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Old 07-09-2023, 01:56 PM   #1
Skoolie
 
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Some help with Propane Fittings

I am hooking up appliances and I could use some help with figuring the fittings that I need. The bus is plumbed with 1/2 black pipe that runs within 6in of each appliance. The plan is for 3/8in flared copper to run from the black pipe to the appliance.


- Water heater (PrecisionTemp NSP-EC): it is fitted with a 3/8 M flared fitting, so this is pretty straight forward.


- Furances (ProPex HS2800): it is fitted with an 8mm (5/16”) compression fitting. As I understand it, compression gas fittings are not to code in the US. Is there an adapter to flare that I can fit?


Thanks!

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Old 07-09-2023, 02:33 PM   #2
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Get a flaring tool and tubing bender for 3/8 tubing. Make your final connections using soft copper tubing and flare nuts.

Have you pressure tested your iron pipe? If you haven’t, do it before making the connection. After you connect, check your flare connections with soap bubbles
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Old 07-09-2023, 02:40 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danjo View Post
Get a flaring tool and tubing bender for 3/8 tubing. Make your final connections using soft copper tubing and flare nuts.

Have you pressure tested your iron pipe? If you haven’t, do it before making the connection. After you connect, check your flare connections with soap bubbles
I have a tubing bender and flaring tool. I've done brake lines for car restorations, so I'm pretty comfortable with that.


I have also pressure tested the the iron pipe and it is good to go.
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Old 07-09-2023, 04:17 PM   #4
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there are 2 grades of soft copper i use the ac type
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Old 07-09-2023, 05:53 PM   #5
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type M copper is the thinnest. in my world only for residential stable use.
type L and ACR are the same thickness and sometimes you pay more for ACR because it is labled and specifically cleeaned and plug for refrigerant tubing purpose but other than the special treatment of blowing it out with nitrogen type L is the same.
type K is the thickest and most expensive. for underground copper type K is the only one allowed.
all soft copper in a flexible position is subject to work hardening and breaking over time just like anything soft that can be bent or worked so many times that it gives up and says if thats what you meant for me to do then fine hear you go.
i know the flexible braided gas lines you can get in the big box stores say not for RV use but look for the same gas line up on an RV website and you can match the two up almost perfectly except for an H in the model instead of an R.
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Old 07-09-2023, 06:33 PM   #6
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The various grades/thicknesses is interesting. I haven’t seen mention of that, but I think NFPA 1192 specifically calls for the flanged copper connections. Maybe it’s changed or my memory is incomplete. You can read it for yourself online at the NFPA website. You’ll need an account. They don’t spam and as far as I can tell they don’t sell your info.
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Old 07-09-2023, 09:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jolly Roger bus 223 View Post
type M copper is the thinnest. in my world only for residential stable use.
type L and ACR are the same thickness and sometimes you pay more for ACR because it is labled and specifically cleeaned and plug for refrigerant tubing purpose but other than the special treatment of blowing it out with nitrogen type L is the same.
type K is the thickest and most expensive. for underground copper type K is the only one allowed.
Great info! Fortunately, I was already planning on type-L and now I have extra assurance.
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Old 07-09-2023, 09:34 PM   #8
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The furnace is fitted with an 8mm (5/16”) compression fitting. Is there an adapter fitting that I can use to go to 3/8 flare?
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Old 07-15-2023, 10:58 PM   #9
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I worked my whole life as a steamfitter I read a lot of copper lines to boiler burners but I find every so many years we have to replace them. The vibration from the boiler causes them to crack. Any sulfides in the gas each pinholes and copper. The vibration on the bus is going to be way worse. You can get flexible lines with the fittings you need which are certified and made of Hose material. You can even get a 3/8 by 5/8 hose so you won't have to adapt. They also sell kits you can make up your own houses any length you want
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Old 07-15-2023, 11:10 PM   #10
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Forgot, need shut off valve at each appliance, before flex or copper line.
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Old 07-16-2023, 02:51 AM   #11
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Opinion:
I think heavier black pipe -- 3/4", 1" -- offers substantially greater thread strength.
I think stouter everything is my minimum for any vessel carrying potentially flammable-slash-explosive liquids or gases.
.
I think the potential for vibration-induced failure outweighs any savings on material.
And then, the potential for failure during a wreck.
.
.
2003, after a half-century of make-do camping in lesser rigs, we built our ExpeditionVehicle.
We use twenty-pound five-gallon propane bottles.
We direct-connect any appliance with a four-foot (4') hose, visually verify the integrity, use the appliance -- cooking, heating -- then, after we are done, immediately disconnect the hose from the bottle.
.
One of my hobbies is walking wrecking-yards aka 'dismantlers'.
Based on my experience, I think we are witnessing daily miracles... I am astounded more vehicles don't simply decompose -- new -- on their way home from the dealership.
Sharing the road with vehicles built by committee-decisions based on economics, I think we are lucky beyond any definition of the word.
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Old 10-10-2023, 12:20 AM   #12
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Still looking for a way to adapt from 8mm (5/16”) compression fitting to 3/8 flare. Any thoughts?
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Old 10-10-2023, 08:22 AM   #13
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Is this it?

https://www.amazon.com/HongBoW-Fitti.../dp/B09BTMN1FZ

What does the pipe look like coming out of the unit? Is it male or female? Threaded? I see mention of 1/4” BSP
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Old 10-10-2023, 10:17 AM   #14
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Lowes often has fittings compression and flare.use coupling in between two fittings. Also A/C supply housed houses have assortments of fittings. Last but not least(more expensive) Grangers has fittings
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Old 10-10-2023, 12:18 PM   #15
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Angry

Quote: One of my hobbies is walking wrecking-yards aka 'dismantlers'.
Based on my experience, I think we are witnessing daily miracles... I am astounded more vehicles don't simply decompose -- new -- on their way home from the dealership.
Sharing the road with vehicles built by committee-decisions based on economics, I think we are lucky beyond any definition of the word. End Quote

I am 65 years old-- been in the automotive business all my life, and your above assessment is spot on. Electronics out the wazoo, and if anything fails the entire system can be taken down. I have collected a bunch of old stuff--that I think can be kept running (most of it over 20 years old... and still going) because this new stuff is really expensive throw away junk.... it's not what people want-- it's what the government dictates that can be built, and they want you 200% tied to the manufacturer for any repairs. bah- humbug....

(Where's my blood pressure medicine.)

Sorry for the thread drift-- I couldn't help it....
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Old 10-10-2023, 01:01 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by incubus View Post
Lowes often has fittings compression and flare.use coupling in between two fittings. Also A/C supply housed houses have assortments of fittings. Last but not least(more expensive) Grangers has fittings
I think it’s a British thread size according to the documentation some variant of 1/4”

I’ve seen compression fittings used for propane in a sailboat before. Really bad idea and no longer code in USA
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Old 10-10-2023, 02:01 PM   #17
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You'll need several fittings here.

Going from 1/2 pipe to 3/8 flare to 5/16 compression will be more fittings, and I'm not aware of any 3/8 flare to 5/16 compressions adapter fittings. You'll likely have to go from 3/8 flare to 1/4 npt, then 1/4 npt to 1/8 npt, then 1/8 npt to 5/16 compression.

Better off to go from your 1/2 pipe to 5/16 compression, 5/16 cunnifer pipe, then 5/16 compression on the unit.

I say cunnifer because soft copper work hardens and any movement/vibration/etc will cause this to become brittle, break, and then you'll have a gas leak inside. Cunnifer doesn't work harden, neither does steel fwiw. You can get short segments of cunnifer from your autoparts stores, they'll be as brake lines, and then just cut the flares and fittings off for your compression fittings.
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Old 10-10-2023, 02:23 PM   #18
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My idea goes from black pipe to this https://www.menards.com/main/plumbin...781-c-9432.htm

to this https://www.menards.com/main/plumbin....htm?exp=false

to this https://www.menards.com/main/plumbin...Variation=true

to this https://www.napaonline.com/en/p/BK_8135633

To your unit.

That cunnifer pipe is 6 foot. You can get them in shorter segments if needed. the 6 footer just came up first in a search.

As others have said, I don't think it's wise to use compression fittings with propane, but if the fitting on the unit isn't removable, then you're stuck with using it.
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Old 10-11-2023, 02:14 AM   #19
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https://www.fittings.space/fittings-by-thread/metric-thread-adapters/un-sae-metric-adapter-fittings.html

They seem to have a pretty good selection
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Old 10-11-2023, 07:23 AM   #20
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Copper over a period of time ,due to vibration ,can crack. I use flex line from black steel to appliances. Most appliances have removable fittings on them. Wire brush where fitting mates to pipe see if there is threads under the paint and pipe dope.
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