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Old 10-03-2020, 08:29 PM   #1
Skoolie
 
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ac advice

My ac compressor went out. I was lucky enough to get a complete system of the same type and want to retrofit it into my bus. The compressors are not the same type But the rest of the two systems are. I need to the best way to store while I get the time to do the work. What do I need to to the compressors, evaporators and condensers for the next few weeks?




thanks Joe

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Old 10-03-2020, 10:25 PM   #2
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Plug off the lines to keep dirt, bugs and water out. You will need to replace the receiver dehydrator regardless of what you do.
Jack
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Old 10-03-2020, 10:39 PM   #3
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I Agree with Trunt. I rollef up pieces of clean paper towels/rags and put in every open connection like a cork. Then I cut the fingertips off latex gloves and used them over the fittings. I figured that technique was a little redundant but would assure my lines wouldn't get contaminated while sitting.
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Old 10-03-2020, 10:49 PM   #4
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Even if you capped off the lines or not, I would flush out everything with AC flush before putting it back together since you said the compressor has failed. Unless the compressor is simply not receiving power or the clutch coil is broken, the system is now full of metal and junk. Even still you probably don't know the exact history of both systems, someone may have been cheap or lazy with a prior failure that left debris in the system. And be prepared to go through a lot of flush, I've gone through as many as 8 quarts of flush on a single system.
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Old 10-04-2020, 06:38 AM   #5
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pretty much what everyone else saod.. if the new evaporators you just got are not part of the compressor failure you still will wanbt to cap them off then flush them out before you use them.. and always replace the receiver / drier (most its attached to the condenser).. if you dont have one you'll want to add one,,



im a little bit confused.. did your bus already have A/C and the compressor went out? or is the failed compressor part of what you removed from the other bus?


if your bus has a failed A/C then you'll want to take apart the fittings at the evaporator and condenbser and flush each coil individually.. and then flush each line individually.. replace with new O-rings on the fittings you unscrewed and replace with fresh refrigerant oil.. if your systems were Trans /AIR they likely have a label on them with the amounbt of oil you need in the complete system..


if it doesnt have a label for the oil you may be able to get the full oil charge amount by calling the installer (Trans / AIR is still in business and will have systems by VIN).. if its a carrier installed by Transartic they are also still in business and will have the systems listed by VIN..


if all that fails I install 8oz of oil and have never had issues.. (this assumes an ear mount TM16 or sanden SD7 style compressor).. a system with 2 evaporatorsa and 1 condensor(1 compressor) I install 10oz oil.


remember treat each compressor and circuit as asingle system.. so those oil amounts I gave are for per system ..


DONT flush the compressor.. however I always try and pour the oil out of a used compressor while im spinning it by hand (the inner ring).. it igves me an analysis.. if that oil comes out clear.. POE oil is generally clear or possible a clear fluorescent green if it has tracer dye in it.. if you pour your compressor oil out and its orange / honey or grey then it means that compressor is not long for this world.. its slowly throwing off metals into its oil..



Personally I dont re-install many used compressors.. I really hate to do it. when a compressor costs a couple hundred bucks for a standard sanden SD7 enhanced ear mount compressor I use brand new ones..


Bus air conditioners are used and abused.. rarely do schools ever clean the coils.. they might change a filter inside if lucky.. when the system gets a leak they often just top the charge off meaning they get run with low oil, air in the lines.. they stuff in that stop leak crap over and over thinking it will fix it..



A/C'd busses are bought sand run in the hottest states where the system is always running near capacity.. head pressure higher etc..



ive just seen too many times where a quick repair turns into a busted compressor..



I use genuine Sanden brand SD7 enhanced compressors unless I need a bigger one like a TM21 or TM35 then I use genuine Valeo / selttec branded compressors..



some of the flat nose front engine blue-birds used the old GMC frigidaire style A6 compressors (any of you into classic cars will recognize them from the 60's cars of GM and some of the 70s cars of Ford)
-Christopher
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Old 10-04-2020, 07:54 PM   #6
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Thanks for the advice. My rear system didn't work at all. The front system cooled but the clutch started to make racket when the it was off like a bearing going bad. I removed the belt so it didn't lock up and take other stuff on the front of the engine out. I figure now is a good time to put the newer unit on the back wall above the door and replace the other components and get both ac's running. cadillackid would these be the best solution to extend the lines? https://buspartexperts.com/products/...5d75875b&_ss=r this is the compressor that is on the bus now https://buspartexperts.com/collectio...a6-replacement is this the best option ?
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Old 10-04-2020, 10:07 PM   #7
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Those splices work ok, not the greatest but they do work and are used by many manufacturers to build AC systems for buses and other applications. When I worked for a bus company I used them in repairing AC systems. They are very difficult to push into the hoses, and need a crimping tool. I use CV boot crimpers with the center piece removed. If I had the option and felt like removing the entire hose, I would look around for a hydraulic fitting store to build me a new hose with nice crimps like what your car uses.
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Old 10-05-2020, 03:42 AM   #8
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That splice will also require clips and a cage abs then you use a special plier like tool to crimp it. It most likely is designed for reduced diameter barrier hose like good year galaxy 4890

The difference being that newer hose has a smaller outer diameter to be easier routed . If your hoses have the traditional car like collar style crimp fittings then it’s standard barrier hose, if the fittings each have a little cage that retains 2 crimp clamps then you likely have reduced barrier hose.

The hose should have some type of markings on it to see what it is.

Compressors .. the picture is an A6 style compressor. There are conversion kits to convert those to a sanden or seltec style, but I just look for a reputable brand and stay with the a6.

If your bad compressor is just the clutch, in many cases you can replace just the clutch. Sometimes the bars rings go bad or a spring-metal part breaks etc.. but the compressor itself is still good. The clutch can be changed without compressor or freon removal.
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Old 10-09-2020, 08:32 PM   #9
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Thanks for the advice. Doing some googling I found this place https://coldhose.com/under-dash-systems.html they have an informative site and they are right down the road from me.
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