Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-13-2024, 02:20 PM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2024
Posts: 9
Help with rear heater

Hello all, New to this forum and skoolie life. I've been full time in my van for 2 years, but upon deciding I needed more room I purchased a 2003 Chevy Express 3500 Bluebird Microbird. Seats are out and built the bed platform. I am now in it full time, but still dealing with a couple issues. Can anyone tell me who I would go to for removal of the rear heater? I don't plan on using it and want it out. Also, until I can do that I would love to know why it gets hot to the touch when the bus is running. As far as I know the heater is not turned on, but there may be a switch I'm unaware of. Thank you advance to any that respond. Chasen

Chasen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2024, 11:00 AM   #2
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 473
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird Mini-Bird 24'
Chassis: Chevy P30
Engine: Chevy 6.2L Diesel
So the rear heater should just be a small heat-exchanger (radiator) that is fed antifreeze from the engine.



To remove it, you would need to disconnect the hoses from the tee inside the engine bay (usually passenger side) and drain the lines of the antifreeze. Once the lines are drained, you should be able to backtrack the hoses and remove them as well as the rear radiator and it's protective cover.
Albatross is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2024, 02:33 PM   #3
Bus Crazy
 
mmoore6856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: arkensas
Posts: 1,082
Year: 1997
Coachwork: bluebird
Chassis: chevy
Engine: 3116 catapillar
Rated Cap: 71 now 2 humans 1 cat
if you follow the heater hoses there should be a mechanical shut off valve you need to shut offyou can remove it yourself just have plenty of rags and a wet dry shop vac as it gets messy. drain your radiator first . also check the routing as you may have to loop the ends together to let your other heater get flow
mmoore6856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2024, 02:34 PM   #4
Bus Crazy
 
mmoore6856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: arkensas
Posts: 1,082
Year: 1997
Coachwork: bluebird
Chassis: chevy
Engine: 3116 catapillar
Rated Cap: 71 now 2 humans 1 cat
try to find someone that has your identical bus and did it as there will be lots of opionions here by some that dont even have a bus. just remember what mulder said
mmoore6856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2024, 09:54 PM   #5
Mini-Skoolie
 
Unpluggedone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Meridian, Texas
Posts: 58
Year: 1967
Coachwork: Wayne
Chassis: Dodge S500
Engine: Dodge 318
The heater on most bus’s is always circulating hot water from the engine. The fans blow air across to remove heat. There are usually at least 2 more, one for driver beat and defrost and one on passenger front for heat and defrost. All 3 in your case will be in one big loop, so you need to locate the hose, likely 1” in and out to the rear and connect them together to keep the other heaters working. Let us know where you are located, lots of handy folks more than willing to give you a hand
Unpluggedone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2024, 10:58 PM   #6
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2024
Posts: 9
Thankyou. I am not mechanically inclined at all, but wish I were as it would not only be more convenient, but price effective.
I will have to seek out a professional.
Chasen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2024, 11:02 PM   #7
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2024
Posts: 9
Thanks, There are two valves inline on two different houses underneath the bus. Are these the valves that you are referring to? I feel I need someone that knows what they are doing as opposed to me trying to accomplish this task. I don't want to f it up and create a safety issue out a mechanics bill.
Chasen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-2024, 11:10 PM   #8
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2024
Posts: 9
I'm new to how these forums work and so I apologize for my inability to make if clear who I was responding to in my previous posts. At any rate, thank you all for your replies. I am currently in Palm Springs getting some work done on the bus and attempting to sell the van I've been in for a couple years. It's not easy juggling 2 vehicles on the public streets. The brakes need replacing on the van and it's made things a bit more difficult while trying to sell without putting anymore money into it.
Chasen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2024, 09:01 AM   #9
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 473
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird Mini-Bird 24'
Chassis: Chevy P30
Engine: Chevy 6.2L Diesel
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chasen View Post
Thanks, There are two valves inline on two different houses underneath the bus. Are these the valves that you are referring to? I feel I need someone that knows what they are doing as opposed to me trying to accomplish this task. I don't want to f it up and create a safety issue out a mechanics bill.

Almost certainly, even without seeing them. This is because pretty much everything else on the bus is the sort of thing that you're going to want to be working full-time instead of putting a valve on it.


But, if you are selling the bus... Why bother with disconnecting the rear heater?
I would think it would actually be more worthwhile to leave it as-is, and then let whomever buys it decide if they want that heater or not... Since some people actually do like it.
Albatross is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2024, 02:21 PM   #10
Bus Nut
 
nikitis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2023
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 964
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 29
@Chasen

You can sort of follow what I did in my pictures on this post:
https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/s...tml#post506647

Also you don't have to drain the radiator if you clamp it like I did, it'll hold pressure if you clamp it tight enough.
nikitis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2024, 05:13 PM   #11
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 473
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird Mini-Bird 24'
Chassis: Chevy P30
Engine: Chevy 6.2L Diesel
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikitis View Post
@Chasen

You can sort of follow what I did in my pictures on this post:
https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/s...tml#post506647

Also you don't have to drain the radiator if you clamp it like I did, it'll hold pressure if you clamp it tight enough.

My suggestion was actually to close the valves, and then remove the lines to/from the rear radiator.
Albatross is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2024, 11:12 AM   #12
Bus Nut
 
nikitis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2023
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 964
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Albatross View Post
My suggestion was actually to close the valves, and then remove the lines to/from the rear radiator.
The reason I didn't want to do it close to the valves is that it would lose too much in pressure. My fluid was vacuumed sealed in to prevent cavitation. The distance from the valves to the otherside of the heater was too great and would have lost too much in the length.

If you close it off at the valves, then cut it after the heater, when you release it, the fluid will have to fill into the hose section with air and it will not be vacuumed sealed anymore.
nikitis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2024, 11:29 AM   #13
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 473
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird Mini-Bird 24'
Chassis: Chevy P30
Engine: Chevy 6.2L Diesel
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikitis View Post
The reason I didn't want to do it close to the valves is that it would lose too much in pressure. My fluid was vacuumed sealed in to prevent cavitation. The distance from the valves to the otherside of the heater was too great and would have lost too much in the length.

If you close it off at the valves, then cut it after the heater, when you release it, the fluid will have to fill into the hose section with air and it will not be vacuumed sealed anymore.

Oh, I was talking about closing the valves and removing all of the lines. Sure, you'd lose a gallon or three of coolant, but you'd have a nice ability to plug everything up without opening the system up at all.


Even if there's no valve on the return line, the brief second it would take to plug it back up with a screw or whatever the case might be with that particular system shouldn't actually leave it exposed to air since you'd have all of the coolant flowing back down and out of the hose.


The pull the hoses with the heater, since it doesn't really make sense to have all of that hose length with no load and little heat-transfer, unless you're really serious about having that massive of a reservoir of anti-freeze. Especially considering that those hoses would make it more difficult to flush or re-fill when the next time for service comes along.
Albatross is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-25-2024, 01:02 PM   #14
Bus Crazy
 
mmoore6856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: arkensas
Posts: 1,082
Year: 1997
Coachwork: bluebird
Chassis: chevy
Engine: 3116 catapillar
Rated Cap: 71 now 2 humans 1 cat
What happens to the vacume when the water gets up to 200 degrees? If it was under any vacume the hoses would collapse
mmoore6856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

« Hello | Hello »
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.