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Old 07-19-2020, 02:01 PM   #41
Skoolie
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lubbock Jason View Post
CoffeeFreak I mean CoffeeGuy. Lol ��

People today only care about themselves and are entitled
I am not that harsh in my assessment of people, but I get what you're saying. I'd like to think that folks who are aiming at living full time in a skoolie are a bit less materialistic and less willing to take advantage of others.

I have always considered whether I could let go of so many possessions that I could live on a sailboat or something like that. I never believed I could do it, because I have so much stuff and so many interests.

We're giving ourselves 2-3 years to get our bus the way we want it. In the meantime, I'm going to learn how much I can let go of possessions so that we can ride the waves on our asphalt sailboat.

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Old 07-19-2020, 03:54 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by CoffeeGuy View Post
I am not that harsh in my assessment of people, but I get what you're saying. I'd like to think that folks who are aiming at living full time in a skoolie are a bit less materialistic and less willing to take advantage of others.

I have always considered whether I could let go of so many possessions that I could live on a sailboat or something like that. I never believed I could do it, because I have so much stuff and so many interests.

We're giving ourselves 2-3 years to get our bus the way we want it. In the meantime, I'm going to learn how much I can let go of possessions so that we can ride the waves on our asphalt sailboat.


Guess I should have said a majority of people, didnít mean to put everyone in that category.

Iím in the same boat as you with the collection of possession. My camping, fishing and tools takes up a small village
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Old 07-19-2020, 05:55 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by CoffeeGuy View Post
I am not that harsh in my assessment of people, but I get what you're saying. I'd like to think that folks who are aiming at living full time in a skoolie are a bit less materialistic and less willing to take advantage of others.

I have always considered whether I could let go of so many possessions that I could live on a sailboat or something like that. I never believed I could do it, because I have so much stuff and so many interests.

We're giving ourselves 2-3 years to get our bus the way we want it. In the meantime, I'm going to learn how much I can let go of possessions so that we can ride the waves on our asphalt sailboat.
In the last month I cleaned out my house of 24 years, gave away or threw away most of my possessions and what's left is in a single 6x12' trailer, some of which will end up on the bus. The house went on the market last Thursday and I signed the contract to sell on Sunday. It's been a trumatic experience and not one I would recommend to anyone. I've got to get my bus ready to roll by the end of October because I have no intention of leaving it here in New Jersey for the winter. I may end up living in an empty shell with odd furniture scattered around inside, this assuming I can get insurance. Yea I wouldn't recommend anyone do it the way I am.
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Old 07-19-2020, 10:25 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by Lubbock Jason View Post
Iím in the same boat as you with the collection of possession. My camping, fishing and tools takes up a small village
For me it's mostly music stuff. I have more guitars, mandolins, fiddles, banjos, and other sundry instruments than anyone I know. It used to be hard to think about letting go of them, especially some of the more rare and desirable, but I've gone a couple years without touching most of them. I have my favorites and I'll hang on to those.
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Old 07-19-2020, 10:40 PM   #45
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In the last month I cleaned out my house of 24 years, gave away or threw away most of my possessions and what's left is in a single 6x12' trailer, some of which will end up on the bus...

,,,It's been a trumatic experience and not one I would recommend to anyone
Yeah, that seems just a bit like too much pressure for me. My wife is planning on us putting some of our more treasured things in storage, because we'll probably want a home again someday. I have a cherry wood chef's table that I made about 20 years ago that i'd like to hang onto, but I'd be happy just keeping it in the family. Some of the musical instruments are family heirlooms, they'll go to my daughter, as she is a multi-instrumentalist like me and my grandfather.

But beyond that, what is sentimental value really worth? In some sense, sentiment is an anchor that holds you to your past. Fine for some people, not necessarily great for others. Rather, I should say "poison" for others.

I'm enamored with the potential simplicity of a life on the road. Really, you bring your world with you, it costs far less to live small, and the decision to stay or go is usually yours to bargain with. Not everybody is suited for that sort of lifestyle, but I think I chose my life companion well. We both just roll with things when they go sideways.
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Old 07-20-2020, 01:28 AM   #46
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I just talked with the guy I bought the bus from in Jacksonville, he had his mechanic remove the radiator and they got a new one installed, but there are a couple of cracked hoses that he's going to take care of first thing Monday. If all goes well, I may fly down from Indiana Monday afternoon/evening and start the trip home Tuesday morning.

Looking at routes home, I decided to avoid Cumberland Gap in Tennessee and instead drive to Tallahassee and then north through Birmingham and Nashville. It's only an hour longer but It should be an easier ride.

Our friends just bought a similar bus, and just got it home yesterday. We're going to be helping each other with our conversions. Things are going to get interesting!
We made a similar trip in May. Took off from Cocoa, FL up I-95 through Jacksonville, FL. We kept going north on I95 to I-26 through South Carolina and North Carolia. Then on through the Great Smoky Mountains and through Indianapolis, IN. It is a nice trip.


You are fortunate to have a friend with a bus at the same stage It will keep both buses moving along.
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Old 07-20-2020, 06:04 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by CoffeeGuy View Post
For me it's mostly music stuff. I have more guitars, mandolins, fiddles, banjos, and other sundry instruments than anyone I know. It used to be hard to think about letting go of them, especially some of the more rare and desirable, but I've gone a couple years without touching most of them. I have my favorites and I'll hang on to those.
A really nice mandolin is a thing of exceptional beauty and worth holding onto.

I have one instrument, and I only dabble. But the tenor guitar is pretty cool and easy to play Irish tunes on.
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Old 07-20-2020, 07:53 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by CoffeeGuy View Post
Yeah, that seems just a bit like too much pressure for me. My wife is planning on us putting some of our more treasured things in storage, because we'll probably want a home again someday. I have a cherry wood chef's table that I made about 20 years ago that i'd like to hang onto, but I'd be happy just keeping it in the family. Some of the musical instruments are family heirlooms, they'll go to my daughter, as she is a multi-instrumentalist like me and my grandfather.

But beyond that, what is sentimental value really worth? In some sense, sentiment is an anchor that holds you to your past. Fine for some people, not necessarily great for others. Rather, I should say "poison" for others.

I'm enamored with the potential simplicity of a life on the road. Really, you bring your world with you, it costs far less to live small, and the decision to stay or go is usually yours to bargain with. Not everybody is suited for that sort of lifestyle, but I think I chose my life companion well. We both just roll with things when they go sideways.
Looking forward to heading down this path together CoffeGuy. I'm glad that my briefcase of harmonicas doesn't take too much space!
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Old 07-20-2020, 08:06 AM   #49
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WYou are fortunate to have a friend with a bus at the same stage It will keep both buses moving along.
Yes! And he just jumped on this thread! Hi Paul!
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Old 07-20-2020, 08:12 AM   #50
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
A really nice mandolin is a thing of exceptional beauty and worth holding onto.

I have one instrument, and I only dabble. But the tenor guitar is pretty cool and easy to play Irish tunes on.
If it were only 1 really nice mandolin... I'll keep the one I play on stage, and the Sobell, and pass the 1928 Gibson that was my grandfather's to my daughter. I'm less attached to the others.

Tenor guitar is a blast for playing Irish tunes! The neck is just a little long, but it sounds so nice and I really like the sustain. At trad sessions I rarely bring it out since you can't really hear it over the fiddles, flutes and accordions.Tenor banjo, however... now there's a weapon!
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Old 07-20-2020, 09:13 AM   #51
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If it were only 1 really nice mandolin... I'll keep the one I play on stage, and the Sobell, and pass the 1928 Gibson that was my grandfather's to my daughter. I'm less attached to the others.

Tenor guitar is a blast for playing Irish tunes! The neck is just a little long, but it sounds so nice and I really like the sustain. At trad sessions I rarely bring it out since you can't really hear it over the fiddles, flutes and accordions.Tenor banjo, however... now there's a weapon!
I had a tenor banjo. that thing was a blast but just not my style.
I tried mandolin for quite a while but I'm just not much of a musician. Had a handmade mandolin from a luthier in GA named Barry Kratzer. Gave it to a real musician I know as a gift.
Nothing sounds better than a real old Gibson that's been taken care of. Nothing at all really.
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Old 07-20-2020, 11:33 AM   #52
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you bring your world with you, it costs far less to live small, and the decision to stay or go is usually yours to bargain with. Not everybody is suited for that sort of lifestyle, but I think I chose my life companion well. We both just roll with things when they go sideways.


Well said sir, thanks for sharing your start with with us.
Carry on
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Old 07-20-2020, 08:02 PM   #53
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I had a tenor banjo. that thing was a blast but just not my style.
I tried mandolin for quite a while but I'm just not much of a musician. Had a handmade mandolin from a luthier in GA named Barry Kratzer. Gave it to a real musician I know as a gift.
Nothing sounds better than a real old Gibson that's been taken care of. Nothing at all really.
I generally prefer the sound of a clawhammer banjo, but in trad Irish circles, a short-neck tenor banjo like an early 1920's Gibson has a great sound and adds a percussive snap to the tunes. You can definitely hear it among a wall of fiddles.

Barry (Bulldog Mandolins) Kratzer is fairly well known in mandolin circles. He builds a fine instrument and does some beautiful inlay work. My "stage" mandolin is build by a guy out in New Mexico, Bill Bussman. He's also pretty well known, though he's someone who gets the aesthetic details 95% and the sound 120%. If people look for flaws, they find 'em, but if you close your eyes and listen, you sure can't! I have a couple of his, an A style mandolin and an octave mandolin. Really, both are keepers. (Honey, we might need a bigger bus!)
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Old 07-20-2020, 08:03 PM   #54
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And the big news is...

My bus is ready.

I'm flying down to Jacksonville tomorrow and will start working my way back home in the evening.

Fingers crossed!!!
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Old 07-20-2020, 09:43 PM   #55
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And the big news is...

My bus is ready.

I'm flying down to Jacksonville tomorrow and will start working my way back home in the evening.

Fingers crossed!!!
Good luck. Still going through Tallahassee? I'm off the 95 in Savannah. Buy you lunch if you end up this way instead.
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Old 07-20-2020, 11:02 PM   #56
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Good luck. Still going through Tallahassee? I'm off the 95 in Savannah. Buy you lunch if you end up this way instead.
I would love to cruise up the eastern seaboard and definitely would like to check out Savannah, but with this trip happening during the week rather than the weekend, I need to push through. The beans don't get roasted if the guy with the keys to the shop doesn't show up for work!

I do appreciate the offer, though!
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Old 07-21-2020, 03:12 AM   #57
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Enjoy your trip home. Be careful. It will be a LONG drive.
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Old 07-23-2020, 12:02 AM   #58
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Made it!

I just got home with our Blue Bird AARE, and it made the trip from Jacksonville, FL to Evansville, IN without any major hitches.

I did discover in the last hours of the drive that something funky is going on with the taillights, they would work for awhile, then not, and then come back, then go out again. It seemed pretty random. I would guess there's a bad ground or the circuit breaker is flaking out.

It was a long, lonely drive, but I got pretty comfortable with the ~800 miles. Averaged 8.4 mpg, with the motor governed at 62 mph/2,150 rpm (as far as I could estimate).

It's nice to start out with a shakedown cruise. Hopefully now and for the foreseeable future, it's smooth sailing.
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Old 07-23-2020, 02:40 AM   #59
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So glad you had a good drive home. Your standard drivetrain setup seems reasonable for the open road. Good deal!
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Old 07-23-2020, 10:54 PM   #60
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So glad you had a good drive home. Your standard drivetrain setup seems reasonable for the open road. Good deal!
Thank you! I would love to get closer to 10mpg, if it's possible. 6th gear unlock is likely in my future, and any power/efficiency boost that's not smoke and mirrors would be an option, if such a thing exists.

Here's a quick pic in her (his?) new home, with the back of the bus right by the door to my woodshop and tool crib.
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