Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-08-2022, 01:27 PM   #1
New Member
 
floridatoalaska's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 2
Year: 2005
Rated Cap: 72
A Wood Stove For Extreme Cold

My husband and I have been looking at wood stoves for our full sized Thomas. The inside should be about 300 square feet. Iíve seen that most people opt for the miniature wood stoves, but we plan on being parked in Alaska next year and I know the area regularly gets to -20 degrees F. Is a miniature wood stove going to put out enough warmth to be our main source of heat? Should we opt for slightly bigger? Any recommendations?

floridatoalaska is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2022, 05:06 PM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
Drew Bru's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Grayson County, VA
Posts: 1,392
Year: 1996
Coachwork: Amtran
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466
Rated Cap: 65
You'll want something bigger. We have the Grizzly, it did okay in our full size bus down to the teens but it wouldn't have handled what you're going to be facing. It also requires reloading of wood on an hourly basis. We ended up using it for daytime heat with a diesel heater for overnight.
__________________
Our Build: https://dazzlingbluebus.wordpress.com/
Drew Bru is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2022, 05:31 PM   #3
Mini-Skoolie
 
beachtomountains's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 28
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Gillig
Chassis: Phantom
Engine: 50's series Detroit
Agreed with previous reply, just wanted to add that if you're going to be stationary in those temps for awhile you want to think about how much time and energy you're going to devote to chopping wood down to the size you'll need to fit into your stove of choice. The minis lose their appeal very quickly with the work needed to fuel them. Side note, I've seen lots of good deals on larger size stoves on Craigslist and FB marketplace. You could always switch to a mini later if you start traveling after your Alaska stint.
beachtomountains is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2022, 08:24 PM   #4
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: VA, Clarke & Greene Counties
Posts: 266
Year: 2001
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: VIN = 1T7HR3B2311090770
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: ~72
Quote:
Originally Posted by floridatoalaska View Post
My husband and I have been looking at wood stoves for our full sized Thomas. The inside should be about 300 square feet. Iíve seen that most people opt for the miniature wood stoves, but we plan on being parked in Alaska next year and I know the area regularly gets to -20 degrees F. Is a miniature wood stove going to put out enough warmth to be our main source of heat? Should we opt for slightly bigger? Any recommendations?
From my research about them and my intent to have a tightly sealed bus with 3" of closed cell about everywhere, pains taken to avoid thermal bridging -- you'd need two of those mini-stoves to be comfortable. What are your plans for skirting? For keeping any under floor tanks from freezing? For keeping down radiative and convective losses out of the living area through the big glass in the front? Are you keeping the original windows at all? I'm only keeping the originals in the driving area, the rest are mostly wall and the new windows are triple glazed.

From your description of the temperatures, depending on skirting and wind, you might need two of the diesel heaters. You are about 40 degrees below the coldest I need to plan for in VA as a general rule -- I only see below 20degF overnight about 2 weeks total of the year, and negative F maybe I see that once a decade and -20 never.

I hate to phrase it this way, but can you afford to build a sheet metal box and ducting to enclose a regular wood stove and duct air to it from the bus and back, while protecting over all from weather? Covering the metal and ducting with fiberglass batts? Kind of an external boiler wood furnace but air handling instead of hydronic? I'd want to do that and have the wood stove stuffed to the gills and damped a bit before retiring for the night. Surely if such can heat a 2400sq ft home in WV (the situation I am remembering) with temps regularly in the single digits and windy, it can heat a 300sqft bus.
TaliaDPerkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2022, 04:08 PM   #5
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2021
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 132
Year: 2003
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466e
Rated Cap: 77
Those tiny stoves are way too small for sub-zero weather. Making firewood is painful and it's dangerous too! Check out a wood pellet stove, they do require 110v to operate though. Life would be much easier and safer with a pellet stove!


A pair of diesel heaters would be great as well.

John
Timeline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2022, 06:57 PM   #6
Bus Crazy
 
HamSkoolie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2021
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 1,334
Year: 1996
Coachwork: AmTran (Now Navistar)
Engine: DT444E (7.3L) International
Rated Cap: 31,800 pounds
Don't forget to check in with Insurance agencies to see if you can even get insurance with a wood stove installed.

And unless you're willing to risk a total loss followed by a denial of coverage, don't even think about hiding the fact that you have a wood stove from the insurance agent/broker/company.
__________________
YouTube: HAMSkoolie WEB: HAMSkoolie.com
We've done so much, for so long, with so little, we now do the impossible, overnight, with nothing. US Marines -- 6531, 3521. . . .Ret ASE brakes & elect. Ret (auto and aviation mech). Extra Class HAM, NAUI/PADI OpenWater diver
HamSkoolie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2022, 11:00 AM   #7
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Apr 2020
Location: Northern California (Sacramento)
Posts: 995
Year: 1999
Coachwork: El Dorado Fiberglass
Chassis: Ford E450
Engine: V10 Gas
Welcome to the forum.

Use the search box in the upper right corner to find other conversations about wood stoves-there are a lot of them, and a lot of good information.

Also, feel free to complete your profile, which helps people know what rig you have.

Are you still building your bus?
Rucker is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
alaska, cold weather, cubic mini, heat source, wood stove

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.