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Old 02-06-2020, 03:08 AM   #1
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Hello everyone

I'm new in the community, I recently move to Pennsylvania just to buy my bus and start converting it... I had waited long for this change in my life so, which me luck
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Old 02-06-2020, 04:10 AM   #2
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The search can certainly cause one to scream in vain at times, but you've jumped that hurdle.

Best of luck with your build.....break it down into small tasks and you'll do fine.

Pleased to meet you.
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Old 02-06-2020, 04:14 AM   #3
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Welcome to the he Nut House !!!
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Old 02-06-2020, 10:21 AM   #4
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Welcome!

You may want to consider looking for your bus outside of the "rust belt". Rust issues can cost you significant time and effort to correct properly. The Western states turn out some nice buses.

Good luck.
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Old 02-06-2020, 10:42 AM   #5
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I would echo what PNW Steve has said.


It may cost $2K-$3K to move a bus from the west to PA but it could save you that much or more in time, $$$, and effort mitigating salt damage that is found on just about every bus that has seen service in the winter in the rust belt.


Good luck and keep us posted as to your progress.
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Old 02-06-2020, 11:13 AM   #6
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I saw a bunch of California buses on Govdeals or Public Surplus equipped with T444e and MD-3060. Probably not going to be the fastest bus on the road but not a bad combination.

My preference would be a DT-466/530 or the Cummins 8.3 but I have driven buses with the T444e and both the MD-3060 and the AT-545. The MD-3060 equipped buses were a world apart in how they drove.

I would likely pick a T444e/3060 equipped bus over one with a DT-466/545.

Just my $0.02
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Old 02-06-2020, 05:27 PM   #7
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Thanks alot, I'm so excited...
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Old 02-06-2020, 05:29 PM   #8
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Your advice is really appreciated tho I'm not to sure of the difference in each one of them, I mean how do I know the difference when I look at the bus?
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Old 02-06-2020, 05:31 PM   #9
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Do you know any place that I can probably find a bus, that is good for long drive I want to live full time on it and drive it everywhere... any advice?
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Old 02-06-2020, 05:32 PM   #10
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Please to meet you guys all!!!
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Old 02-06-2020, 06:40 PM   #11
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Location: Ashtabula, Ohio
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Best of luck to you. Welcome to the site.
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Old 02-07-2020, 12:07 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anastasia View Post
Your advice is really appreciated tho I'm not to sure of the difference in each one of them, I mean how do I know the difference when I look at the bus?

There are four different types of buses: 'A', 'B', 'C', and 'D'. In each type there are multiple sizes and applications. There are so many different variations because there is no one single best bus. Regardless of which bus you finally decide will work the best for you it will come with some built in compromises around which you will have to work.


Before anyone can make any recommendations as to what differences you need to be aware of when shopping for a bus you need to determine what will work the best for you.
  • What use will the major use be for your bus--lots of miles have different requirements than one that will rarely be moving.
  • Where will the major use of your bus occur--off pavement and off grid will have different requirements than always within eyesight of a paved road and full hookups.
  • Who will be using your bus--size matters and become more of an issue the more people are involved with using your bus.
The only iron fast rules that apply regardless of what size of bus you use are:
  • No rust--a cheap bus that is eaten up with rust can end up costing you 2x-4x more than another bus that is nearly identical but has no rust and has an asking price twice what the rust bucket has for an asking price
  • Good power package--the engine and transmission are the two most expensive parts of the bus and the most expensive to repair and maintain. Spending more for a bus with a good power package can save you many thousands of $$$$$$$$$$$$$.
  • Adequate power and gearing--upgrading the gearing to get highway speeds and then upgrading the power package so you can go highway speeds is always more expensive than purchasing a bus with the power and speed you need. If you intend to not do much traveling having a worn out engine and top speeds of 47 MPH is not a big deal. If you intend to regularly travel down the highway, driving mosquito fogger with a top speed of 47 MPH can become a royal pain.
  • High headroom--if you are average height, a high headroom option probably means you won't need to or want to do a roof raise. If you are over 6' tall and intend to raise the roof, spending more to purchase a bus with high headroom when you intend to raise the roof anyway is a waste of $$$$.
Good luck and keep us posted as to your progress.
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Old 02-07-2020, 12:12 PM   #13
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Thank you Cowlitz.

Your post should be a sticky
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Old 02-07-2020, 12:54 PM   #14
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Tune up your learning curve, it's all your personal challenge to experience a new and exciting way to spend time and money. The outcome is wonderful, the education is priceless!
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Old 02-12-2020, 04:43 PM   #15
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Location: Mcminnville, TN
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Year: 90
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Chassis: GMC
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first things first

Check on insuring whatever you are considering buying. Getting a Skoolie insured is often difficult. It is one of the most discussed things on here.
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Old 02-13-2020, 11:44 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anastasia View Post
Your advice is really appreciated tho I'm not to sure of the difference in each one of them, I mean how do I know the difference when I look at the bus?
To find out the engine/transmission you can try looking on the stickers at the front of the bus with the VIN etc... often itíll have some info on there. Otherwise you probably have to look right on the engine/trans itself to know for sure. Also you will want to be sure to get highway friendly rear differential gear ratio. 6.xx is too high and 4.xx is usually pretty good but you also have to consider the transmission. If you test drive it you can look on the engine rpmís when going 60-70 mph to get an idea, usually the lower the rpm the better. If itís a bluebird you can go to Bluebird Vantage (google it) enter the VIN and youíll get some info on there.

When you find some youíre interested in be sure to check or ask on here so you donít end up with a big mistake. My favorite combo is the Cummins ISC 8.3 liter with the md3060 Allison transmission but thereís other good ones out there too. Also depending on what size bus you want. Rear engine buses are good because the engine noise is at the back however theyíre usually more expensive to buy. Front engine with the flat front can be noisier as youíre sitting right beside the engine and more price/hard to repair. Dog nose buses you get a few feet less interior floor space since engine compartment is sticking out in front of you. I also find them harder to drive.
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