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Old 09-29-2023, 06:26 AM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2023
Posts: 34
Studor tank vent

Anybody use a studor valve vent to vent grey- black tanks?http://www.studor.net

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Old 09-29-2023, 07:18 AM   #2
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Mar 2022
Location: Middle TN
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Year: 2008
Chassis: IC RE (PB30500)
Engine: Maxxforce DT
Those seem very specialized and a little out of what I'm willing to pay for just removing smells.

My current plan is to take a vapor canister off of a vehicle in a junkyard and run that inline on my vent hose to block smells. Vapor canisters are filled with activated charcoal to absorb fuel vapors, but that activated charcoal is excellent for removing smells. They are only about $15 and located on every vehicle. Avoid ones with an electrical connection, they have internal solenoids that require a 12v signal to open and let air through.
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Old 09-29-2023, 07:25 AM   #3
Bus Crazy
 
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Those work well in applications where you need to vent a P-trap or drain, so that the suction (negative pressure) as the water flows can pull air into the pipe and not create a vacuum in the drains. In a house, this is done with a pipe to the roof. In some installations, like a kitchen island, the Studor valves work well to let air into that piping so that the sink draining doesn't cause a vacuum.

The Studors are one-way "air admittance" valves, to let air into the system but not let air out. You wouldn't want stinky sewer gasses escaping beneath your kitchen island, so they block that. So, they would not work well for a gray or black tank vent because they wouldn't prevent the tank from pressurizing. For tank venting, you really only need a pipe that's open to the outside somewhere. You can vent up, to the roof, or out the side or even beneath your bus...with the caution that venting below or to the side can be smelly.
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Old 09-29-2023, 10:43 AM   #4
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rossvtaylor View Post
Those work well in applications where you need to vent a P-trap or drain, so that the suction (negative pressure) as the water flows can pull air into the pipe and not create a vacuum in the drains. In a house, this is done with a pipe to the roof. In some installations, like a kitchen island, the Studor valves work well to let air into that piping so that the sink draining doesn't cause a vacuum.

The Studors are one-way "air admittance" valves, to let air into the system but not let air out. You wouldn't want stinky sewer gasses escaping beneath your kitchen island, so they block that. So, they would not work well for a gray or black tank vent because they wouldn't prevent the tank from pressurizing. For tank venting, you really only need a pipe that's open to the outside somewhere. You can vent up, to the roof, or out the side or even beneath your bus...with the caution that venting below or to the side can be smelly.
Agreed. A couple of other points. The vent lets air into and out of the tank as it empties and fills.

The vent pipe should connect at or near the top of the tank so the vent is not blocked with liquid or sludge. The end of the vent pipe should be higher than the max liquid level in the tank-be sure to take into account having the bus on a steep hill or slope.

The vent pipe should be big enough to allow the tank to drain quickly, but you might experiment with vent pipe sizes. A smaller vent pipe might be just fine.

The vent pipe also doesn't need to be rigid. Flex pipe might help with routing the line up to the roof (ideal location for the vent for smells).
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