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Old 02-03-2024, 09:19 PM   #1
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1990 Fuso

Hi we just installed the Grey water tank under our 1990 fuso bus would love to get any advice from members regarding the installation in photos below if you can see anything we have done wrong or could lead to problems in the future we made sure to use glav plated steel being under the bus and exposed to moisture from the road etc. So yer give us some feedback please and around what others have done for the vent and plumbing etc.
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Old 02-03-2024, 09:22 PM   #2
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If that plastic blue 50 gal drum is your grey water tank you are doing it all wrong I'm afraid. That seal on the end is going to burst wide open when you slam on brakes and enough pressure hits the wall of that, then you'll have grey water all over everywhere. You need a proper tank for that.

Hard to tell from the photo though is it a plastic or metal container? If it's metal you'll be fine, but plastic nope.

Also those bolts are going to be wholly insufficient for that much water weight.

You're also going to need a front and rear strap to prevent the drum from sliding right out of those two hoops
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Old 02-03-2024, 10:26 PM   #3
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OK I had put a bit of research into it and decided on using it base on the following.
It's a UN rated 255l drum for hazardous materials so it has the thicker wall of 10mm it has to pass testing for its tensile strengths both full and half full of fuilds in both the vertical and horizontal position this includes the 2 screw in caps. The Ultimate Tensile Strength
(ASTM D412-06a (2013)) is 5000
It's has to handle 35 % compression with out breaking both full and half full. The total P.S.I it must with stand is 1600P.S.I. so I was hoping that with doing all that research I had picked the right drum being nearly twice as thick as most Grey water tanks available to buy. I also put the two openings at the back so like you said when you breaked the force of the water is first directed it the strongest part of the drum first. Thanks for you feedback. I think some testing might be needed. Time to half fill it and take it for a drive
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Old 02-03-2024, 10:38 PM   #4
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They sell tanks with baffles in the middle. Baffles help keep the water from sloshing too hard from front to back. Think walls in the middle of the tanks to prevent the distance from front to back from being so long to prevent the liquid from sloshing too far. Distance = speed when breaking, so the longer the container without a resistance such as a baffle, the faster and harder it will hit that wall.

Your drum may work for awhile, but I fear that one day the seams of that plastic may split as it ages, and such a force as a brake slam may over power it someday as it ages.
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Old 02-03-2024, 11:14 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by 1990 Fuso School bus View Post
OK I had put a bit of research into it and decided on using it base on the following.
It's a UN rated 255l drum for hazardous materials so it has the thicker wall of 10mm it has to pass testing for its tensile strengths both full and half full of fuilds in both the vertical and horizontal position this includes the 2 screw in caps. The Ultimate Tensile Strength
(ASTM D412-06a (2013)) is 5000
It's has to handle 35 % compression with out breaking both full and half full. The total P.S.I it must with stand is 1600P.S.I. so I was hoping that with doing all that research I had picked the right drum being nearly twice as thick as most Grey water tanks available to buy. I also put the two openings at the back so like you said when you breaked the force of the water is first directed it the strongest part of the drum first. Thanks for you feedback. I think some testing might be needed. Time to half fill it and take it for a drive
Being a "Stronger" tank I think it will be ok but the mounting method used could use a little bit more thought with regards to lasting a long time.

The constant side to side swaying while in motion and the simple way you have it fastened I would wonder how long it will last. My initial thoughts were that there should be at least 3 straps and some sort of method from keeping that barrel from sliding in/out - forward backward over the course of time. Then there is the thought of "will the barrel roll" within the straps? Would any rolling affect the piping attached?

And why would it "Roll"?
With the constant vibrations of traveling down the road, if anyone of those screws holding the strap to the frame were to vibrate loose, the tank could roll!

Have you thought of building a cage and welding it in place with square tubing versus using straps?

Other than that I like the creativity of recycling the drum versus spending a couple of hundred bucks on a store bought tank.
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Old 02-04-2024, 02:40 PM   #6
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I'm assuming he's not a welder judging by the mounting methods and choice of tank material.
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Old 02-04-2024, 08:07 PM   #7
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I mounted all four of my bus's tanks under the floor by cradling their top sides in frames attached to the underside of the floor, as well as using the sides of the frame rails and some structural crossmembers for additional security. This way the tanks absolutely cannot move forward, back, left or right. Each tank is supported by ten hangers of 1/2" threaded rod that hold the tanks tight up against the floor. I have completely eliminated any possibility of movement in any of the six potential directions.

My two 110-gallon rotomolded water tanks each weigh about 100 lbs empty when their bottom supports and their plywood sides and floor are included. I allowed for dynamic loads up to three times greater than their static weights, and the ten hangers can easily handle them with almost half a ton of water in each tank.

Don't underestimate the forces acting on every part of a moving vehicle, and if in doubt over-engineer, just like the great Victorian engineers whose structures are still standing strong after almost two centuries. Also, don't forget about redundancy: what would happen if one of your straps were to completely fail? Would the remaining supports still keep everything in place? Imagine if a Jolly Green Giant were to pick up your bus and shake it violently: what would fall off, and what would stay in place?

Isambard Kingdom John
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Old 02-05-2024, 11:53 AM   #8
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No comment other than what does a '90 Fuso bus look like? Were they sold in the US or are you somewhere else in the world?
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Old 02-12-2024, 01:44 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by 1990 Fuso School bus View Post
Hi we just installed the...could lead to problems [RIGHT NOW]...etc.
.
Semi-retired welder-fabricator here.
I am accustomed to thinking in terms of vibrational fatigue.
Over-built and rigid and stout.
Triangulation, buttresses, sky-hooks.
.
And all this time, are you telling me I could have did it your way?
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