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Old 06-25-2023, 05:57 AM   #21
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Year: 1980
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450-500 ft/lb with dry threads for both 3/4-16, and 1-1/8-16, .875" spherical radius nuts (Also known as "ball seat" nuts).

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Old 06-25-2023, 06:06 AM   #22
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Year: 1980
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rwnielsen View Post
Sorry I confused the issue...I bought a torque multiplier to loosen and was looking at that torque device for tightening lug nuts. I should have been more clear
Torque Wrench, 3/4 drive with a rating of 100 ft-lbs to 650 ft-lbs.

Something along the lines of this: Torque Wrench 3/4-Inch Drive(100-650 ft-lbs/135-880Nm)

I picked up a Impact Socket Adapter Set to use the sockets that came with my Torque Multiplier with the 3/4 Torque Wrench that have..
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Old 06-25-2023, 10:55 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IDoMy0wnRacing View Post
Torque Wrench, 3/4 drive with a rating of 100 ft-lbs to 650 ft-lbs.

Something along the lines of this: Torque Wrench 3/4-Inch Drive(100-650 ft-lbs/135-880Nm)

I picked up a Impact Socket Adapter Set to use the sockets that came with my Torque Multiplier with the 3/4 Torque Wrench that have..
I got a similar budget brand click-type torque wrench as well as adapters like you mentioned. Couldn't be happier. The electronic torque adapter looks pretty slick, but I figured that feeling/hearing a physical "click" is simpler for my monkey brain to process than listening for the "beep". Maybe I'll never need to do emergency tire work, but I feel good knowing that I could. And I've found several excuses already to remove wheels to make other work easier.

You'll need a drive extension if you want to torque your rear wheels. Something like this:
Sunex 4313 3/4-Inch Drive 13-Inch Extension https://a.co/d/fylLoUT.
You'll also need a helper or a variable-height stand that holds the extension level while you're torquing. I'm planning on welding a 24" tall "tree" with horizontal limbs every 2" that will hold the drive extension level (ish) with each lug nut. Will post pictures if I ever get around to making it.
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Old 07-06-2023, 07:55 AM   #24
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You have a front axle rated too high for standard grease. Those hubs use Mobilith SHC 007 lithum complex semi-fluid synthetic grease. Fill the center cavity, rear cavity and a little in the hub cap. It is a flowing grease. We've had good returns with this grease. Never have to worry about inner seal leaks, it can't flow out well enough to cause a burn up.

Grab a clean cool whip tub and go to a local shop, you likely won't find this kind of grease in a small container. Most shops would give you the amount you need as a kind gesture.
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Old 07-06-2023, 11:28 AM   #25
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That's the information I was looking for. Thank you. I didn't feel comfortable cleaning out the excess and sealing it up. A 5 gallon tub of it is over $500, I'll check around town like you said...with my cool whip tub
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Old 07-06-2023, 01:44 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Rwnielsen View Post
That's the information I was looking for. Thank you. I didn't feel comfortable cleaning out the excess and sealing it up. A 5 gallon tub of it is over $500, I'll check around town like you said...with my cool whip tub
Yup, crazy expensive. Our 15 gallon drum is 1/2 full after 10 years. Little goes a long way in a normal fleet.

Just another head up..... extra note, don't forget to pack (or sink) the bearings like normal grease.

When this system first came out in the 90's we had a rash of burn ups because mechanics were packing bearing only and leaving the hub belly's empty as you might with normal grease. It flowed/spun away into empty hub cavities and starved the bearings. You need to pack the bearings AND fill hub belly/cavities. Fill meaning a puddle from race to race, not pump-out-all-the-air full.

I was paranoid enough I'd put an inch or two of fluid grease in the hub cap and did one reeeeally fast manuever to slap the cap on before it could flow away. Only if I had a hub cap felt gasket... if just using silicone.... better not try this or you'll be leaking again if the grease flows and screws your silicone bead. It's about the consistency of cool, coagulated, gravy. Good Luck man!!!
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Old 07-06-2023, 04:54 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tin Roadtube Vagrant View Post
Yup, crazy expensive. Our 15 gallon drum is 1/2 full after 10 years. Little goes a long way in a normal fleet.

Just another head up..... extra note, don't forget to pack (or sink) the bearings like normal grease.

When this system first came out in the 90's we had a rash of burn ups because mechanics were packing bearing only and leaving the hub belly's empty as you might with normal grease. It flowed/spun away into empty hub cavities and starved the bearings. You need to pack the bearings AND fill hub belly/cavities. Fill meaning a puddle from race to race, not pump-out-all-the-air full.

I was paranoid enough I'd put an inch or two of fluid grease in the hub cap and did one reeeeally fast manuever to slap the cap on before it could flow away. Only if I had a hub cap felt gasket... if just using silicone.... better not try this or you'll be leaking again if the grease flows and screws your silicone bead. It's about the consistency of cool, coagulated, gravy. Good Luck man!!!

do you prefer this over oil bath? ive got oil bath on 2 of my busses and have had zero issues other than a couple wheel seal leaks I caught early as they are checked often.. (daily on a trip and at any stop I make I look for signs of leakage)..


my old 1978 Loadstar has standard grease hubs that have stayed full and clean.. I repacked them once a couple years ago as they looked a bit dirty then..



im guessing the standard grease hibs are a candidate for Semi-fluid but the oil bath need to stay oil bath?
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Old 07-07-2023, 12:02 AM   #28
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Quote:
When this system first came out in the 90's we had a rash of burn ups because mechanics were packing bearing only and leaving the hub belly's empty as you might with normal grease. It flowed/spun away into empty hub cavities and starved the bearings. You need to pack the bearings AND fill hub belly/cavities. Fill meaning a puddle from race to race, not pump-out-all-the-air full.

One final question...is the red colored SHC 007 the same as the dark blue (?) that was in my bearings? I mean, are they compatible?
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Old 07-07-2023, 11:35 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
do you prefer this over oil bath? ive got oil bath on 2 of my busses and have had zero issues other than a couple wheel seal leaks I caught early as they are checked often.. (daily on a trip and at any stop I make I look for signs of leakage)..


my old 1978 Loadstar has standard grease hubs that have stayed full and clean.. I repacked them once a couple years ago as they looked a bit dirty then..



im guessing the standard grease hibs are a candidate for Semi-fluid but the oil bath need to stay oil bath?
You can convert to semi fluid anytime. We did. I'd have to go to literature, but it was 500K or 700K miles for cleaning and repacking these synthetic... or earlier if you feel "play" developing during a PM inspection.

Google SKF 1343. Make sure you don't put a standard bath style hub cap on with a fill port or some chucklehead with dump gear oil in it, guaranteed. These 1343 style caps have a small weatherproof breather to allow air to move out and in cleanly. SKF should have seal caps available for most hub configurations.

Sounds paranoid, but if you would have to reuse the transparent fillable oil hub cap, buff and paint the glass white. One, so that no one can see through it.. to reduce curiosity. Second, U.V. light kills. A plastic lens in direct sun let's the UV though. After a number of years parked in sun you can watch the green-lube Groeneveld version turn into a thicker, oxydized-looking, brown caramel where sun hits it. Not so with a closed cap. Don't understand why, but saw it happen.
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Old 08-28-2023, 01:47 PM   #30
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I've been reading up on this subject for a little bit now and have a much better understanding. Although I'm not sure what brand is in my wheels now (color) I find that SHC 007 is red, the Champion 00 I bought is amber and there are variations of each.
The NLGI (National Lubricating Grease Institute) ratings are key here. This is a cold consistency rating and what I currently have is #00 (semi-fluid, lithium based) with a 460 weight. NLGI ratings are from #00 to #4, #4 being very stiff. They are rated for extreme pressure and suitable for truck hubs.
I didn't know any of this when I cleaned out all the extra grease in my hubs and then was told the extra is absolutely necessary to avoid grease starvation due to centrifugal forces. I'm going to pack (fill) these like they were before and with a new gasket, torque the bolts to spec and hope for no leaks
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Old 08-28-2023, 01:49 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rwnielsen View Post
I've been reading up on this subject for a little bit now and have a much better understanding. Although I'm not sure what brand is in my wheels now (color) I find that SHC 007 is red, the Champion 00 I bought is amber and there are variations of each.
The NLGI (National Lubricating Grease Institute) ratings are key here. This is a cold consistency rating and what I currently have is #00 (semi-fluid, lithium based) with a 460 weight. NLGI ratings are from #00 to #4, #4 being very stiff. They are rated for extreme pressure and suitable for truck hubs.
I didn't know any of this when I cleaned out all the extra grease in my hubs and then was told the extra is absolutely necessary to avoid grease starvation due to centrifugal forces. I'm going to pack (fill) these like they were before and with a new gasket, torque the bolts to spec and hope for no leaks
I know this isn't an exciting subject by I wanted to follow through with the info
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