09:02 PM   #2
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Add some pictures so we can help.
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Old 08-07-2023, 09:00 AM   #3
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All of the roof raises I've seen done were welded 16-gauge on the frame studs and riveted sheet metal. This is about the only way to do it and pretend that it still has the same structural integrity of an original bus.

Sure, you can always add some caulk to that, but drilling holes and filling them with screws isn't going to have the same rigidity or strength of a proper weld.
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Old 08-16-2023, 12:03 PM   #4
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https://share.icloud.com/photos/0e8D...n2W-5lQfGCpnMA

images of the POs work
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Old 08-16-2023, 12:36 PM   #5
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I keep seeing your threads and they make a lot more sense now.. You got any overall pics of the bird? I'm interested on what were working with here..
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Old 08-16-2023, 12:49 PM   #6
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https://share.icloud.com/photos/040H...Yjk67qKDCW4qeA
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Old 08-16-2023, 01:02 PM   #7
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No screws and definitely no silicone. That's just asking for leaks.

Seam sealer and buck rivets would be preferred. Welding would be best, but that requires a decent welder and skill set to accomplish successfully, something most DIY skoolies won't have.
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Old 08-16-2023, 01:43 PM   #8
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Thanks so are you saying pull it all apart clean the silicone and Replace the screws with rivets?
I was thinking a drop of thread lock, and seam seal with windshield dope on all the seams. Thoughts please.
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Old 08-16-2023, 02:02 PM   #9
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Yes.

Pull it all apart, clean off all silicone and anything else(paint, rust, etc) so that you have bare metal. Apply weld through primer to areas where panel and frame will contact. Buck rivet or weld the panel to frame, you can use existing holes if they work and hold the panel tight/flat. Seam seal the inside joint and you're done.

You'll have to paint the panels after. I prefer a primer then paint setup, some prefer all in one stuff. Interior you might get away with a primer/sealer product instead of painting. Interior isn't as fussy as once it's covered you'll never see it again. It just needs to be protected.


Self tappers don't respond well to thread locker products because they don't have near the thread engagement that a bolt or machine screw would have. Silicone isn't a good long term sealant, and is a nightmare when it fails and needs to be removed. There are much better products out there. Whoever did your roof raise did it the quick/cheap/easy way. If you want this to last, do it once and do it right.
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Old 08-16-2023, 02:19 PM   #10
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thanks, gonna be a lot of work
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Old 08-16-2023, 03:13 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jfmusic@me.com View Post
thanks, gonna be a lot of work
---------------------

That may have caused the previous owner to sell. Raising a new bus from scratch, with new steel, may be quicker. There would be nothing to take apart, before starting. Meanwhile the existing material is already perforated and wavy.

PO skipped all of the important steps. The wide gaps between screws have already bent waves into the sheetmetal. No way to add seam sealer IN-BETWEEN, without separating the sheets, first. Lap seals will fail.

For what use are you planning for the bus? A leaky toy hauler is fine, but a moldy sleeping quarters is not a great investment. Depending on your intentions, it may be a good time to recognize the built-in leaks and bow out. An overwhelming task can break a builder's spirit. No AC either, right?
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Old 08-16-2023, 04:49 PM   #12
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If I bury the whole thing in bed liner spray?

thoughts?
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Old 08-16-2023, 06:01 PM   #13
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Forget about the leaks, it's the modified structure that is the problem.
This bus is a prime example of why so many insurance companies will not insure a "structurally modified" bus.
Good Luck !
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Old 10-21-2023, 01:40 PM   #14
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It's interesting... From an engineering standpoint, the Screws with Locktite should be as effective as a Rivit.
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Old 10-22-2023, 06:40 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jfmusic@me.com View Post
It's interesting... From an engineering standpoint, the Screws with Locktite should be as effective as a Rivit.

No it wouldn't because there's not though metal for the threads of the screw to lock to. It's thin levels of metal which is why rivets are used, Rivets compress two thin sheets of metal together harder.



On a screw you may get 2-4 threads max actually holding it alltogether.
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Old 10-22-2023, 09:45 AM   #16
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Actually, you get 1 thread holding it at the point where it contacts for thin sheet metal.

The difference is in the amount of surface area covering more of the sheet metal in a rivet, which is a little bit better of a bite.

If thread locker can stabilize for vibration in the Automotive industry or electronics which also can be affected by heat, it can and does limit the movement of the screw against the sheet metal. The question is in percentages.

No Doubt, rivets hold on a higher percentage, that doesn’t negate screws.

If it did no one would use rivets they would only use welding.
Which again is a percentage difference between the holding power of welding or spot welding vs rivets.
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