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Old 08-24-2017, 07:11 AM   #1
Skoolie
 
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Bus Checklists for Driving and Maintenance

So I've been thinking about driving and maintenance things with the bus. I figured when I have the bus I would have two checklists, (at least, but in context of this thread... 2) one for before I get on the move and drive, and one for basic maintenance. I figured they'd go something like this:

Checklist before driving:
-pack camp (gather camp items, take down bus skirt, remove obstacles, etc.)

I dunno where to go from there...

Checklist of basic maintenance:
-check and change oil as needed
-keep gas/diesel tank full enough
-check tires
-check engine/transmission

I dunno what else to add... Also, how often do you think I should do such things? Monthly?

I was wondering if the forum could give me their advice on how to flesh out such lists? When I have my bus I want to be a responsible owner, keeping ahead of possible problems and avoiding them, keeping the bus in good mechanical order, and making sure I don't do something stupid like driving off with a bus skirt still on or something... lol!

I plan on keeping the list printed and taped to my dash, and keeping a maintenance record book handy, I basically plan on making a book out of my whole conversion, like a baby book It's gonna be my big baby!!

Any other kinds of checklists you think I should have? Thanks yall!
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Old 08-24-2017, 07:43 AM   #2
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Mechanically, before every trip...
Check tires (pressure and wear)
Check fluids
Check belts
Check brakes (slack adjustment on air brake)
Start engine... Check compressor is pumping up air
Check all lights
Shut down engine turn key to "on"
Time leak down (I don't have it in front of me how long)
Pump brakes and observe low air warning
Continue to pump brakes till spring break engages.
Start engine.
Observe gauges
Look under bus for any leaks

May be more. While checking the lights, check that all shore connections are secured, all hatches are secure, and area is clear.

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Old 08-24-2017, 07:45 AM   #3
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There is a walk around check list in the cdl driver manual from the DMV (all should be the same) that will give you your daily pretrip and timing on brake tests.

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Old 08-24-2017, 07:52 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Njsurf73 View Post
There is a walk around check list in the cdl driver manual from the DMV (all should be the same) that will give you your daily pretrip and timing on brake tests.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

+1! (I'd give +1000, but I'm only one....)
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Old 08-24-2017, 08:16 AM   #5
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i have a few checklists.
i have an pretrip app on my phone that i can follow around the truck, then it emails me saying everything was fine or lists what ever i fail. the app is called Road check.

i also have a very though camping checklist, this one is on my I pad. RV checklistis very customizable. i can run thru the list and make sure my camper is stocked and ready.
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Old 08-24-2017, 08:24 AM   #6
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Often overlooked or not given a second thought are your hose clamps. Buses and diesel motors have a lot of them which whether you drive it or not tend to loosen up over time. The heating and cooling cycles of metals seems to work the clamps loose as does the vibration from running. If you don't know what condition these are in, you are looking for trouble.
Presently i have 4 diesels too maintain, one a tractor for snowplowing and grass cutting, another grass cutting tractor(gas) and several small lawnmower and generator motors, the bus, and two more Perkins diesels in my boat. And then I have just two gassers to maintain as well in this respect.
I would rather spend the time in my yard tightening these than on the side of the hwy or heaven forbid, dead on the water. It is labour intensive but critical.
Buses are not cars yet people tend to think they can drive them as such and let the maintenance items go. If you do that you should find some other interest in life, imho.

John
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Old 08-24-2017, 09:04 AM   #7
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+1 on hose clamps!! while I dont do them every day I do check them before a long trip. I also look at my belts too.. on my serp belt i mark the tensioner when I replaced the belt and I look to see if it is moving towards the fact of the belt stretching..

at each fuel stop I check my oil, coolant (can see through the bottle), and transmission fluid.

also shoot your hubs with an infrared gun.. when a wheel bearing starts to go you'll notice it getting hotter than the others long before you hear or feel anything..

Hub-oil I check every week or so and before any long trip.. I check my rear fluid monthly.. and visually look for leaks.

others have mentioned many of the other things like tire pressures, air compressor, CDL pre-trip etc stuff..
-Christopher
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Old 08-24-2017, 10:07 AM   #8
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links

nice sheet


Also nice

Daily Pre-Trip Inspection


Daily Pre-Trip Inspection

by R.J. Long

Upon approaching bus, check for anything unusual hanging from under the coach, and for any fresh fluid leaks. Check engine oil, belts and hoses, water level.
Enter coach
Start engine
Check oil pressure gauge and warning light
Check voltage gauge for charging condition
Check air pressure gauge for air build up
Check & adjust mirrors
Check seat adjustment & seat belt
Turn on:
Headlights -- high beam
Emergency flashers
Fast idle switch (if equipped)
Governor cut-out (130 psi. max.)

Exterior Check

Front
Using a Top-to-Bottom, Left-to-Right (TTB-LTR) pattern, check:
Front steps condition
Top clearance lights
Windshield for cracks & cleanliness
Mirror securement
Headlights -- high beam
License plate
Emergency flashers
Wiper blades for condition

Left Side (TTB-LTR)
Front Clearance light and reflector
Left front mirror and mount
Front wheel, tire tread depth (4/32" minimum), oil seal and lug nuts.
Physically check lug nuts for tightness.
Front side turn signal
General appearance -- windows, dents, scratches, lettering
Middle clearance light and reflector (if equipped)
Rear dual tire tread depth (2/32" minimum) and inflation, wheels, oil seals and lug nuts.
Physically check lug nuts for tightness
Rear side turn signal (if equipped)
Rear side clearance light and reflector

Rear (TTB-LTR)
Top clearance lights
Brake lights
Emergency Flashers
License plate & light
Fluid leaks with engine running
Exhaust pipe

Right Side (TTB-LTR)
Rear side clearance light and reflector
Rear dual tire tread depth (2/32" minimum) and inflation, wheels, oil seals and lug nuts.
Physically check lug nuts for tightness
Rear side turn signal (if equipped)
General appearance -- windows, dents, scratches, lettering
Middle clearance light and reflector (if equipped)
Check fuel tank cap
Front tire tread depth (4/32" minimum), wheel, oil seal and lug nuts.
Physically check lug nuts for tightness.
Front side turn signal
Front clearance light and reflector

Re-enter Bus

Interior Check In Driver's Seat:

Turn headlights onto low beam
Turn off emergency flashers
Check parking brake for "On" position
Turn off fast idle (if equipped)
Foot on service brake, place transmission in reverse
Release service brake slowly.
*If bus moves, have brakes inspected/serviced immediately*.
Transmission back in neutral
Fast idle on (if equipped)
Check all gauges
Check wiper operation
Check horn(s)

Exit coach

Check low beam headlamps

Return to driver's seat

Air Brake check:
Governor cut-in (85 psi minimum)
Governor cut-out (130 psi max.)

Static air loss:
Shut off engine, observe air gauge (2 psi/minute max.)
Release parking brake*, observe air gauge (2 psi/minute maximum loss)
Service brake on, observe air gauge (3 psi/minute maximum loss after initial application drop)

Low Air Warning:
Master (ignition) switch ON
Engine OFF
Pump air down, observe air gauge for point at which low air warning light & buzzer comes on (55 - 75 psi.)

Emergency Brake Operation:
Master switch ON, engine OFF, Parking brake OFF.
Pump air down, observe air gauge for point parking brake "pops" on (30 - 45 psi.) (DD3 and spring brakes only)
Start engine, place transmission in Drive, try to move bus. If bus moves, have brakes inspected or serviced immediately.
Push down and hold parking brake knob. Allow bus to roll, release knob. Bus should come to an immediate stop.

Final Checks

Transmission in Neutral
Fast Idle ON (if equipped)
Check all switches for proper operation
Check Emergency equipment:
Fire extinguisher (pressure, seal, date, rating)
Reflectors (3)
Recheck mirror adjustment
Recheck seat adjustment and seat belt
Two service brake stops before leaving yard, or pulling into traffic.

Note:
Be sure to chock wheels before releasing parking brake and leaving driver's seat.

The above pre-trip inspection procedure follows established Federal DOT, California State DMV and DOE guidelines as required by law.

Remember to "CLAP"
An easy way to remember the air brake check is to spell out "CLAP".

C = Compressor: At what psi does the compressor governor cut-in and cut-out?
L = Lines: Are there any leaks in the air lines? (This is the static air loss portion)
A = Alarms: Do the low air pressure warning systems work?
P = Parking: Does the emergency-parking brake work correctly?

Remember to "CLAP" every day before moving your coach!
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Old 08-24-2017, 12:59 PM   #9
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Nice list, Rusty.
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Old 08-24-2017, 01:27 PM   #10
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If my warning light isn't on I'm good to gooooooooo!
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Old 08-24-2017, 03:35 PM   #11
Skoolie
 
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WOW yall! These are fantastic checklists!!! Like holy crap! *taking NOTES*

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Old 08-24-2017, 05:28 PM   #12
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While the above lists are pretty good, as an experienced professional driver, I find that I don't check *every* single item every single day.

Tires - I check these probably the most frequently. It is said that this is the only safety feature on the road that actually touches the road. It's all too easy and common to pick up nails, screws, and whatever else that can make them go flat. Twice daily, minimum (when driving); even parked I'll give 'em a quick kick when I walk by. Who knows if I picked up something to give one a slow leak. I'd rather fix it when I'm not pressed for time.

Lights - checked at least twice per day, once on the pre-trip, once on the post-trip. I also check the ones I can see in the mirrors as I drive.

Oil and other fluids - When I am first assigned a vehicle, I check these a couple times a day. As time goes by and I see the vehicle doesn't use/lose fluids, my checks become less frequent (especially when there are sensors that indicate something is low). Oil I now check about once a week and coolant "as needed" (the truck does lose about a quart of coolant every other week).

Glass, mirrors, bodywork - Since I am the only one that drives the vehicle, I don't find it necessary to do a thorough check every single morning. I'll give stuff a quick glance as I walk around to do the tires, primarily to make sure noone got something during the night.

Gauges, buzzers, and all the other dash related stuff - much like the glass and bodywork, this is something you "learn" as you run the vehicle and get accustomed to what is "normal". While I remain attentive to the various readings while driving, it is also the first sign something isn't right, or the first thing I check when something seems out of place.

Brakes, driveshaft, suspension, and other stuff underneath - I check all this fairly thoroughly when I first get a vehicle. I see how much life is left on the brakes and the adjustment on them (as appropriate). I also check the springs, air bags, driveshaft, rear axle (for leaks) and whatever else I can while under it. I don't crawl underneath that often, maybe once a month (I do a quick visual-from-the-side once or twice a week). On the big truck, I check all this more often, partly because I drive it more, and partly because I don't have to crawl under to check all this.
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Old 08-26-2017, 01:38 PM   #13
Skoolie
 
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True, I didn't figure I'd check all these every single day, but at first I would, to work my way into the learning curve. Then adjust as needed after. This is great you guys, thanks so much, I feel better prepared having these checklists, gives me a better idea what kind of maintenance I'm in for!
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Old 08-26-2017, 02:15 PM   #14
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I have a much longer checklist for my boat... But arguably the stakes are much higher on a boat.

I look at my tires any time I walk past them. It's not accurate to the PSI but if one looks notably different I can grab my gauge and check it. I do a light check on occasion (Just did one yesterday), and I watch my oil/temp/volt meters closely while driving. I've also spent a lifetime of operating marginal vehicles so I have a good feel for "something isn't right"....
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Old 09-12-2018, 05:09 PM   #15
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I was just looking for something like this now that things are getting cooler in Arizona and I'll be taking my bus out after its summer slumber.

Good stuff. Thanks to all who have contributed.



Oh yeah: BUMP!
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Old 09-12-2018, 05:32 PM   #16
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"marginal vehicles" ....
Screen name "Brokedown"

Perfect.
Right there with ya!
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokedown View Post
I have a much longer checklist for my boat... But arguably the stakes are much higher on a boat.

I look at my tires any time I walk past them. It's not accurate to the PSI but if one looks notably different I can grab my gauge and check it. I do a light check on occasion (Just did one yesterday), and I watch my oil/temp/volt meters closely while driving. I've also spent a lifetime of operating marginal vehicles so I have a good feel for "something isn't right"....
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