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Old 05-22-2020, 09:43 AM   #21
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Check YouTube On The Bus, a 10 month skoolie trip through South America. Also on Instagram, @impact.overland although he’s in a van/motorcycle with his brother. He’s stuck right now because of virus/border crossing restrictions. He seems willing to answer questions, maybe he’s seen skoolies down there.

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Old 05-22-2020, 11:02 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biscuitsjam View Post
I'm curious how possible it is... I've read of people shipping skoolies to Europe and driving them there, but never to South America.

You couldn't drive further than the Darien Gap in Panama, then you'd have to ship it on a cargo ship to Columbia. What about further south? Are the roads big enough and good enough for a bus to travel to most places? Would spare parts be available? Any legal issues driving a giant modified bus? What about fuel prices? How bad of a problem is contaminated fuel? How hard would it be to find camping spots for such a large vehicle?

Yes, I know security is a major concern, but I would rather not discuss that here. In other words, I'm asking "is it possible?" not "is it wise?"

Apparently there are three bridges where you can drive over the Panama canal, one of them is the pan american highway official crossing.

https://traveltips.usatoday.com/ther...car-37680.html

Back in the Mid eighties I used to drive school busses and trucks with my dad from NJ to Honduras so I have a little bit of experience, but not down to the Panama canal.

There are NO official camping spots! We would not travel at night so we always planned out trip to known safe areas such as gas stations or restaurants. Both these locations typically had armed guards at night so we just asked for permission to park for the evening and yes, tipped the guards very well. And yes we slept in the bus because if you didn't...IT WILL GET BROKEN INTO!!!

When crossing Mexico, Guatemala and Honduras you did have the option to "Hire" a federale or a State guard (soldier) for the purposes of holding your paperwork and dealing with unknown characters along the way who wish to try to you no good. Also, we never traveled alone, always in caravan of at least three other vehicles.

I can share many stories on how we encountered many roadblocks in which basically the local residents of an area will block the highway and will solicit you for a donation. Expect this and don't complain. It is much easier to give a donation of $10-20 dollars than be subjected to getting totally robbed of everything you got.

Back then we used to purchase low dollar electronics (in dash cassette radios and watches) and give them out as gifts along the way.

One trip we had our paid Federale almost get into a gun battle with local corrupt traffic cops who wanted nothing more than a couple of dollars so they could go get lunch. We gave them $20 bucks and went on our merry way.

Spare parts availability...If your bus utilizes and electronic computer...bring a spare with you just in case as you will not find one of those easily in Central America. Engine parts, tires and stuff...no worries. If they don't have one they will modify something to fit and work!
I have seen it done !!!

The pan american highway is suitable for tractor trailers, I know because I have done it, twice! NJ to Honduras, 5,000 miles!

Roads though many times are very rough and don't ever expect to be cruising at over 50mph!
It not so much the roads you have to worry about, it is the loose farm animals who WILL come out of nowhere when you least expect it and besides...what's the hurry?

Back in the eighties there was alot of human rights violations, kidnappings. Nicaragua was a hot bed of violence.

Today it is all a hotbed of violence, still have human rights issues and kidnappings but if you stay on the main highways during the day and DO NOT TRAVEL at night you should be ok.
If you venture into the small towns, try to find a place where there is an armed watchman, ask for permission and offer to pay him something. You will be amazed on how easy it can be,

Also, I would definitely have video cameras both inside and outside the bus, documenting any and all people interaction that may occur. You never know what can happen!

There are people making the same drive every day. The way I look at it, living in Miami you got to be strapped to be safe and the highways, at such a high speed, are more dangerous than the roads in Mexico, but that is just my opinion.

If you make the trip, leave all your valuables at home, travel with only the things you can afford to loose.
Hide you cash and credit cards in several locations and try to look poor. If you travel like the rich and famous, you WILL get harassed!

If I had the chance to get away from my business for 30 days, I would definitely make the trip again!
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Old 05-22-2020, 11:26 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ewo1 View Post
Apparently there are three bridges where you can drive over the Panama canal, one of them is the pan american highway official crossing.
While it is possible to cross the Panama Canal, the road ends at the "Darien Gap," a 60-mile expanse of broken terrain followed by marshland in southern Panama and northern Colombia. Additionally, there is no ferry. The only way to get a vehicle further south is to put it on a cargo ship. The price is significantly cheaper for vehicles that will fit in cargo containers like vans and small RVs.

Quote:
Back in the Mid eighties I used to drive school busses and trucks with my dad from NJ to Honduras so I have a little bit of experience, but not down to the Panama canal.
...
If I had the chance to get away from my business for 30 days, I would definitely make the trip again!
Awesome story! Sounds like a lot of fun.


As a side note, it seems like it would be interesting to sightsee with a bus. Could you actually get up to the tourist sites, or would you need to leave your skoolie at a secure parking area? Then, taxi or toad? I get nervous leaving my bus at the entrances to hiking trails in the U.S. now, so I can imagine how nerve racking it must be there.
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Old 05-22-2020, 11:38 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by Biscuitsjam View Post
While it is possible to cross the Panama Canal, the road ends at the "Darien Gap," a 60-mile expanse of broken terrain followed by marshland in southern Panama and northern Colombia. Additionally, there is no ferry. The only way to get a vehicle further south is to put it on a cargo ship. The price is significantly cheaper for vehicles that will fit in cargo containers like vans and small RVs.

Awesome story! Sounds like a lot of fun.


As a side note, it seems like it would be interesting to sightsee with a bus. Could you actually get up to the tourist sites, or would you need to leave your skoolie at a secure parking area? Then, taxi or toad? I get nervous leaving my bus at the entrances to hiking trails in the U.S. now, so I can imagine how nerve racking it must be there.
Just as likely or even more likely to get burglarized in the US
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Old 05-22-2020, 01:05 PM   #25
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I got an "instant quote" on shipping from Panama to Colombia. If I understand it right, the cost is $5791, but your vehicle is sitting unsecured at the port for several days at each end. Maybe you'd want to ship some of your stuff (generators, solar panels, etc.) As a "container buddy" with someone else?

Quote:
Request ID: Q514494
Thank you for submitting a shipping quotation request

Shipment Type: Temporary Import
Shipping Date: 21/08/2020
POL: Panama
POD: Colombia

Vehicle Make / Model / Year: International 3000 1998
VIN: Tbc Country of Registration: United States
Vehicle Dimensions: L 10.98m, W 2.44m, H 3.30m
CBM: 88.41 Weight: 11,790
Services: RORO
Shipping Insurance: All Risks Restricted (Excl CDSM) (0.9%) 10000

Route Code: CentralAmericaCOSouthAmerica / 4
Comments:



RORO
We can offer the following RORO rates from Manzanillo, Panama to Cartagena, Colombia.

Fast Ship 2/3 days – Panama - Cartagena
Shipping charge (inc BAF,LSL,BL) $ 4,474
Panama THC $ 100
Booking & Doc Fee $ 175
Local Fees Panama (Estimate) $ 80 (paid at the port)
Local helper for clearing (in person) $ 85
(please note the prices are the same for both fast ships)

Import Fees paid direct in Colombia
Import costs $877
*Inclusive of THC, Port fees, documentation and local agent (estimate only)
*Fees are charged according to the size and weight of vehicle, payable in COP at the days exchange rate, 5% discount on import fees if paying in cash - subject to change

Customs clearance and agents
Our quotation includes an agent to help you in person at the port in Panama, and also an agent in Colombia to help you with the import process, the use of the agents both for export and import is required.

Latest Schedules
Schedules are normally available 2 months in advance. For the latest schedules please see our website

*Please note there are two services from Panama to Colombia, however the second service ( slow boat) we do not ship on any longer, due to the vessel transshipping in Kingston Jamaica, there is a higher risk of theft and damage, therefore generally we would not recommend shipping on the service. If you are shipping a unit which is completely empty, and we can quote on the service.

*Flatrack - we do not recommend shipping on flat rack on this route, as we are aware they have been the higher number of thefts and in particular damage to vehicles throughout the process. Generally the vehicles are left in quay in both ports

Cut off (RORO)
Normally cut off is 2-3 working days prior to sailing and you need at least 1 day for the Police inspection.
Expect to be able to retrieve your vehicle in Colombia 3-4 working days after its arrival. This is dependent on a number of factors (the carrier invoicing for freight & local charges on time and whether the vehicle arrives near or on the weekend or not).

Cleaning
All cargo must be cleaned internally and externally prior to delivery to the port, the vehicle must be free of any mud, dirt, grease or any other contamination. Cargo will be inspected on arrival in Colombia and may be subject to additional charges if they do not meet local requirements. The carrier may on request ask for evidence of cleaning, so please keep your receipt and take some photos of the vehicle being cleaned. It is the shippers / cargo owners responsibility to ensure they meet any requirements.

Insurance
We can offer Marine cargo insurance, If requested, insurance will be charged as a % of the insured value (vehicle value + shipping costs) on top of the fees quoted above. We are able to offer either All risks - excluding chips, dents, scratches and marring (0.9%) & Total Loss (0.6%) on this route.

Bookings
Bookings can be made 3 months to 3 weeks in advance of departure.

To Make the booking could you please provide me the following:
- Copy of Vehicle Registration / Title (USA Vehicles)
- Copy of passport
- Address in Panama & Colombia (can be a hotel or another address)
- Copy of the TIP & Insurance That you received when you entered Panama (or when you do enter)
- Confirmation of which currency you would like to pay in (£$€)
- Confirmation of whether you would like Marine Cargo insurance

Please note the ships can sometimes run late, generally, we advise not to book flights until your shipment has departed.

Payments
We can accept payment by bank transfer to accounts held in the USA ($), United Kingdom (£), Germany (€) and Australia (AUD$). We do not accept payments in cash.

Payment is due 5 working days prior to the vessel’s cut-off date.

Further questions & FAQ's
If you have any other questions please do not hesitate to contact us by replying directly to this email, you can also read through our frequently asked questions here: IVSS Shipping FAQ’s

Note
*Insurance (if required) is charged as a % of the insured value on top of the above fees.
*Note local fees are paid direct – they are estimates and may change without notice and are not contractual just for information only.
*Both carriers state Gas bottles are not allowed, you should ensure if you have any they are fully empty.
*Shipping dates can change or be cancelled without notice.
*Rates valid for 14 days, prices are subject to change, exchange rates, BAF, LSL are variable.
*A clearing agent/helper is mandatory in each port for both Fast ships.
*Any personal effects or items left in your vehicle are taken entirely at your own risk

More information & Schedules
For the latest schedules and further information please see our website:https://ivssuk.com/shipping-across-t...a-to-colombia/

Any questions please do not hesitate to ask.

Kind Regards

Nicole Cardozo
IVSS
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Old 05-22-2020, 08:51 PM   #26
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
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Coachwork: Amtran RE
Chassis: International 3000
Engine: T444e 7.3L
Just out of curiosity, I looked up U.S. to Europe shipping rates.... It is about the same as Panama to Colombia!!!!



Export - Shipping (inc. BAF,LSL,BL)
East Coast (Baltimore, Brun, Charls) $4,836
East Coast (Baltimore) $ 4,394
East Coast (Jacksonville) $4,335
Southern Coast (Houston/ Galveston) $3,904 / $4,836
West Coast (Tacoma, Long Beach) $11,201



Export Costs
AES, Docs & Port fees $400
An escort is required for US ports, expect the cost to be between $50 - $125, depending on port.


Import
Import Costs (EU Ports / UK Ports) €250-€325
(Port Fees, THC and Customs clearance, does not include any taxes or duties.)
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Old 05-22-2020, 09:47 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
It would be interesting to build a tiny house that fits exactly within an unaltered shipping container with a removable roof. You could have it shipped anywhere in the world (Newark to Hong Kong for a 40 footer was about $500 a year or two ago), then on-site you remove the roof, raise the tiny house up so it's resting on top of the walls, then use the container roof as a deck on a couple of extra pillars. Your house would have 9-10 feet of flood protection and you'd have a lot of storage space in the container underneath the house, even room for a garage, I think. And you wouldn't be surrounded by hot metal.

I'll bet somebody's done this before.
Just bear in mind that standard ISO shipping containers are stacked umpteen high in and on container ships, and they absolutely require all the strength of their corner castings and walls/floor/roof to do this. Chopping big holes in the roof may make that container unable to be shipped with anything else stacked on top of it, and that would preclude it being treated as standard cargo, resulting in higher (much higher) freight charges. It's a great idea though, a sort of origami Transformers container! Realistically, if I were to consider a container for a home, I would use a 40 ft Hi-Cube (9' 6" high) reefer that's already insulated - heck, you've even got a built-in A/C. Earthquake-proof, fire-proof, termite-proof, tough as nails - what's not to like?

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Old 05-23-2020, 01:06 PM   #28
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Here you go! If you "hire some local guides"
Maybe you can just drive through the Darian Gap...

(P.S. this bad boy also answers the question of what to bring to your earlier post apocalypse Skoolie jamboree!)

https://hips.hearstapps.com/hmg-prod...h&resize=980:*
(Inkas Riot Control Vehicle)
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Old 05-27-2020, 03:57 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Ronnie View Post
Look up "The Nomadic Movement" on youtube they have been in south America( from America) for a while now, and just bought a piece of land in Panama
The never actually made it to South America because of the cost to get a 'roll on' vehicle past the Darien Gap. To ship across in a shipping container (most van conversions can do) is about $1-2k. To 'roll on' with a shorty would be about $10k.
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Old 05-27-2020, 03:58 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by Biscuitsjam View Post
It sounds like one of the biggest obstacles is the expense of the Darien Gap in Panama. Shipping a bus costs somewhere between $1200 and $10,000, depending on which source you believe.
I think shipping containers are the $1,200 figure and driving your vehicle on the ship (which would be required for a shorty) costs about $10k.
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Old 05-27-2020, 04:09 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Skiatomic20 View Post
I think shipping containers are the $1,200 figure and driving your vehicle on the ship (which would be required for a shorty) costs about $10k.
I got a quote of just under $6k, but you'd also need to buy plane tickets at about $150/person, and you'd want to strip the bus of anything valuable to send in a shipping container for another $500+.
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Old 05-27-2020, 04:51 PM   #32
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My family and I (wife, son and three daughters) left from Columbus Ohio in a skoolie (Twice) travels across the US and through Tijuana all the way to panama (both times) 1st time on way back we sold the bus to an NGO in Ometepe, nicaragua as a mobile medical office because we were in a hurry to get back to US. Second time we shipped the bus from continent to continent and 2nd bus belongs to another NGO in Africa. Working on 3rd bus for Europe. Neither time did we have any trouble in Latin America, diesel was plentiful and very cheap, roads are just like in US, BUT... look out for the topas which are speed bumps they are TALL! and come up surprisingly fast out of nowhere, had oil changes done and some welding on rear rack holding tools etc. and very professional services, great little mom and pop food places, found McDonald’s has cheese pies in Mexico (very tasty) get used to seeing men in the cities carrying machetes (it’s how they cut grass, no lawn mowers) the local cops were a bit of a pain (five $25 bribes that trip) threatened to tow my bus once, told them to ******* bring the tow truck then and we ended up talking over Cookes and burgers on the grille and all was good. Federal police were awesome, military was awesome. School buses are all over, parts are plentiful, and this was all through Latin and South America. BUT.... this was also before Trump, so I don’t know the climate at the moment, but what I did find was most realized we were Americans but were able to separate us from being American government. Most interesting things were that we as Americans have lost a lot of hands on blue collar skills almost everybody i has a business operating out of their house. Ohhh and to answer one question that you had, not East to pull over and park to sight see, you have mere seconds as you are driving to see if you can make it in a lot, if there is parking, can you turn around etc.
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Old 05-27-2020, 05:04 PM   #33
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Apologize for the misspellings in previous post, to continue after reading some of the replies, my wife’s mom came to see us in Cali before we went to Mexico all in tears as she was convinced we were going to be killed and out there blond haired blue eyed girls were going to be sold into prostitution. Instead we found a very respectful country of people. In Guatemala we were hopelessly lost at 9pm at night and I saw a home with lights on and went on asked directions, they said no directions until the next day and stopped eating dinner, got in their car and took up to a trucker motel got our bus in a fenced area negotiated a rate for us and meet us for breakfast the next day and led us out of the city. Yes, like in the US there are areas you don’t go into but don’t assume the worst because of 2nd/3rd hand stories. This skoolie is going all electric (that’s my business) and we are shipping to Africa and traveling through to Russia then back home via shipping to Alaska where we live.
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Old 05-27-2020, 05:07 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Biscuitsjam View Post
It sounds like one of the biggest obstacles is the expense of the Darien Gap in Panama. Shipping a bus costs somewhere between $1200 and $10,000, depending on which source you believe.

You would need a RoRo from Panama to Columbia. I have seen people in VW vans and compact SUV's pay $2000-$3000USD for the trip. I think you could end up on the higher end of Bj's numbers.

I know folks who have made the trip. One of them is back in Honduras now and laughs at US news stories. Another couple I know were on an extended stay in Guatemala when Covid hit. The picture that they paint of the situation in Central America is very different than what I hear on US news.

I have driven cars & RV's in Mexico and spent time in Central America. I would make the trip in a bus.

I am not sure how far South he has gone but MexicoWanderer over on RV.net travels parts South in a converted Crown.

One requirement.... You MUST share your travels with us as you go
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Old 05-27-2020, 05:12 PM   #35
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Don't forget, once you are done, you have to bring the bus back......
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Old 05-27-2020, 07:05 PM   #36
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jax did I was at aaa bus talking to toney the otherv day and said he got a call in the midell of the night fron jax someware in s America needed advice had motor problum
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Old 05-27-2020, 09:28 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Musicforge View Post
My family and I (wife, son and three daughters) left from Columbus Ohio in a skoolie (Twice) travels across the US and through Tijuana all the way to panama (both times) 1st time on way back we sold the bus to an NGO in Ometepe, nicaragua as a mobile medical office because we were in a hurry to get back to US. Second time we shipped the bus from continent to continent and 2nd bus belongs to another NGO in Africa. Working on 3rd bus for Europe
Sounds absolutely fascinating.

So,

1st trip was Columbus, OH to Panama, back to Nicaragua and flew back (selling bus)

2nd trip was from Columbus, OH to Panama. Did you drive back? If the bus is in Africa, did you go there too? Or just sell the bus to an NGO and stick it on a ship for them to pick up on the other end?

3rd trip is being planned. Build the bus in the U.S. (Alaska?), ship to Africa (somewhere between in North Africa?). I'm assuming that you plan to cross the Suez canal and go through the Middle East before travelling through Russia and possibly some of Europe before shipping back to the U.S. That's four continents in one trip. If you hit Panama again, you'd be at five... Australia is likely possible for enough $$$, but Antarctica sounds impossible.

Sounds like you could write a best-selling book out of this. How old are the kids?
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Old 05-28-2020, 12:06 PM   #38
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The first trip was just to do it, to enjoy the trip and show the kids a different world, the girls were 10, 12, 14 and my son was 17. The second time it was just my wife and I looking at different places to retire to. We shipped from Panama to Columbia and did a three month tour of South America and we have a friend who is an official in Isiolo country Kenya who knew we were doing this trip and the conversation turned to what were we doing with the bus now and long story short it was shipped to our friend,, end of that story. This bus we were talking about electric and the feasibility of making it full electric and while I am still doing all of the calcs, I can probably affordably relatively speaking ($60k +/) get about 150 miles a day on near flat ground here in the US at our speeds And maybe 80 miles if I have things like the California grapevine once in a while. We are thinking of doing a documentary type thing on it and since it will be our retirement home it will be all over the world.
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Old 05-28-2020, 12:08 PM   #39
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I've nothing to add other than I'd love to get in my bus and end up in Uruguay right now.
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Old 05-29-2020, 10:11 AM   #40
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I guess it depends on an exact country in South America. I was planing to visit Panama this summer but situation with my work is not very clear for the nearest several months plus I need to make my mind if I am going to put my property in Larnaca for sale eventually.
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