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Old 09-30-2018, 08:52 PM   #1
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Need A Propane Lesson

Need a quick lesson on propane.

I need to power 4 things on propane one 42K BTU RV Furnace, one blue flame 30K BTU wall heater and two water heaters at 38K BTU ea, not everything will be on at the same time.

I have seen many factory built RV's with rubber hose's all leading back to some kind of block or manifold underneath the rig, it must be safe, or they would not be doing it. What is that block/manifold thing called, I can't seem to find anything online, and is using just off the shelf rubber hose at amazon a good choice.

Just to double check my logic, punch holes in floor drop rubber hose run to block tap thing then connect that to my regulator and then my outdoor 100 gallon tank.

No hard line needed?
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Old 09-30-2018, 08:57 PM   #2
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I can't answer that, but I'm curious where you found a 100 gallon tank?

Biggest I can find for RV's is 29.3 gallon.
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Old 09-30-2018, 08:59 PM   #3
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Outdoor type tank they drop next to your rig.
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Old 09-30-2018, 09:09 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by cycle61 View Post
I can't answer that, but I'm curious where you found a 100 gallon tank?

Biggest I can find for RV's is 29.3 gallon.
He did say an outdoor tank. I also am putting the 29.3 tank on mine, specially made for an RV and easy mount and access to fill. I don't know where you would fit a 100g tank under there, overtime I look under mine I realize how little room is left after the fuel tank air tank and all the storage bins.
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Old 09-30-2018, 09:56 PM   #5
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Outdoor type tank they drop next to your rig.
Gotcha
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Old 09-30-2018, 11:00 PM   #6
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The relative merits of different types of propane pipes or lines is something that inspires heated comments on this and other forums. Tread carefully!

Just to add fuel to the fire (so to speak), I use Pro-Flex 1/2" CSST for almost all my propane lines. It's a flexible stainless-steel pipe and its dedicated fittings - it's very easy to install, and it should last indefinitely in a moving vehicle when installed appropriately. Each of my five appliance has its own valved line from the Pro-Flex distribution manifold. I use only one length of "rubber" gas hose, actually 1/4" Parker 7132 gas hose with MB Sturgis 5LPN quick-disconnect fittings, for unregulated propane directly from one of the 20 lb cylinders to an outlet for a grill. All CSST and rubber lines run inside 3/4" EMT conduit for extra protection.

John
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Old 10-01-2018, 08:17 AM   #7
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I just ran all mine finally and now have a interior stove and hot water, I have 2 29 gal tanks next to each other with and auto switch and used 1/2 black pipe straight down the middle of the bus and 90degree fittings up through the floor to a shutoff valve then rubber hoses made for each application. works great. I found an ace hardware that cuts and taps pipe so they made me the exact lengths I needed and the one down the center I drilled a hole in the bumper and slid the pipe in from the back so it could be secured to the ribbing of the deck with conduit straps.
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Old 11-10-2018, 07:00 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iceni John View Post
The relative merits of different types of propane pipes or lines is something that inspires heated comments on this and other forums. Tread carefully!

Just to add fuel to the fire (so to speak), I use Pro-Flex 1/2" CSST for almost all my propane lines. It's a flexible stainless-steel pipe and its dedicated fittings - it's very easy to install, and it should last indefinitely in a moving vehicle when installed appropriately. Each of my five appliance has its own valved line from the Pro-Flex distribution manifold. I use only one length of "rubber" gas hose, actually 1/4" Parker 7132 gas hose with MB Sturgis 5LPN quick-disconnect fittings, for unregulated propane directly from one of the 20 lb cylinders to an outlet for a grill. All CSST and rubber lines run inside 3/4" EMT conduit for extra protection.

John
John, I'm glad you brought this up. I am getting ready to run my propane as well and was hoping you could elaborate on a few things.

1) why use a manifold? Would it not be easier (interpreted: less line to run) to use a T connector off of your main run that T's off to each individual appliance?

2) I will have three appliances requiring propane: water heater, space heater, and oven/ range. Each appliance has come with it's own regulator and hose which is designed to connect directly to a 20 pound tank. Two regulators say they are set to a 1 psi Max and the other is set to a 5 psi max. I had initially envisioned running the CSST to termination plates and then a standard appliance gas hose from the plate to the appliance. But with the difference in the required pressures, it seems like I may be bound to use the regulator/ rubberized hose associated with each appliance. These however are not designed to mate with the Male threads of a termination plate, but with the tank itself.

Any recommendations on best practice for setting it up?

Do you have any pics or vids of your propane system you are willing to share? Thanks.
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Old 11-10-2018, 07:20 PM   #9
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I have a propane manifold for the same reason I have manifolds for cold and hot water - I want to be able to easily shut off individual lines without affecting the others, useful if doing work on just one line's appliance. Yes, it needs more CSST to do it this way, but I think it's the best way for my needs.

Sorry, no pics!

John
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Old 11-10-2018, 07:40 PM   #10
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My two cents

The one thing nobody mentions here is the need for a propane "sniffer". A relatively inexpensive thing that I learned about ands used when living aboard a boat. Also remember that propane is heavier than air, so if you have a leak it collect at the lowest point.
Lastly propane is nothing to play around with. Make sure whatever supply lines, valves, etc. you choose are rated for propane use.
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Old 11-11-2018, 10:04 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigskypc50 View Post
Need a quick lesson on propane.

I need to power 4 things on propane one 42K BTU RV Furnace, one blue flame 30K BTU wall heater and two water heaters at 38K BTU ea, not everything will be on at the same time.

I have seen many factory built RV's with rubber hose's all leading back to some kind of block or manifold underneath the rig, it must be safe, or they would not be doing it. What is that block/manifold thing called, I can't seem to find anything online, and is using just off the shelf rubber hose at amazon a good choice.

Just to double check my logic, punch holes in floor drop rubber hose run to block tap thing then connect that to my regulator and then my outdoor 100 gallon tank.

No hard line needed?
Do you need to have the ability for all of them running at the same time?

If so, pay attention to line sizing. 1/2" MAY be adequate. I would verify before you start building

https://www.tarantin.com/blog/propan...er-line-sizing
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Old 12-28-2018, 05:26 PM   #12
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This is a very interesting conversation as I'm also planning on installing some propane appliances. I will have a furnace I removed from a 5th wheel camper as well as a new 3 burner stove top. I will also use propane to heat my hot water but I haven't decided if it will be inside or out. When I purchased the furnace from the 2007 camper I also grabbed the regulator and appropriate fittings and some short lengths of black pipe that was on the camper. I was planning to just use black pipe under the bus on the frame like the camper did. It has copper pipe coming up to the furnace. Im not sure what I'll use for the stove top so I might use the rubber hose someone spoke of above.? I also like the idea of a shut off valve at each appliance. I'm leaning towards an on demand hot water heater like a eco temp and it will most likely be mounted outside on the back of the bus.

One of the first things I did was order a propane/carbon monoxide alarm for rv that is 12v powered like you find in campers. It was under $100 and I think is well worth money for peace of mind in the end.

Is there any down fall to using black pipe like on the campers?
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Old 12-28-2018, 06:14 PM   #13
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This is a very interesting conversation as I'm also planning on installing some propane appliances. I will have a furnace I removed from a 5th wheel camper as well as a new 3 burner stove top. I will also use propane to heat my hot water but I haven't decided if it will be inside or out. When I purchased the furnace from the 2007 camper I also grabbed the regulator and appropriate fittings and some short lengths of black pipe that was on the camper. I was planning to just use black pipe under the bus on the frame like the camper did. It has copper pipe coming up to the furnace. Im not sure what I'll use for the stove top so I might use the rubber hose someone spoke of above.? I also like the idea of a shut off valve at each appliance. I'm leaning towards an on demand hot water heater like a eco temp and it will most likely be mounted outside on the back of the bus.

One of the first things I did was order a propane/carbon monoxide alarm for rv that is 12v powered like you find in campers. It was under $100 and I think is well worth money for peace of mind in the end.

Is there any down fall to using black pipe like on the campers?
Mounting propane tanks on the back of the bus may not be legal in your state. Might want to reconsider the location.
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Old 12-30-2018, 11:05 PM   #14
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Mounting propane tanks on the back of the bus may not be legal in your state. Might want to reconsider the location.
I need to check into that. I assume it's legal as I see a lot of food trucks with 100 gallon tanks strapped to a rear bumper all of the time here in Kansas.

I was also thinking about a spot in the lower body with a door. I could build a heavy steel box with open floor so if there's any leaks it escapes easily. Part of this space would take up the valuable space on the inside.
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Old 02-24-2019, 05:22 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erniejt View Post
The one thing nobody mentions here is the need for a propane "sniffer". A relatively inexpensive thing that I learned about ands used when living aboard a boat. Also remember that propane is heavier than air, so if you have a leak it collect at the lowest point.
Lastly propane is nothing to play around with. Make sure whatever supply lines, valves, etc. you choose are rated for propane use.
So this is basically an alarm for propane leaks? Is that what this "sniffer"is?
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Old 02-24-2019, 05:27 PM   #16
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So this is basically an alarm for propane leaks? Is that what this "sniffer"is?
Yes. You can also find them combined with Carbon Monoxide sniffers too. They draw the absolute minimum of power, and most of time you forget it's there.
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Old 02-24-2019, 05:37 PM   #17
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Yes. You can also find them combined with Carbon Monoxide sniffers too. They draw the absolute minimum of power, and most of time you forget it's there.
Cool, thanks!!!
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