Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-29-2019, 06:00 PM   #41
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 2,775
Quote:
Originally Posted by HazMatt View Post
Do we need a secret decoder ring to partake..?
Already slipped you one, see post #15

john61ct is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2019, 06:06 PM   #42
Bus Crazy
 
Sleddgracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: south east BC, close to the Canadian/US border
Posts: 2,265
Year: 1975
Coachwork: Chevy
Chassis: 8 window
Engine: 454 LS7
Rated Cap: 24,500
Quote:
Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
Would mean you're giving yourself a reason to go park in the windswept treeless spot instead of someplace more comfortable.

I've actually lived near various windgens, and the noise/vibration drives you nuts.

Since solar's become cheap, consumer windgen's taken a nosedive, for good reason. Load dump must be constantly running, moving mechanicals to replace, can be a violent event when stuff breaks

And a lightweight but portable tower high enough is a real feat of engineering, worth more than most buses.

But hey your rig, go for it

my passion for the last 41 years has been racing my sleddogs - to me 'good weather' involves snow and ice - as the winters have been warming up, more and more races that were being held in the south no longer even try to fight the weather, so us 'southerners' ( southern Canada that is ) have to go north in search of winter - the further north you go the shorter the daylight - we are often parked on a bald prairie where the stunted trees are bent over at the knees from the prevailing wind, or at the shore of a frozen lake where the wind creates waves in the snow - seems to me a wind generator only makes sense - if it's too disturbing during the night I'll lower the mast - that way it will only be generating for 18 hrs per day - it's not like we'll be sitting around inside the conversion for many hours during the day, but a place to warm up and have a hot cuppa is going to feel good to my ancient bones - lol
Sleddgracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2019, 06:09 PM   #43
Bus Crazy
 
Sleddgracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: south east BC, close to the Canadian/US border
Posts: 2,265
Year: 1975
Coachwork: Chevy
Chassis: 8 window
Engine: 454 LS7
Rated Cap: 24,500
Quote:
Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
Would mean you're giving yourself a reason to go park in the windswept treeless spot instead of someplace more comfortable.

I've actually lived near various windgens, and the noise/vibration drives you nuts.

Since solar's become cheap, consumer windgen's taken a nosedive, for good reason. Load dump must be constantly running, moving mechanicals to replace, can be a violent event when stuff breaks

And a lightweight but portable tower high enough is a real feat of engineering, worth more than most buses.

But hey your rig, go for it

a wind generator something like this is what I have in mind

https://www.amazon.ca/Happybuy-Turbi...52824219&psc=1
Sleddgracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2019, 06:14 PM   #44
Bus Crazy
 
Sleddgracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: south east BC, close to the Canadian/US border
Posts: 2,265
Year: 1975
Coachwork: Chevy
Chassis: 8 window
Engine: 454 LS7
Rated Cap: 24,500
I plan on having a cargo rack that lifts to the top of the bus, or down again, powered by hydraulics or 12v - a wind generator can be set up there 14' in the air, and if I want to lower it, I'll press a button or pull a lever and up or down it will go - the dog sleds will go along for the ride

(but first I have to get my cc working so I can get a (**^&%^%$$^&* bus! )
Sleddgracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2019, 06:29 PM   #45
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 2,775
Wow OK, then maybe it's worth it for you, both windswept landscape, and especially reduced insolation so far north.

For me the windy spots are the last choice, a nice grassy field, shady side, tucked up against the forest edge's where I like.

You have fewer choices up there, by choice

Also look at the marine (yachting) world, designed compact robust, not cheap.

But TBH a genset or two and LFP is easy and reliable, and maximize you alternator output when driving.

Do not bother with a spendy fancy lead bank, won't last. I posted my Deka blurb right?

And do not discard solar for when less windy, yes slower ROI but take what you can get, multiple sources all contribute to the overall.
john61ct is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2019, 06:40 PM   #46
Bus Crazy
 
Sleddgracer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: south east BC, close to the Canadian/US border
Posts: 2,265
Year: 1975
Coachwork: Chevy
Chassis: 8 window
Engine: 454 LS7
Rated Cap: 24,500
Quote:
Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
Wow OK, then maybe it's worth it for you.

For me the windy spots are the last choice, a nice grassy field, shady size tucked up against the forest edge were I like.

You have fewer choices up there, by choice

Also look at the marine (yachting) world, designed compact robust, not cheap.

But TBH a genset or two and LFP is easy and reliable, and maximize you alternator output when driving.

Do not bother with a spendy fancy lead bank, won't last. I posted my Deka blurb right?
I have a small gas powered generator, enough to power a coffee pot at least, and a quick battery charge in an emergency - I plan on a couple of big new deep cell batteries, LED lighting where practical, propane furnace, stove, and what ever ETC comes up that can be run off propane - think cozy cabin in the woods rather than a Caribbean resort - lol ( one reason we park next to the lake shore or open field is because it takes too many handlers to get a team of eager dogs to the start line if you're parked too far away - sled dogs come first before personal comfort
Sleddgracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2019, 01:41 AM   #47
Bus Crazy
 
bus-bro's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Whidbey Island, WA.
Posts: 1,109
Year: 1984
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: All American
Engine: 3208 na boat anchor
Rated Cap: 2
That vertical rotor windmill that you linked to Sleddgracer is cool conceptually. What they sell might not work out so great though.
I think a full length bus might make a great platform for the right windmill. We just need some out of the box thinker to try.
bus-bro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2019, 09:15 AM   #48
Bus Nut
 
CMORGANSKOOL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Philadelpiha Pennsylvania
Posts: 397
Year: 2007
Coachwork: IC
Chassis: FE Bus
Engine: DT-466 7.6L Turbo Diesel
Rated Cap: 77
How to calculate your solar needs for Dummies.

here's an easy way to calculate your battery requirements


volts times amp hours give you watt hours.
100ah battleborn LiFePo4 is 100 amps at 12v so it's 1200 watt hours.

You take your appliances so say your fridge uses 100 watts and runs 10 hours a day. 100x10 is 1000 watt hours. That means you would need one 100ah battery to power your fridge. Remember, with lead acid and AGM batteries you have to cut the total capacity in half as only 50% of the capacity is usable without damaging the cell. Lithium and LIfepo4 can use 80% of their capacity. So 100ah lead acid or agm has a usable capacity of 50ah. Once you figure out how many watt hours you need for a battery bank you can then build your solar and charge controller to match.

Solar is measured in watts, and your charge controller is rated in amps.
100 watts/12v is 8.33 amps. Each panel you wire in parallel adds 8.33 amps, so you can run 3 100w panels on a 30 amp controller.

Lastly you have to size your wire based off of the amps your wires will carry and the length they're carrying that power. Failure to use large enough cables will produce heat and possible fires.

Here's a link to a wire size calculator.
https://www.wirebarn.com/Wire-Calculator-_ep_41.html
CMORGANSKOOL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2019, 04:37 PM   #49
New Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Texas
Posts: 3
Year: 1996
Coachwork: Blue bird
Chassis: T/C 2000
Engine: Cummins Turbo Diesel
Rated Cap: 16
If you are going to charge house batteries, you should look at something like this: Renogy 200A Battery Isolator Compatible with Lead-acid Batteries https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07JQ98RQJ..._rSlppDy34NU9P
Margieandmark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2019, 05:02 PM   #50
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Mt Vernon, WA
Posts: 523
Year: 1996
Coachwork: Bluebird, Collins
Chassis: G30 Bluebird Microbird, E350 Shuttle Bus
Engine: 1995 Chevrolet 350, 1992 Ford 460
JDontheGo That is a great sounding energy system!. Is there a thread on it? Thanks
Doktari is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2019, 06:28 PM   #51
Bus Geek
 
o1marc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Dawsonville, Ga.
Posts: 10,482
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Genesis
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/3060
Rated Cap: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Margieandmark View Post
If you are going to charge house batteries, you should look at something like this: Renogy 200A Battery Isolator Compatible with Lead-acid Batteries https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07JQ98RQJ..._rSlppDy34NU9P
It talks of charging separate BANKS of batteries , but then talks about charging individual batteries to you needs. Is it one or the other? I don't understand how it could do both.
o1marc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2019, 06:42 PM   #52
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 2,775
Each set of batteries (banks) that have different voltage requirements needs a separate charger.

Sterling Ultra Pro series have an add-on gizmo that is that in effect.

DC-DC charger is a good solution.

But chargers with multiple bank outputs all deliver the same profile at the same time to each.
john61ct is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2019, 08:48 PM   #53
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: Mt Vernon, WA
Posts: 523
Year: 1996
Coachwork: Bluebird, Collins
Chassis: G30 Bluebird Microbird, E350 Shuttle Bus
Engine: 1995 Chevrolet 350, 1992 Ford 460
Thanks, Iíll look up the Sterling ultra pro. A old fashioned battery isolator wonít do the job Iím trying to do which is having Li-ion house and lead acid starting batteries.
For the Lithium charge/discharge I thought I could do the external BMS system for Tesla or Nissan Leaf battery modules but have hit a wall with it. It gets into a lot of electronics networking technojargon. But I think I may have found a quality and affordable external bms (battery management system for Li-ion). Its a European brand called Energus. I showed the specs to a battery engineer and he said it looks good. And hundreds less than Orion, Batrium, or REC domestically made BMS systems. Though I may go with these yet for domestic customer support.
Doktari is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2019, 08:58 PM   #54
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 271
Calculate the wattage needed. Google has calculators toFigure all that
Dirtdoctor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2019, 09:30 PM   #55
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 2,775
Yes Energus is well regarded
john61ct is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.