Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-04-2020, 08:26 PM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 6
Cool The I do too much research guy

Howdy, been on here for a few months. I'm about a year away from starting my skoolie project, so I'm soaking up all the data, opinions, facts vs. "facts", and forms and functions in my quest to put together my full time home.

I'm planning on bringing along my motorcycle(s) so including a rear area with room for two motorcycles is a central theme in all of my design ideas. A roof raise is on the "must haves" list as well.
enigmamdw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2020, 08:39 PM   #2
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Suburbs of Winterset, OH
Posts: 115
Year: 2005
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: FS65
Engine: Mercedes 6.4L
I wonder if a handicap lift would be powerful enough to lift a bike? Figure a 100# chair and a 200#+ chair occupant....not sure if an attendant rides up on the lift too.
Something else for you to research...
BarnYardCamp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2020, 08:49 PM   #3
Mini-Skoolie
 
BaconFarms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Eagle River Wisconsin
Posts: 65
Year: 2001
Coachwork: Gillig
Chassis: Low Floor Bus
Engine: Cummins ISL diesel 540 cu in
Rated Cap: 32
Lightest ones I've read lift about 600 pounds, other are 800-1100 pounds, etc. Can get just about what you want. Used, try and find a label with the rating or look up the manufacturer, etc.

BaconFarms
BaconFarms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2020, 09:49 AM   #4
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 6
Yup, as stated above most are rated at 800 pounds. I ride a sport bike and a dirt bike. I could ride up with a bike and not tax the system. I got the idea from You Tube-r Moto Giant.
enigmamdw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2020, 09:56 AM   #5
Bus Geek
 
brokedown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Weeki Wachee, FL
Posts: 3,019
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: Cummins 5.9
Rated Cap: 72
One of our friends carries their harley inside their bus and their wheelchair lift is not able to lift it... They use it to hold a ramp instead.
__________________
Keep up with us and our build!
Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter
brokedown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2020, 12:15 PM   #6
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 21,432
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freighliner FS65
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by BarnYardCamp View Post
I wonder if a handicap lift would be powerful enough to lift a bike? Figure a 100# chair and a 200#+ chair occupant....not sure if an attendant rides up on the lift too.
Something else for you to research...
MSot are rated for 800 lbs.
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2020, 12:20 PM   #7
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Greater Houston, Tx.
Posts: 583
800lbs is right for most lifts.. Not sure if hogs, or larger road bikes will work, but even larger dirt, or dual sports, will.
Look at Dreadman's buses.
1olfart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2020, 01:58 PM   #8
Bus Nut
 
ermracing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Unity, NH
Posts: 435
Year: 2003
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DT466E (195hp, 520tq)
Rated Cap: 29,000
Ours is rated for 800lbs (Brawn), which as the others have stated, is pretty typical. The largest measured load we've used it for so far is lifting the 500lbs of deep cycle batteries into the bus. It handled it without an issue. Our future toy is a BMW Isetta which tips the scale at 750lbs, but it won't fit through the opening.....
__________________
Dave
ermracing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2020, 02:55 PM   #9
Bus Geek
 
o1marc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Dawsonville, Ga.
Posts: 9,030
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Genesis
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/3060
Rated Cap: 77
If you read into limits, that 800lb capacity says it will hold 1200lbs, but we don't recommend it. A new Harley Street Glide weighs just over 825lbs. My Vulcan is over 750lbs. I would imagine the lift will handle any bike that will fit on the lift. The ramp will need to be modified in length.
__________________
I Thank God That He Gifted Me with Common Sense
o1marc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2020, 02:59 PM   #10
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 12,814
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Carpenter
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DTA360 / MT643
Rated Cap: 7 Row Handicap
modifying(lengthening) the ramp is going to change the capacity of that lift.. you have a longer "lever" pulling in a different direction on the lift, its supports, and mechanism.. all has to be calculated
cadillackid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2020, 03:22 PM   #11
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 21,432
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freighliner FS65
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
modifying(lengthening) the ramp is going to change the capacity of that lift.. you have a longer "lever" pulling in a different direction on the lift, its supports, and mechanism.. all has to be calculated
Yes, this is true! ^^
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2020, 03:32 PM   #12
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 6
Insightful comments, all (thanks).

I have considered these points as well, The ramp will have a sliding rail extension of 1.5 feet. The heavier of my motorcycles is well under #400 pounds (think Yamaha R1/Ducati 999 on ridiculous TI/Carbon fiber weight loss diet).

The torsional change/ modified weight distribution is shared with the reinforced lift areas and "should" be more than adequate for my application. I have seen several of these lifts in action with similar weight loads and dimensions. So, fingers crossed. As always using something not as designed must be done with catastrophic failure and problems included in expectations.
enigmamdw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2020, 08:40 AM   #13
Almost There
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 75
Year: 2001
Coachwork: Girardian Handicapped Commercial
Chassis: E-450
Engine: Ford 7.3L
Rated Cap: 9,000
Weight limits aside- Other than the potential to lift motor bikes in and out of a storage location, or lifting heavy item into the bus at time of build. What other benefits are lift gates?
mc11237 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2020, 08:46 AM   #14
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 21,432
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freighliner FS65
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mc11237 View Post
Weight limits aside- Other than the potential to lift motor bikes in and out of a storage location, or lifting heavy item into the bus at time of build. What other benefits are lift gates?
I don't keep them ever. They rattle horribly and are one of the first things to go when I get one.
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2020, 09:02 AM   #15
Almost There
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 75
Year: 2001
Coachwork: Girardian Handicapped Commercial
Chassis: E-450
Engine: Ford 7.3L
Rated Cap: 9,000
Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
I don't keep them ever. They rattle horribly and are one of the first things to go when I get one.
I never thought I would use one but then I saw a bus I liked everything else about. So it got me thinking, if the bus I decide to get has one what to do with it. Once you remove the ramp do you find any added benefits to having the extra door?
mc11237 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2020, 09:14 AM   #16
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 21,432
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freighliner FS65
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by mc11237 View Post
I never thought I would use one but then I saw a bus I liked everything else about. So it got me thinking, if the bus I decide to get has one what to do with it. Once you remove the ramp do you find any added benefits to having the extra door?
Well- its a door, and the widest one on the bus.
Mines in the front, my last 2 were in the rear.

It really makes it feel airy in the bus when you're parked with that door open.
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2020, 10:54 AM   #17
Bus Nut
 
ermracing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Unity, NH
Posts: 435
Year: 2003
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International 3800
Engine: DT466E (195hp, 520tq)
Rated Cap: 29,000
The w/c lift was an integral part of our use for the bus. The rear 4 windows is a workshop for our racing endeavors as well as my 'garage' space when we ultimately downsize. When we go racing we load in a 6500w generator (on wheels), a welding cart, grill and 10x15 popup canopy into the back so the lift is used for that.
__________________
Dave
ermracing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2020, 10:58 AM   #18
Bus Nut
 
Mountain Gnome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 514
Year: 1999
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: TC1000 HandyBus
Engine: 5.9L 24V-L6 Cummins ISB
Rated Cap: 26 foot
Quote:
Originally Posted by mc11237 View Post
Weight limits aside- Other than the potential to lift motor bikes in and out of a storage location, or lifting heavy item into the bus at time of build. What other benefits are lift gates?

I've heard so many annoyingly loud rattling lifts in commuter buses that I've ridden. Luckily for me, mine doesn't, as long as I keep it pumped up to full-up; then is gets snug-tight! Even when it starts to loose pressure and get a bit loose, it's not so bad I would think.



I love my extra door, lets the fresh air in, and gets me closer to being outside. I'm thinking of setting up a retractable awning over just the wheelchair door and lift, perhaps with clear-plastic shower-curtain that can tack up there and hang around the sides, and then I can have a deck that I can sit outside on, and still be the same height as the bus' floor. When it rains, I can sit out there and be dry, and not be standing in a mud-puddle. Or if it rained all night but sunny in the morning, and everything is muddy outside, again, I have my deck to sit on, without tracking the mud in and out of the bus.


Reminds me of Roger Waters in The Wall concert. During the first set, stage-hands build a 20+ foot high wall between the audience and the band. In the middle of the second set, a hole opens up and Roger comes out on a platform, sitting in a chair and watching TV.



Tailgaters at games I hear haul their charcoal or gas grills in their bus, then roll them out onto the half-lowered lift so the grill is outside, but they can stay in the bus and tend to it. Or if the lot will allow, you can lower the grill down to the ground and cook in the space behind your bus.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 0108201152a[1].jpg (144.7 KB, 8 views)
Mountain Gnome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2020, 01:32 PM   #19
Almost There
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 75
Year: 2001
Coachwork: Girardian Handicapped Commercial
Chassis: E-450
Engine: Ford 7.3L
Rated Cap: 9,000
Wow lots of great ideas! Thanks!!! Awesome "wall" pic Mountain gnome
mc11237 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×