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Old 03-22-2021, 05:28 PM   #1
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Help figuring Transport from NE to WA

Thank you all for your tremendous experience and knowledge shared on this forum; holy crap I was able to read through so much advice and feel confident in making the choice in buying the bus wooooo!

Now the bus is in Stuart, Nebraska... with a 2 hour radius to the nearest city with rental cars, airports and such. I'm trying to figure out a way to get there and drive it home.

Any Nebraska Skoolie's here?? Ideally I'd fly into Omaha and wish for a ride to Stuart. If anyone is available I can cover fuel and compensate your time! Or do you have any friends in Nebraska that would be interested?

We've looked into transport and that's... expensive so no. Posted it on Uship and received a quote for $1,100 for someone else to drive it to us.. but that doesn't allow us to visit with the previous owners, which we'd like to do in person.

Read on the forum of driving in our vehicle to the bus with a trailer, hooking up the trailer, loading the vehicle and driving it all back home.. this entails electrical work, towing set up, etc..

lyft is quoting $360 for a ride, thought about renting a uhaul for $160-260 which would get us to the nearest town 30 mins. away. And no bus routes go through either..

Does anyone have other ideas? I am all ears

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Old 03-22-2021, 05:56 PM   #2
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stuart to topeka

This is a 6 hour trip for me, one way. I figure Omaha to stuart is going to be about 3 hours. Looks like you are pretty much equidistant from any major air ports.

If you get lucky, there might be a skoolie on the road and can give a lift and a follow home...

Anyone up for a road trip?

$1100 is a bargain for hauling.

sorry I am so far away.

william
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Old 03-22-2021, 06:54 PM   #3
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Is that $1100 plus expenses? You have airfare to get to the area, Lyft to get to the bus. Hotel for at least one night. Cheapest, easiest way is to just drive it your self.
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Old 03-22-2021, 08:18 PM   #4
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Is that $1100 plus expenses? You have airfare to get to the area, Lyft to get to the bus.
And for God's sake, tip the driver. I've done rideshare and it is a huge rip-off. Uber and Lyft say tipping is not necessary, but drivers get about 50% on average for short trips, longer trips are worse because the rates are structured with time and mileage concurrent so that the rate gets cheaper at highway speeds. Example, I was given $117 of a $185 fare that took 2.5 hours to drive 120 miles, with no backhaul or return mileage. A $10 ride, I usually got $5.

Also having been an independent taxi owner operator that was squeezed out by this scam (and it is a scam), I would encourage calling ahead to make a reservation with an independent taxi driver if possible. Rideshare drivers are not allowed to take rides outside of the app, as they are otherwise not insured for it. Many independent drivers who own their own vehicle will give you a flat rate at less than a typical meter on a longer trip like that. And at least a taxi driver is getting more of the fare.

I actually have a lawsuit pending against Lyft. They booted me from the platform because I have to screen riders to make sure they do not smoke or vape, which can trigger serious asthma attacks for me. They even went so far as to say I cannot refuse a ride even for allergies. Both of which are BS, and are a clear violation of ADA, which clearly states that employees with disabilities (asthma is considered one) must be allowed a reasonable accommodation to do their job. Screening riders to prevent an asthma attack could be considered such an accommodation.

The Catch-22 is that we are 'independent contractors' when it suits them (meaning they duck and dodge benefits entanglements), but they treat us as employees when it suits them, in this case, telling me I cannot refuse a rider even if it is a health hazard for me and a safety hazard for them. So, if I'm not an employee, but an independent contractor, then where do they get off telling me I can't refuse a ride? I might add that Uber has never given me any trouble about this, though they are no better when it comes to pay.

OP, sorry for the ramble, just figured there are things people should know about this. If you can PM or email me the particulars, I can look into what I could do for you as far as pickup and delivery.
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Old 03-22-2021, 09:05 PM   #5
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Are the sellers willing to drive the bus to the airport and pick you up? You could pay them for their time, and then you could drive them back home. Give you a chance to talk with them and get to know the bus.
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Old 03-22-2021, 10:39 PM   #6
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Are the sellers willing to drive the bus to the airport and pick you up? You could pay them for their time, and then you could drive them back home. Give you a chance to talk with them and get to know the bus.
This! I picked up a bus in California and the seller drove the bus to the Greyhound station to pick me up. It was a highlight of that pick-up, actually.
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Old 03-22-2021, 11:58 PM   #7
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And for God's sake, tip the driver. I've done rideshare and it is a huge rip-off. Uber and Lyft say tipping is not necessary, but drivers get about 50% on average for short trips, longer trips are worse because the rates are structured with time and mileage concurrent so that the rate gets cheaper at highway speeds. Example, I was given $117 of a $185 fare that took 2.5 hours to drive 120 miles, with no backhaul or return mileage. A $10 ride, I usually got $5.

Also having been an independent taxi owner operator that was squeezed out by this scam (and it is a scam), I would encourage calling ahead to make a reservation with an independent taxi driver if possible. Rideshare drivers are not allowed to take rides outside of the app, as they are otherwise not insured for it. Many independent drivers who own their own vehicle will give you a flat rate at less than a typical meter on a longer trip like that. And at least a taxi driver is getting more of the fare.

I actually have a lawsuit pending against Lyft. They booted me from the platform because I have to screen riders to make sure they do not smoke or vape, which can trigger serious asthma attacks for me. They even went so far as to say I cannot refuse a ride even for allergies. Both of which are BS, and are a clear violation of ADA, which clearly states that employees with disabilities (asthma is considered one) must be allowed a reasonable accommodation to do their job. Screening riders to prevent an asthma attack could be considered such an accommodation.

The Catch-22 is that we are 'independent contractors' when it suits them (meaning they duck and dodge benefits entanglements), but they treat us as employees when it suits them, in this case, telling me I cannot refuse a rider even if it is a health hazard for me and a safety hazard for them. So, if I'm not an employee, but an independent contractor, then where do they get off telling me I can't refuse a ride? I might add that Uber has never given me any trouble about this, though they are no better when it comes to pay.

OP, sorry for the ramble, just figured there are things people should know about this. If you can PM or email me the particulars, I can look into what I could do for you as far as pickup and delivery.
In the UK the just decided Uber drivers are now considered "workers", not employees and get a minimum wage and benefits for Uber Eats and those services.
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Old 03-23-2021, 08:38 AM   #8
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And for God's sake, tip the driver. I've done rideshare and it is a huge rip-off. Uber and Lyft say tipping is not necessary, but drivers get about 50% on average for short trips, longer trips are worse because the rates are structured with time and mileage concurrent so that the rate gets cheaper at highway speeds. Example, I was given $117 of a $185 fare that took 2.5 hours to drive 120 miles, with no backhaul or return mileage. A $10 ride, I usually got $5.

Also having been an independent taxi owner operator that was squeezed out by this scam (and it is a scam), I would encourage calling ahead to make a reservation with an independent taxi driver if possible. Rideshare drivers are not allowed to take rides outside of the app, as they are otherwise not insured for it. Many independent drivers who own their own vehicle will give you a flat rate at less than a typical meter on a longer trip like that. And at least a taxi driver is getting more of the fare.

I actually have a lawsuit pending against Lyft. They booted me from the platform because I have to screen riders to make sure they do not smoke or vape, which can trigger serious asthma attacks for me. They even went so far as to say I cannot refuse a ride even for allergies. Both of which are BS, and are a clear violation of ADA, which clearly states that employees with disabilities (asthma is considered one) must be allowed a reasonable accommodation to do their job. Screening riders to prevent an asthma attack could be considered such an accommodation.

The Catch-22 is that we are 'independent contractors' when it suits them (meaning they duck and dodge benefits entanglements), but they treat us as employees when it suits them, in this case, telling me I cannot refuse a rider even if it is a health hazard for me and a safety hazard for them. So, if I'm not an employee, but an independent contractor, then where do they get off telling me I can't refuse a ride? I might add that Uber has never given me any trouble about this, though they are no better when it comes to pay.

OP, sorry for the ramble, just figured there are things people should know about this. If you can PM or email me the particulars, I can look into what I could do for you as far as pickup and delivery.
I took an Uber the other day, and on my receipt it laid out the amount that goes to the driver. I don't know if there are other expenses that come out of that amount, or if it is true. These were just short trips, to and from the airport in Seattle. Drivers were friendly and did good service, tipped well. I was surprised how expensive the Ubers were out there.
Last year I had a flight get cancelled and had to Uber home from a nearby state. That was about 1.5 hours, 95 miles. I tipped a standard amount via the app (reimbursable since a work trip) and slid the driver extra cash in that case. Not sure they were going to find a return fare. I much prefer Uber to a traditional yellow taxi.
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Old 03-23-2021, 12:06 PM   #9
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Replies & Update of Ideas

magnakansas ~ this quote was through Uship for a drive away service, but we really want to have the in person time with the previous owners before driving it home

o1marc ~ definitely agree, driving it ourselves is preferred

CHEESE_WAGON ~ I'd like to connect more to hear ideas; an uber was quoting $460+ and lyft was $360+, zZtrip taxi was $540+ this is all before tip; What would an independent taxi quote look like? from Omaha to Stuart NE?

so we were thinking of renting a uhaul, which the nearest city for drop off is 30 minutes away and get a ride from there to the bus. the uhaul quote is at $260.

Simplicity ~ hi neighbor (i grew up in Milton, WA and now live in Ellensburg) great idea for the previous owners to drive it to pick me up then I drop them off at home on the way back to WA. They aren't available to drive it to the airport, round trip that would be ~7.5 hours. They may be able to drive it to O'neil (where I'd drop off the uhaul) ~1 hour roundtrip.

I'm going to call them today and pitch this idea, hopefully they have a window in their schedule because this would be the best option.

Thank you all for the advice, ideas and insight into these options; especially the experiences of being on the driver side of taxi, uber, lyft etc. to be mindful of the exchange and what tipping provides.

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Old 03-23-2021, 12:20 PM   #10
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is this a real small town where you cannot do a 1 way rental car drop? or rent a U-haul van 1 way and drop?



greyhound to the nearest town with greyhound and then taxi or uber to the bus from there?



ive done some pretty wild stuff to go pick up vehicles in the past..
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Old 03-23-2021, 06:45 PM   #11
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CHEESE_WAGON ~ I'd like to connect more to hear ideas; an uber was quoting $460+ and lyft was $360+, zZtrip taxi was $540+ this is all before tip; What would an independent taxi quote look like? from Omaha to Stuart NE?
Thank you all for the advice, ideas and insight into these options; especially the experiences of being on the driver side of taxi, uber, lyft etc. to be mindful of the exchange and what tipping provides.

You really would have to get in touch with a taxi company or driver local to the area, I can't really give reliable specifics to that end, as I am in Virginia and do not know what kind of meter rate / flat rate is common in Omaha. Just be aware that they do have to cover their cost of return. I can tell you that most taxi meter rates will be structured with shorter trips in mind, thus most drivers will give flat rates for longer trips such as this. Either way, most end up with about $3-$5 a hour after expenses, so bear this in mind.

Here's another idea. Do you plan to tow your own vehicle along at some point? If so, you could go ahead and have a hitch installed locally, then drive your own vehicle to pickup, then rent a dolly or trailer to bring it back with you. The buyers of a similar bus I transported last summer went for this option, as they planned to tow anyway, thus I was able to drive my own vehicle to the pickup with no fuss or muss beyond a dolly rental and some minor hiccups with the dolly's wiring.

It also eliminated the cost of rental cars, taxis, etc. I more or less did this for $100 / day to pickup, including fuel. The upshot was there was no rental car to drop off, no taxi, etc. to go-between, and when it turned out the bus was going to need extensive repair (camshaft issue I mentioned), it gave us options, as it was cheaper for me to go home and wait there in the interim as opposed to hotel rooms. Just a thought. If you plan to tow anyway, having a hitch installed upfront might be a bit more expense that can simplify a whole lot of hassle. ;)
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Old 03-23-2021, 07:28 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by CHEESE_WAGON View Post
You really would have to get in touch with a taxi company or driver local to the area, I can't really give reliable specifics to that end, as I am in Virginia and do not know what kind of meter rate / flat rate is common in Omaha. Just be aware that they do have to cover their cost of return. I can tell you that most taxi meter rates will be structured with shorter trips in mind, thus most drivers will give flat rates for longer trips such as this. Either way, most end up with about $5 a hour after expenses, so bear this in mind.

Here's another idea. Do you plan to tow your own vehicle along at some point? If so, you could go ahead and have a hitch installed locally, then drive your own vehicle to pickup, then rent a dolly or trailer to bring it back with you. The buyers of a similar bus I transported last summer went for this option, as they planned to tow anyway, thus I was able to drive my own vehicle to the pickup with no fuss or muss beyond a dolly rental and some minor hiccups with the dolly's wiring.

It also eliminated the cost of rental cars, taxis, etc. I more or less did this for $100 / day to pickup, including fuel. The upshot was there was no rental car to drop off, no taxi, etc. to go-between, and when it turned out the bus was going to need extensive repair (camshaft issue I mentioned), it gave us options, as it was cheaper for me to go home and wait there in the interim as opposed to hotel rooms. Just a thought. If you plan to tow anyway, having a hitch installed upfront might be a bit more expense that can simplify a whole lot of hassle. ;)

towiung a vehicle gives you options.. if the bus is a total turd you turn around and go home.. if it breaks on you then you have a way to go get parts to fix it and to transport tools with you on the trip.
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Old 03-23-2021, 07:33 PM   #13
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I took an Uber the other day, and on my receipt it laid out the amount that goes to the driver. I don't know if there are other expenses that come out of that amount, or if it is true. These were just short trips, to and from the airport in Seattle. Drivers were friendly and did good service, tipped well. I was surprised how expensive the Ubers were out there.
Last year I had a flight get cancelled and had to Uber home from a nearby state. That was about 1.5 hours, 95 miles. I tipped a standard amount via the app (reimbursable since a work trip) and slid the driver extra cash in that case. Not sure they were going to find a return fare. I much prefer Uber to a traditional yellow taxi.
I got ripped off by Uber in Portland. It was my first time using Uber. When we pulled out of the airport he didn't turn the meter on, we were only going 2 miles to the hotel. Didn't think much about till we arrived and said "that'll be $30", wouldn't open the trunk with my bags till he got paid. Driver ripping off Uber.
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Old 03-23-2021, 11:58 PM   #14
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I got ripped off by Uber in Portland. It was my first time using Uber. When we pulled out of the airport he didn't turn the meter on, we were only going 2 miles to the hotel. Didn't think much about till we arrived and said "that'll be $30", wouldn't open the trunk with my bags till he got paid. Driver ripping off Uber.
Technically, there is no 'meter' with ridehsare. The driver starts the trip, cancels the trip (if you're being an @$$), or ends the trip. The app charges a rate set for the market in question by increments of mileage and time concurrently. Meaning you get charged time even when you are moving.

As for $30.00 for 2 miles, yes, it does sound ridiculous, but you have to consider that most localities allow a minimum for trips beginning or ending at the airport. Not excusing what this driver did, because with the exceptions of cash tips, they are absolutely not supposed to take any form of payment directly, all fares are supposed to be paid through the app.

However, put yourself in their shoes. I'm not defending their actions, myself, but I am telling the truth about this. If you were getting paid 50% of a ride that you knew the rider was paying $30 for, and let's say it was going a bit further than 2 miles (I've found that most folks aren't that good with distances unless they have something to record it), what would you do? In my area, for example. The local airport is 10 miles from town and the average trip takes about 20-25 minutes even with light to no traffic.

I should explain that the local airport is more like Wyle E. Coyote strapping himself to a rocket, with four puddle-jumpers doing 3-4 turnarounds per day, about 3-4 hours apart. Because it is so far from town, there is little to no chance of being lined up for a backhaul.

Rideshare companies charge riders about $22-$28 on average for this trip, and the driver gets about 50%, or $11-$14 of that, and yes, that $14 is before expenses. I pocket MAYBE $5-7 of that, which I'll explain in a moment. I might add that the app bumps drivers offline without telling them if they do not reach a high-demand area quickly enough (unrealistic in many situations), or as I've noticed, when your average earnings exceed $10/hr logged into the app, or $20/hr spent with riders. That alone sounds sketchy, but it is the truth. Also, drivers are only allowed 12 hrs of drive time, with a minimum of 12 hours off, which would seem reasonable. However, factor in the following (knowledge from running my own taxi business here for about 12 years).

First, local average speed around town is 13 mph.

Second, average deadhead miles are at a ratio of 3:1 - 4:1. Meaning a $0.50/mile operation cost is actually $1.50 - $2.00 per mile.

Third, average expenses are $3-$6 per hour.

Fourth, local market rideshare rate is $1.11/mi, $0.18/min, with a $2.40 booking fee and a $2.00 service fee neither of which are paid to the driver. The driver's cut of all this is $0.83/mi, $0.135/min (yes, 13.5 cents per minute, don't ask me how that works). Rates will vary by market, this is the one for my area.

Fifth, the most common rides local to my market have historically been between downtown and the bar district, approximately 1.5 mi on average, and takes about 8 minutes. Which for the rider, would be a $2.40 booking fee, $2.00 service fee, $1.66 for 1.5 mi, $1.44 for 8 mins of time, or $7.50, of which the driver would get $1.25 in mileage, and $1.08. However, lest we forget that rideshare companies are so gracious, we are given a minimum fare of $3.79, which used to be $3.06. While the company pockets $3.71.

So let's correct for all that, shall we?

Now, if you divide the average in-town speed of 13 mph by 1.5 mi per trip, that would be 8 to 8.5 trips per hour on a busy night, grossing $30.32 max. But that would be assuming back-to-back trips with no deadhead, and the rideshare apps do not give you what's close, it gives you what's available, often 1-3 miles away.

Remember that 3:1 - 4:1 mileage ratio I referred to? Here's where that comes into play. So, divide that 13 mph average by 5 (4 deadhead miles to 1 paid mile), which comes to 2.6, which means you average at best, 2-3 trips per hour in town. At $3.79 per trip, that seems like $7.58 - $11.37 per hour. But wait a minute! The app will bump you off if you average over $10/hr logged in, in my experience.

Also, my average cost per mile was $0.29 when I furloughed for COVID-19, but consider that this will rise over time as repairs become necessary, as my car is still fairly new and has needed little more than maintenance. Further consider that 13 mph at $0.30 / mi comes to $3.90 per hour in expenses. Most will average $0.30-$0.45/mi, depending on insurance and fuel prices / economy. So the average 1.5 mile trip with deadhead is around 4.5 miles, or roughly $1.31 in expense, against a $3.79 minimum. $2.48 profit, x 2/hr = $4.96, or x 3/hr = $7.44, hourly profit. But on average I have observed average earnings of around $6-7 per hour, with around $3-4 per hour left after expenses. So on an average day, a rideshare drive will take home at most $50 without tips.

And this is why I grossed $11,500 for driving 32,000 miles in 2018 until Miss Daisy slipped her moorings and knocked me galley-west. After that, I wasn't doing much better, given the car payment, full coverage insurance, and all the wonderful high-cost maintenance that comes with a newer car. I worked roughly 1,150 hrs that year, factoring 28 mph average speed overall (with commuting), which would average $10.06/hr, minus an average in-town cost of $4-$6 per hour, or $4-$6 per hour profit. So don't let rideshare companies bullsh*t you into thinking their drivers make $20/hr profit -- they don't, and never will.

On the 10-mile local airport run, I get $14 max of a $28 max fare. It's usually a turnaround with no backhaul unless I want to wait 2-4 hours for the next flight to come in, and it's easier to eat the deadhead to get back to town where riders are more likely to be. Accounting for that, I now have 40-50 minutes tied up in a $14 fare, with 20 miles of expense.

Which at $0.29/mi comes to $5.80. Subtract $5.80 from $14.00 and you get a max of $8.20 profit for 40-50 minutes driving, perhaps more with traffic. Divide $8.20 by 60 minutes and wow, look at that, $0.136 per minute. Which means that rideshare drivers are kept running their cars into the ground to profit $8 an hour at best.

Now, if you got $14 for what usually amounts to a 20-mile round trip that takes 45-60 minutes to get back where more rides are, with no return mileage paid and virtually no chance of a backhaul, and the riders rarely tipped, if ever, what would YOU do?

Marc - you might have been getting ripped off at $30 for 2 miles, but the rideshare company was hardly getting ripped off. I call it karma. It really is the company's fault, but only partially. Their fault lies in that the rates are too low, they skim entirely too much, and to top it all off, they not only lead riders to believe that drivers get more of the fare than they do (ask most folks and they will say the driver gets 80%, which is utter bullsh*t), but they also lead riders to believe that tipping is not necessary. Dirtiest rider trick in the book is to tell the driver they'll tip in the app when they have no intention of doing so. Some riders will actually give false complaints or bad ratings for no reason just to try to get a free ride.

But remember I said it is only partially the company's fault? That's right, the rest of the fault lies with the rider. I say this because before everyone got so enamored with rideshare, they had more choices. Now that riders have helped rideshare companies run most, if not all of the taxi companies out of business, you now have limited options. And along the way, a lot of your more professional taxi drivers have either thrown in the towel or been forced to work for rideshare, earning peanuts. So riders have really brought this about of their own accord. They didn't bother with other options when they were available, all to save a buck.

The problem really comes down to this. In today's society, so many say minimum wage needs to go up, yet no one values anyone else's time when they're the one paying for it. Can't have it both ways, folks. And forgive the bluntness, but if you're too cheap to tip a few bucks when the driver is getting ripped off this way, you are part of the problem. And tip directly if possible, don't do it in the app -- neither you nor the driver have any way of know if rideshare companies are skimming that, too.

And before anyone tells me or any other rideshare / taxi driver to find a better job, remember that you are the one who needs their services. Where would you be if they all went and got a better job? You also don't know them or their circumstance. And the reason most are doing this in the first place -- there are no better jobs in the area that we can do.

I, for example, have severe asthma that pretty much keeps me from doing anything else. If I had my choice, I'd still be rolling 40 tons across the lower 48. Money's better, if only slightly (I averaged about $12/hr). But diesel exhaust is the last thing an asthmatic needs to be around.

Sorry for the further derail, OP, but I just felt people need to know this, since the subject came up.
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Old 03-24-2021, 03:39 AM   #15
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The problem really comes down to this. In today's society, so many say minimum wage needs to go up, yet no one values anyone else's time when they're the one paying for it. Can't have it both ways, folks. And forgive the bluntness, but if you're too cheap to tip a few bucks when the driver is getting ripped off this way, you are part of the problem. And tip directly if possible, don't do it in the app -- neither you nor the driver have any way of know if rideshare companies are skimming that, too.
Californians: Employees deserve minimum wage
Lawsuit: are rideshare and food delivery drivers employees or independent contractors
CA Labor Board: rideshare and food delivery drivers are employees so deserve minimum wage
Voter referendum: rideshare and food delivery drivers are exempt from minimum wage

This is exactly what society in California said by their actions in the last few years. They scream for $15 an hour but when they finally comprehend that higher wages for service industry workers directly means higher cost of goods and services, all their compassion dissolves into brutal honesty that they don't actually value what the service industry is worth. 2020 especially highlighted the disparities of the system when the only ones who profited from the surge in demand for their services were the stockholders not the actual laborers who put themselves at risk for little pay.

What I honestly don't understand though is why so many people stick with these ride share or food delivery services. Is it just the lack of other employment options? Trucking companies pay huge sign on bonuses for quality drivers, why shouldn't ride sharing services be having to aggressively recruit drivers also. Everyone has to know by now there's no living wage to be found in the industry's current business model and economic climate so why are they willing to sign on or stay on?

Sorry for contributing to the thread drift.
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Old 03-24-2021, 08:08 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sehnsucht View Post
Californians: Employees deserve minimum wage
Lawsuit: are rideshare and food delivery drivers employees or independent contractors
CA Labor Board: rideshare and food delivery drivers are employees so deserve minimum wage
Voter referendum: rideshare and food delivery drivers are exempt from minimum wage

This is exactly what society in California said by their actions in the last few years. They scream for $15 an hour but when they finally comprehend that higher wages for service industry workers directly means higher cost of goods and services, all their compassion dissolves into brutal honesty that they don't actually value what the service industry is worth. 2020 especially highlighted the disparities of the system when the only ones who profited from the surge in demand for their services were the stockholders not the actual laborers who put themselves at risk for little pay.

What I honestly don't understand though is why so many people stick with these ride share or food delivery services. Is it just the lack of other employment options? Trucking companies pay huge sign on bonuses for quality drivers, why shouldn't ride sharing services be having to aggressively recruit drivers also. Everyone has to know by now there's no living wage to be found in the industry's current business model and economic climate so why are they willing to sign on or stay on?

Sorry for contributing to the thread drift.

judging from the number of smashed up amazon vans and crappy denty cars i see delivering food id say that a lot of the delivery workers have less than stellar driving records.. which means getting hired in a CDL position would be tough for many.. I also dont believe that uber / lyft check for imigration status.. as long as you have a car less than 10 years old and in good shape you can drive people around.. (I may be wrong on that one.. im only going on what ive read about the early days of those services)..


many of the ubder / lyft rides i take are actually retired folk who are bored staying at home or their wife is a real B! and they like getting away for the day..


one ride i took was clearly about letting every rider know about Jesus.. the last thing I wanted to hear about when being driven to a gay pride parade.. im not sure he ever lknew i had slipped on my Bose QC15's...





as for the OP.. another thought came to mind.. put up an ad in the local FB marketplace or craigslist that you are looking for a CDL driver to drive a buis from town B to omaha..



you fly into omaha, rent a car, pick up said driver, drive to town A.. CDL driver drives the bus back to omaha.. you turn in rental car, get in bus and go home..



reason I say CDL driver is thats the best likiliehood of not just getting any old thug and would find someone capable of driving a bus..



im guessing you could pay less than what a one way rental or uber would cost to do it and find someone interested in a day trip.



-Christopher
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Old 03-24-2021, 07:28 PM   #17
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Definitely need to consider the additional cost of transporting a bus before buying it.

The drive there and then use bus to tow it back is the best option.
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Old 03-24-2021, 07:47 PM   #18
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Is this the place the OP is buying the bus from? Myers Bus Service

I punched in the closes city, to Stuart, NE, which is Sioux City, IA.

Flight from Seattle to Sioux City $230

Two hours East from Sioux City is Stuart. Someone has got to be heading East.

Just a thought.
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