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Old 01-29-2017, 08:43 PM   #1
Skoolie
 
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Kimberly Wood Stove - Secondary heat capture?

I am curious if anyone is actively working on or have worked on secondary heat capture from a stove like the Kimberly. Or for that matter any stove, but for me specifically I am looking at a Kimberly.

I am wondering how difficult it would be to install a heat transfer assembly that would heat water for our radiant floors? Seems like it would not be hard to wrap a few coils of copper around the hot box and pipe it into the floor system controls via a closed loop (with pressure safety of course). I suspect that convection of the water would move the hot to cold or I can use a pump.

Thoughts?
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Old 01-31-2017, 11:59 AM   #2
Skoolie
 
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I don't have a ready example, but wood stoves are often used with heater cores to produce hot water in the manner you suggest. Passive circulation is usually enough to move the water when you have a reservoir right next to the stove. I think you would probably want a pump if you have a hydronic heating system. Your stove (the hottest part of the loop) would be above the floor (the coldest part of the loop), so the natural motion of the water would cause heat to simply rise to the top of that loop and sit there - at your stove. The hot water would have no reason to sink to the bottom of that loop without a pump pushing it.

Other than that, I don't know why you couldn't put a heat pickup coil of some kind on a Kimberly. I know there are some types of woodstoves that come with integrated water heating cores, though the brand escapes me at the moment.
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Old 02-01-2017, 02:52 PM   #3
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While doing some additional research, I found this company. Looks like an interesting product. Not sure how it would work with a gasification stove as you cannot steal too much heat from the stove and it still operate efficiently. I am wondering if this could be inserted into the exhaust path and capture less heat but ensure the stover operates at optimum efficiency.

Therma-coil wood stove domestic hot water heat transfer coil

Traditional thermal transfer coils for stoves run on the outside and capture radiant heat, which is far less efficient, but does not pull heat from the combustion chamber. The enticing idea I see with this product is the ability customize how much transfer area you have inside the stove. With a super hot combustion chamber, you can expose just a small amount of tubing to the water and transfer a lot of heat to the water system. Though I do worry about the safety aspect of pressure building. I suspect I will have multiple blow off valves in the system for pressure, so it should be fine though I guess.

I like the idea that the water would heat faster as well. A direct fire heat source vs radiant coil has to mean faster heating time for the loop system.
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Old 02-01-2017, 04:50 PM   #4
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Oh my that thermacoil lookin mighty fine lol
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