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Old 03-31-2020, 06:59 AM   #1
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Modify Cubic Mini so that Chimney is off to one corner to make a cook top.

Hi,

We have been looking at wood stoves, and keep getting drawn back to the cubic mini. The one thing that is holding us back and keeps us looking is the lack of a sufficient cooktop due to the chimney being smack dab where the frying pan would go.

Other stoves have a large enough surface on top to set a frying pan. And the available cooking surface is an obvious requirement to save on energy and stress of having a second heated surface in the bus.

Is it simple enough to cut off the chimney from its position in the center of the stove and move it off to one corner? I havent seen a cubic mini up close, and photos of the inside are a bit scarce. But this seems like the obvious choice for how to get the cook top without having to resort to a lesser stove.

What are your thoughts?
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Old 03-31-2020, 07:25 AM   #2
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This is pretty unlikely to say the least. If you have the fabrication skills (cutting, welding, high-temperature painting etc.) to do this, you could more easily build your own stove from scratch (which is something people do do). As this diagram shows:

https://calorimetri.com/wp-content/u...lyticstove.png

a wood stove is more than a simple box.
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Old 03-31-2020, 09:36 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
This is pretty unlikely to say the least. If you have the fabrication skills (cutting, welding, high-temperature painting etc.) to do this, you could more easily build your own stove from scratch (which is something people do do). As this diagram shows:

https://calorimetri.com/wp-content/u...lyticstove.png

a wood stove is more than a simple box.
Well, the cutting and welding seems simple enough. I just don’t have any reference for what is under the chimney, and if any other working parts are involved. Is it just a piece of pipe welded to a flat plate? Or is there something else there? I’m also a bit curious how much it would effect the burn efficiency to move he chimney away from center.

I don’t really want to have to deal with fabricating the whole thing from scratch, though it may be what I resort to in order to get a good cook top.
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Old 03-31-2020, 10:08 AM   #4
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"I’m also a bit curious how much it would effect the burn efficiency to move he chimney away from center."

Yes, there will be an effect -- how much?
How long's a piece of rope?
Chimney placement is not random... Research how a burn-box works. Then find or build one that's suitable for what you want.
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Old 03-31-2020, 12:36 PM   #5
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Leave chimney as is for proper combustion and exhausting. Just increase the top of the stove with 1/4" steel plate cut to suit, but make sure it is all really stable. Cooking accident wouldn't be fun.


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Old 03-31-2020, 01:02 PM   #6
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Many wood stoves are designed in such a way to direct airflow along the glass door and through the stove in a particular manner to help keep the glass clean and the fire burning efficiently.

Relocating the flue pipe could disrupt this and make for a stove that is not as efficient and harder to keep clean.

Emphasis on "Could"
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Old 03-31-2020, 02:34 PM   #7
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Here is what the inside top of the Cubic Mini looks like. Doesn't appear to be a simple case of relocating a hole to the side.

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Old 04-01-2020, 09:27 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by ermracing View Post
Here is what the inside top of the Cubic Mini looks like. Doesn't appear to be a simple case of relocating a hole to the side.

Thanks ermracing. That helps clear up that question. Are those fire bricks on the inside lining there?
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Old 04-01-2020, 10:32 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Truffles View Post
Thanks ermracing. That helps clear up that question. Are those fire bricks on the inside lining there?
Its vermiculite panels, they're pretty fragile. Almost like styrofoam. I can fit an 8" cast iron skillet on ours. Also a percolator. I think a 10" skillet would fit but it would hang off a bit and might heat unevenly. Our 12" cast iron is very precarious so I use that on the range.

I think the 1/4" steel plate idea is probably the simplest solution, you can even notch out for the chimney so it slides right on to get a good transfer of heat. When not in use, store it elsewhere if space is a concern.
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Old 04-08-2020, 05:45 PM   #10
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Hi Truffles,

I hear the Cubic Mini is a great stove. I have also been looking around for small wood burning stoves and have regularly heard of the G stove. It’s stainless, so heat retention definitely won’t be on par with the Mini, but it’s quite small and has tons of accessories like a hot water tank and even a small chimney oven.

It is apparently a pretty good little stove, with the bonus of being able to use ~14-16” wood as opposed to ~5-6” wood with the Mini. Just a thought!

https://gstove-canada.com/

Apparently that’s their supplier for North America.
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