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Old 12-20-2017, 03:11 PM   #1
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Woody skoolie

Hi,
I am max, my bus and me are park in Atlanta Georgia. I started my conversion last year, now itís complete. I still have a few things to fix up and need some help with. Also I am here to share my conversion experience.
I have a 1993 Thomas international short bus 320 000 miles on it, done a few big trips with it and itís my full time home.
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Old 12-20-2017, 03:19 PM   #2
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Welcome.
Looking good.
I like the exterior woody style. Wonder if I could pull that look off on my full size bus.
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Old 12-20-2017, 03:21 PM   #3
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Thank you, the wooden panel rase up to cover the window when to much sun or for privacy. But I will explain it all in a appropriate post
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Old 12-20-2017, 03:25 PM   #4
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Yes welcome and nice work inside and out. Will be following for sure here.

John
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Old 12-20-2017, 03:30 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by mcfly View Post
Thank you, the wooden panel rase up to cover the window when to much sun or for privacy. But I will explain it all in a appropriate post
I was going to ask if they were just looks or were functional as well.
I was just thinking how I could make the look and use them as a fold down table.i already have fashioned a hideaway sink and two burner top for that side when stopped but that idea would help expand my idea.
Using them as an awning is cool as hell to?
I like it.
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Old 12-20-2017, 07:06 PM   #6
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That is one sweet bus!
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Old 12-20-2017, 07:32 PM   #7
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Very nicely done, inside and out.

I 'woodified' my Blazer about 10 years ago......have been pondering using some on my bus build, but still undecided. Your's looks great.


Don
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Old 12-20-2017, 09:40 PM   #8
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Nice idea! I was thinking of 16 individual window "inserts" made from sheet metal covered in wool or other insulation from the inside. outside is so much better! No need for storage space for the covers. remote controlled electrically powered covers so when it rains, you are not in the elements.

However, my friend used to park his VW bus in downtown Jackson Hole, WY, where it is illegal to sleep in your vehicle overnight. He would cover his windows from the inside with black plastic garbage bags so when cops showed up, they just got a mirror effect with flashlights. He was just another car in a parking lot. Looking like you are hiding makes that harder...
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:42 PM   #9
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Hi, Love the bus! I am a newbie to the site and to owning a school bus..you are my first post-question. I want to attach wood down the sides of Ivy ( less I have to paint and sand) Here's the question, do i need to bolt the wood on through the walls or can I just use metal screws? Maybe glue? What do you think?
I will post some pictures when I can figure out the site better.
Thank you in advance
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Old 02-12-2018, 12:52 PM   #10
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You're going to put something on the side of your bus that you know will hold water? You must live in a dry climate. Either way, have you ever looked into using a wrap? Any graphic can be applied.
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Old 02-12-2018, 01:11 PM   #11
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Hi, Yes I live in the desert. I want to put real wood on the side. I will finish the wood with Marine Grade....something. Any suggestions on attachment?
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Old 02-12-2018, 04:34 PM   #12
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I think that the suggestion of using self tapping stainless steel screws is a good idea.

If you want to be able to remove it in the future stick with just screws. If you want it more permanent then use 3M 5200, Sikaflex or similar adhesive along with the screws.
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Old 02-12-2018, 06:03 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IvyRoseAndGreenGum View Post
Hi, Yes I live in the desert. I want to put real wood on the side. I will finish the wood with Marine Grade....something. Any suggestions on attachment?
When I woodyfied my Blazer, I originally used self-tapping screws on each board......but they eventually worked loose due to vibration/flexing from moderate off-roading. So I took them all down and fastened the boards to each other (on the backside) by using hurricane strap material about every 18-20". Then, when I remounted the boards on my truck, I bolted only the top and bottom boards to the body.....the straps allowed the boards to flex. I actually used eye bolts to provide tie-down points.

I found that marine spar varnish is about the best protectant for your wood. You definitely will need to re-varnish every two or three years, depending on how much the varnish is exposed to the sun. I've never lived in the desert.....might be a yearly thing there. I never had any rust issues under the wood....I had glued some small 1/8" thick blocks in a random pattern on the backside of the boards, so they allowed air flow between the boards and the quarter panels. Plenty of air flow at 60 mph.

I'm sure I'll have some wood on my bus somewhere.....I'm pretty sure the original rub-rails on buses were made of 2x4s.
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Old 02-12-2018, 06:56 PM   #14
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Is that on those old school buses they called wooden wagons?
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Old 02-12-2018, 07:42 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
I think that the suggestion of using self tapping stainless steel screws is a good idea.

If you want to be able to remove it in the future stick with just screws. If you want it more permanent then use 3M 5200, Sikaflex or similar adhesive along with the screws.
Thank you, good suggestions!
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Old 02-12-2018, 08:03 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plfking View Post
When I woodyfied my Blazer, I originally used self-tapping screws on each board......but they eventually worked loose due to vibration/flexing from moderate off-roading. So I took them all down and fastened the boards to each other (on the backside) by using hurricane strap material about every 18-20". Then, when I remounted the boards on my truck, I bolted only the top and bottom boards to the body.....the straps allowed the boards to flex. I actually used eye bolts to provide tie-down points.

I found that marine spar varnish is about the best protectant for your wood. You definitely will need to re-varnish every two or three years, depending on how much the varnish is exposed to the sun. I've never lived in the desert.....might be a yearly thing there. I never had any rust issues under the wood....I had glued some small 1/8" thick blocks in a random pattern on the backside of the boards, so they allowed air flow between the boards and the quarter panels. Plenty of air flow at 60 mph.

I'm sure I'll have some wood on my bus somewhere.....I'm pretty sure the original rub-rails on buses were made of 2x4s.
I love it! Thank you!!! I am just framing the walls inside so this is a good time to bolt them down if I get to do it. I have some metal spacers they used under the seats....that would work. And a ton of bolts, washers & nuts. I saved everything to reuse. Excellent!
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Old 02-12-2018, 09:52 PM   #17
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Quote:
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Is that on those old school buses they called wooden wagons?
I'm not quite THAT old. My school-bus-riding years were mid-60s to mid-70s....almost positive those buses had wooden rub rails painted black.
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