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Old 11-28-2021, 08:46 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 31
Year: 2005
Chassis: Thomas (37 ft)
Engine: 5.9 Cummins
Mounting Solar

I've been scouring the internet on the best way to mount my solar panels. I currently have 4 170w panels measuring 58.3" x 26.4" x 1.38". Although I would like to add two more in the future. I'm trying to keep that in my plans because what I'm going for isn't going to be easily changed once it's made.

I found and fell in love with the way this blog has tiltable panels: https://www.buslifeadventure.com/tip...t-solar-panels

However, I'm wondering if their support system is strong enough? Just piano hinges and some L brackets?

So, my tweaks to their lovely plan go as follows:
1) Build an angle iron frame (to include room for the extra 2 panels I don't have yet) to go around all the panels because I don't trust their stock aluminum frame to hold up in transit.
2) Bolt the panels together within the frame, and to the frame (duh)
This is where I'm iffy
3) Bolt 4 sets of superstrut into the ribs of the bus along the same lines where the solar panels from that blog are bolted in
4) Bolt the attachments for the finger nuts onto each outer strut on the roof in accordance with the attachment on the angle iron frame. Maybe put 1 or 2 in the center for added stability because mine will be a lot longer than the blogs.
5) Pinao hinge or something of the like bolted to the struts towards the center of the bus, as well as the angle iron frame.
6) Bolt the gas struts to the bus along a rib as well as to the angle iron frame, one on each side.

How does that look to everyone? Its almost entirely the same concept, just with the panels bolted into superstruts bolted into the ribs of the bus, rather than just the panels themselves bolted into the ribs of the bus. And adding more of a frame as well.

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Old 11-28-2021, 09:37 PM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 1,088
Year: 1990
Coachwork: integral
Chassis: Crown Supercoach II (rear engine)
Engine: Detroit 6V92TAC, DDEC 2, Jake brake, Allison HT740
Rated Cap: 37,400 lbs GVWR
I have eight 255W panels that are individually tiltable, divided into two arrays of four panels each. Each panel is mounted in a frame of 1.75" x 1.75" x 1/8" 6063 angle; each frame is hinged with stainless hinges to a central walkway that runs between my two roof hatches, and each panel is supported by two stainless telescoping struts that can raise the panels to level, 21, 33 or 45 degrees up. The struts are hinged and pivot at either end, and their lower ends slide in an aluminum T-track that runs parallel to the walkway but close to the outer edge of the roof; this ensures that the struts see no torsional or bending loads at all. The struts use stainless snap buttons for each height setting, and can be easily raised or lowered by hand without tools when I stand on a 6-foot step ladder. The central walkway and the sliding T-track are all through-bolted to the roof ribs with stainless bolts and nylok nuts, and there are two quick-connect outlets for washdown water under the walkway so I can easily and safely wash the panels whenever they need cleaning. When the panels are stowed down against the roof for travel they are at 21 degrees down, and they are secured by locks that prevent any movement while traveling. It was a lot of work to do all this, but the results are worth it!

I strongly suggest mounting each panel in its own support frame, otherwise their combined weight will be much too heavy to raise by hand. Piano hinge is a useful way to make hinges of the exact size needed, but it should be stainless, as should be all fasteners. All metal should be aluminum or SS for corrosion resistance and to avoid needing to be painted.

Good luck, John
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Old 11-28-2021, 10:12 PM   #3
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 31
Year: 2005
Chassis: Thomas (37 ft)
Engine: 5.9 Cummins
I'm also considering putting the struts along the outside and the latches along the shorter sides instead
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Old 11-28-2021, 10:13 PM   #4
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 31
Year: 2005
Chassis: Thomas (37 ft)
Engine: 5.9 Cummins
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iceni John View Post
I have eight 255W panels that are individually tiltable, divided into two arrays of four panels each. Each panel is mounted in a frame of 1.75" x 1.75" x 1/8" 6063 angle; each frame is hinged with stainless hinges to a central walkway that runs between my two roof hatches, and each panel is supported by two stainless telescoping struts that can raise the panels to level, 21, 33 or 45 degrees up. The struts are hinged and pivot at either end, and their lower ends slide in an aluminum T-track that runs parallel to the walkway but close to the outer edge of the roof; this ensures that the struts see no torsional or bending loads at all. The struts use stainless snap buttons for each height setting, and can be easily raised or lowered by hand without tools when I stand on a 6-foot step ladder. The central walkway and the sliding T-track are all through-bolted to the roof ribs with stainless bolts and nylok nuts, and there are two quick-connect outlets for washdown water under the walkway so I can easily and safely wash the panels whenever they need cleaning. When the panels are stowed down against the roof for travel they are at 21 degrees down, and they are secured by locks that prevent any movement while traveling. It was a lot of work to do all this, but the results are worth it!

I strongly suggest mounting each panel in its own support frame, otherwise their combined weight will be much too heavy to raise by hand. Piano hinge is a useful way to make hinges of the exact size needed, but it should be stainless, as should be all fasteners. All metal should be aluminum or SS for corrosion resistance and to avoid needing to be painted.

Good luck, John
Do you happen to have photos of your set up? It would be alot easier for me to process if I could see it. Sounds like a really solid build tho!
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Old 11-29-2021, 12:41 PM   #5
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 1,088
Year: 1990
Coachwork: integral
Chassis: Crown Supercoach II (rear engine)
Engine: Detroit 6V92TAC, DDEC 2, Jake brake, Allison HT740
Rated Cap: 37,400 lbs GVWR
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daybreakbus View Post
Do you happen to have photos of your set up? It would be alot easier for me to process if I could see it. Sounds like a really solid build tho!
Sorry, no photos (I'm photographically challenged!), but here are two YouTube videos that show my bus. The first video is from one of our annual get-togethers a few years ago, and it shows the panels' support frames in place but before I installed the panels into them. My bus is the third one leaving:
The second video shows last year's get-together, and my bus is visible at 5:00, 12:42 and 13:26. It's best to slow the replay speed to 0.25 to more easily stop the video. The left array's front panel is raised to 21 degrees up, a good angle for summer insolation:
I hope these videos give you some idea of what I made. Watch all of the second video - that was a fun day!

John
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Old 11-29-2021, 05:27 PM   #6
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Southern Indiana
Posts: 35
Year: 2001
Chassis: Blue Bird TC2000
Engine: Cummins 24V 5.9/ Allison 2500
We did our solar panels they way they did in that blog!

We ended up with 4 panels per array rather than the 3 in the blog you mentioned. Ours are the Renogy Eclipse panels, which I think are what is shown in that blog. (40.9 x 21 inches) They are heavy to raise by hand only, but no problem with the gas struts. We ended up using 2 40 lb struts per 4 panel array and that seems to work nicely. We’ve only driven about 2k miles with this setup but it’s going nicely so far.

I will add that the gas struts push the arrays outward when they are lowered to the roof, and that caused some issues with the alignment of our fingernut-to-array fastener holes. The panel mount holes are about 1/4” out of alignment now… Still have to figure out the best way to deal with that.
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Old 12-13-2021, 10:31 AM   #7
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2021
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 31
Year: 2005
Chassis: Thomas (37 ft)
Engine: 5.9 Cummins
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iceni John View Post
Sorry, no photos (I'm photographically challenged!), but here are two YouTube videos that show my bus. The first video is from one of our annual get-togethers a few years ago, and it shows the panels' support frames in place but before I installed the panels into them. My bus is the third one leaving:
The second video shows last year's get-together, and my bus is visible at 5:00, 12:42 and 13:26. It's best to slow the replay speed to 0.25 to more easily stop the video. The left array's front panel is raised to 21 degrees up, a good angle for summer insolation:
I hope these videos give you some idea of what I made. Watch all of the second video - that was a fun day!

John
I think I have a grasp of everything but the telescoping struts and the snaps. Is there anyway you could explain that further or maybe even send links to all the parts you used so I can try and piece it together? The videos aren't close enough to see how it's put together. And I'm having trouble understanding how they lay flat
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Old 01-08-2022, 03:42 AM   #8
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Freedom Field, NM
Posts: 26
Year: 2005
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Saf-T-Liner HDX
Engine: Cat C7 7.3L
Rated Cap: 90 Passenger
I made my solar mounting modular by creating two parallel unistrut rails.

Its bolted through the ribs and I used hockey pucks as stand offs so the panels can span over the roof curve.

This design minimizes roof penetrations and allows me to completely change my panels without modifying the roof again.

The bolts and pucks are sealed with sikaflex 221.

I just mounted my panels on the roof but haven't got pictures of it yet.



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