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Old 09-03-2020, 04:55 PM   #1
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Bus safety

What do you keep on your bus to improve safety. I'll start a list and you can add whatever I missed. I assume you will have food and water.

solar/crank/USB chargeable weather radio with built in flashlight and USB charge ports - Great for when you are outside the bus or the bus is off. It's portable.

CB radio and hand held CB for chase vehicles and fellow travelers(or hand held 2 way radios if you don't want a CB)

flashlight

fire extinguisher

first aid kit(include benadryl for bee stings and allergies)

flare gun

personal defense items (suited to your tastes, abilities, and the law)

roadside reflectors, flares, reflective vest

wheel chocks
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Old 09-03-2020, 05:52 PM   #2
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I have jumper cables, first aid kit, 2 5 lb fire extuingishers, various tools, flashlights, triangles, oil, trans fluid, coolant, hose clamps, gorilla tape, flex tape, fuses, wiring terminal kit, spare belts, I probably should get some LED lighted triangles or arrows in case I break down wit ha completely failed electrical system. when I caravan with the group of friends who have been enjoying soclally-distanced roadtripping before it was the 'in-thing'. 4 of us and 4 busses!! we have 2 way radios and travel with our school-strobe lights turned on if we are on dark narrow roads so we can keep track of each other..



another thing is dont disable or remove your School-strobe.. it can be used as a safety light if you should break down in or near moving lanes of traffic at night.. or are travelling much slower than the traffic-flow in dark or inclement weather.. I have never been stopped by law enforcement for having it illuminated in foul conditions..


im not talking about the yellow and red school flashers.. those are illegal to use.. but the rooftop strobe light that some busses have (others dont)..

-Christopher
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Old 09-03-2020, 07:45 PM   #3
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Bus safety

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texan View Post
What do you keep on your bus to improve safety. I'll start a list and you can add whatever I missed. I assume you will have food and water.

solar/crank/USB chargeable weather radio with built in flashlight and USB charge ports - Great for when you are outside the bus or the bus is off. It's portable.

CB radio and hand held CB for chase vehicles and fellow travelers(or hand held 2 way radios if you don't want a CB)

flashlight

fire extinguisher

first aid kit(include benadryl for bee stings and allergies)

flare gun

personal defense items (suited to your tastes, abilities, and the law)

roadside reflectors, flares, reflective vest

wheel chocks

This will be an interesting thread. I’m taking notes on this.

Flair gun. My brother tells me I should have a flair gun on board for self defense. He says he’s seen them used while sailing off the coast of South America. “People really freak out when you start shooting fire at em”.

I’m like ....Ok dood! I’ll keep it in mind.

I’m also an offshore boater. We have what is called a ditch bag. Its everything you want when you bail out. I’m been putting together a hike bag to be used whether the hike is a voluntary outing or you get stranded somewhere and have to walk.

Here’s what I got:
Water
Energy bar/munchies
First aid kit.
Compass (and know how to use it)
LifeStraw
Fire starter
Solar phone charger.
Sonik whistle /air horn/ noise maker

Think of this post as a subset, not a hijack.

Peace
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Old 09-05-2020, 03:01 AM   #4
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It is a great addition to the thread, in my opinion.


I had not thought of a "ready bag". Making that a backpack is a great way to do it!
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Old 09-05-2020, 11:37 AM   #5
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Lots of those items in my "Bugout bag", kept in the bus.
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Old 09-15-2020, 04:33 PM   #6
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This one probably deserves it's own topic: A maintenance note book. As you work on your bus, take notes and keep them for future reference. They are great in general, but they could save your bacon on the road.

Keep oil filter models, oil capacities, oil types for different weather conditions. Same for transmission or any other critical system with fluids or regularly replaced parts. (light bulb part numbers, belt sizes, etc....)

If you repair the brakes or any specific system, keep any written instructions, bolt torque specs, required lubrication.

Wiring changes list. Record all wiring changes made to repurpose wiring in case you ever have to fix a mess you caused or troubleshoot a problem on the road.

Any reference material you can find to include in the book. Wiring schematics, factory service manual, factory service bulletins, etc.....
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Old 09-15-2020, 06:17 PM   #7
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Good CB radio setup for breakdowns in areas with poor cell reception. A GPS unit to give your lat and long. A properly set up unit should be able to transmit at least 2-5 miles or more under good conditions. I recommend Wilson antennas, Midland and Cobra are good, Connex, Galaxy and Uniden are better. Have the radio peaked / tuned, and have the antenna adjusted for proper SWR (Standing Wave Ratio). It may get you out of trouble when nothing else can.

Not sure if police monitor channel 9 anymore, but if you can reach anyone on 19 or another channel, they can get help on the way on your behalf.

Learn proper pre-trip procedures and inspections, and DO them. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, as they say. But it also prevents what can't be cured. Air hoses, tires, ABCD - Abrasions, Bulges, Cuts, Dryrot.

Also, a tip I've mentioned elsewhere, if you're unlucky enough to blow a steer tire while driving, DON'T BRAKE. FLOOR THE ACCELERATOR AND STEER to maintain control, then slowly back out of the throttle until you can safely pull off. Braking with a blown steer tire at speed will likely lock that wheel up, making it dig into the pavement and causing a rollover.

Extra gallon of engine oil, spare quantities of other fluids. A few basic hand tools to reconnnect loose wires, spare bulbs, fuses, etc.

I had a complete electrical system failure on a rig I was driving once at night in a dark area. No lights whatsoever, stalled in the left lane going into a work zone with the right lane closed. Scary stuff. Would definitely be a good idea to get a couple of self-powered yellow emergency caution lights that can be positioned as needed in such an emergency.
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Old 09-15-2020, 06:57 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHEESE_WAGON View Post
Learn proper pre-trip procedures and inspections, and DO them. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, as they say. But it also prevents what can't be cured. Air hoses, tires, ABCD - Abrasions, Bulges, Cuts, Dryrot.
Would you mind doing a short write-up on these procedures? Your pieces are always very helpful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHEESE_WAGON View Post
Also, a tip I've mentioned elsewhere, if you're unlucky enough to blow a steer tire while driving, DON'T BRAKE. FLOOR THE ACCELERATOR AND STEER to maintain control, then slowly back out of the throttle until you can safely pull off. Braking with a blown steer tire at speed will likely lock that wheel up, making it dig into the pavement and causing a rollover.
This is very good to know.
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Old 09-15-2020, 10:05 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by CHEESE_WAGON View Post
Good CB radio setup for breakdowns in areas with poor cell reception. A GPS unit to give your lat and long. A properly set up unit should be able to transmit at least 2-5 miles or more under good conditions. I recommend Wilson antennas, Midland and Cobra are good, Connex, Galaxy and Uniden are better. Have the radio peaked / tuned, and have the antenna adjusted for proper SWR (Standing Wave Ratio). It may get you out of trouble when nothing else can.

Not sure if police monitor channel 9 anymore, but if you can reach anyone on 19 or another channel, they can get help on the way on your behalf.

Learn proper pre-trip procedures and inspections, and DO them. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, as they say. But it also prevents what can't be cured. Air hoses, tires, ABCD - Abrasions, Bulges, Cuts, Dryrot.

Also, a tip I've mentioned elsewhere, if you're unlucky enough to blow a steer tire while driving, DON'T BRAKE. FLOOR THE ACCELERATOR AND STEER to maintain control, then slowly back out of the throttle until you can safely pull off. Braking with a blown steer tire at speed will likely lock that wheel up, making it dig into the pavement and causing a rollover.

Extra gallon of engine oil, spare quantities of other fluids. A few basic hand tools to reconnnect loose wires, spare bulbs, fuses, etc.

I had a complete electrical system failure on a rig I was driving once at night in a dark area. No lights whatsoever, stalled in the left lane going into a work zone with the right lane closed. Scary stuff. Would definitely be a good idea to get a couple of self-powered yellow emergency caution lights that can be positioned as needed in such an emergency.
Best tip ever on the front tire blow out. Thanks Cheese!
Natural reaction is to dive on the brakes when TSHTF, got to be prepared for it and not react the wrong way.
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Old 09-16-2020, 01:26 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CHEESE_WAGON View Post
Also, a tip I've mentioned elsewhere, if you're unlucky enough to blow a steer tire while driving, DON'T BRAKE. FLOOR THE ACCELERATOR AND STEER to maintain control, then slowly back out of the throttle until you can safely pull off. Braking with a blown steer tire at speed will likely lock that wheel up, making it dig into the pavement and causing a rollover.

Quote:
Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
This is very good to know.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oscar1 View Post
Best tip ever on the front tire blow out. Thanks Cheese!
Natural reaction is to dive on the brakes when TSHTF, got to be prepared for it and not react the wrong way.
Quote:
Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by CHEESE_WAGON View Post
Learn proper pre-trip procedures and inspections, and DO them. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, as they say. But it also prevents what can't be cured. Air hoses, tires, ABCD - Abrasions, Bulges, Cuts, Dryrot.
Would you mind doing a short write-up on these procedures? Your pieces are always very helpful.


And here I thought most weren't paying attention... I believe it's been done before, MG, but at your request, I've spent this evening doing just that. It's nearly finished, just going down it to check for anything I might have missed. It's quite long though, unfortunately, there really is no 'SHORT' pre-trip inspection -- if you do it right, it should take about thirty minutes. There's simply too much to cover to insure you test and inspect every relevant component and system. I believe I'll relegate it to its own thread if I can't figure an easy way to simplify it.

You'd be surprised what you find on doing a pre-trip, seriously. But there are things that might not be so obvious on a pre-trip that WILL show up in the way the vehicle drives, if you know how to interpret it. One of my CDL instructors once told me, "The truck will talk to you." I looked at him like he'd lost his mind, but my experience has taught me he was right.

I was assigned a truck once that had a frame bent so badly it literally tap-danced on the steer tires under load at 65 mph. And of course, the company argued with me and swore up and down nothing was wrong with it. Three dealerships tried to fix it, but ultimately did not realize the frame was bent. It took 45 days and about 10,000 miles for me to home in on it, using observations from the truck's behavior at speed and my pre-trip inspections as the symptoms progressed. Basically, the right front tire was only supporting about 15% of the front axle weight, leaving the left front to do about 90% of the steering. The truck literally veered for the median changing lanes to the left, and fought me like hell changing lanes to the right. Now think about taking that puppy through a cloverleaf with 48,000 lbs behind it. After 10,000 miles in *THAT* POS, I *KNOW* I can drive.

I would add here that most skoolies are designed for the exhaust to exit to the rear, some older ones turned 90-degrees at the rear corners. If the engine must be idled for heat, however, I believe re-routing the exhaust to exit at the top of a skoolie would be a good idea to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. However, care must be taken to make sure it is relegated to its own compartment so as not to leak exhaust into the interior, and not exiting near the air intake for a rooftop air conditioner.

Also, here's a trick I developed when I had to keep driving the big rigs in bad weather... I don't recommend traveling in icy conditions, but if you must... Some vehicles will have trouble keeping the windshield and headlights clear of ice in more extreme weather.

Get some good glass cleaner / wipes and clean all your headlights and glass THOROUGHLY. Next, get some Rain-X (I prefer the quick wipes for easier application) and apply it thoroughly over all glass and lights. VOILA! The science here is that the precipitation and slush can't stick to the surfaces long enough to freeze. Just don't let it make you too confident in going too fast for conditions -- a vehicle this heavy, if you lose control in bad weather, you're not getting it back unless you have the proverbial horseshoe where the sun doesn't shine.

Couple other things... Those with air brake systems should drain their supply tanks of moisture regularly, something I discuss in the coming checklist I plan to post. If they don't, the moisture can damage brake chambers and also cause the system to ice internally in cold weather, rendering the brakes inoperative.

Also, don't take anything for granted, folks. Just because nothing was between your wheels, laying under the bus or standing behind the bus when you parked it, doesn't mean that can't change in an instant. Always double-check.

When training for my CDL, I was taught to have my head on a swivel, which means look 15 seconds down the road for following / braking distance (for one second), left mirror for a second, right mirror for a second... rinse, lather, repeat. Always be aware of your surroundings when driving these things because they have blind spots you wouldn't believe, even with the extra mirrors.

I have found that 63 mph is a good highway speed to avoid unnecessary entanglements. No one wants to match speed with you, so it helps to keep idiot drivers away from you, and it helps fuel mileage and wear-and-tear on the brakes as well. I observed 6-9 mpg in rigs that normally got 5-7 with the Billy BigRiggers driving them (heavy loads of 45-55k, no less), and in driving my POV the same way, I have observed 40-50 mpg highway in my Camry (and no, it's not a hybrid -- hybrids only get that 50-60 mpg below 30 mph). If the limit is 45, I do 40. If the limit is 55, I do 50. 60-65, I do 58. If it's 65-70, I do 63. You don't like it, use the passing zones / lane and get yourself a ticket while I drive past, laughing maniacally...

But I digress... Sorry to hijack the thread. People are in a hurry to get nowhere, and then wonder why their MPG sucks.
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Old 09-16-2020, 02:21 AM   #11
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I hope you post a link to your checklist thread here so we all can benefit.
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Old 09-16-2020, 04:11 AM   #12
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I hope you post a link to your checklist thread here so we all can benefit.
https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f9/re...tml#post405938
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Old 09-16-2020, 07:51 AM   #13
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Tools It'll be the same as my semi kit, it's already built and packed In 2 tubs just has to be loaded. 6mm to 32mm end wrenches, 5/16 to 1 1/2 standard end wrenches. 1/2 3/8 and 1/4 drive master socket sets. Screwdrivers prybar pipe wrenches picks multimeter electrical supplies. Full set of slide jaw pliers. Grease gun. Hammers chisels and punches. Set of brake hardware in case you break a spring. Few misc hoses and belts. Wire hose clamps pin and cotter key set.

90wt, antifreeze, engine oil. Good penetrating oil. Good hand cleaner and a roll of paper towels.

I'll probably have my milwaukee impact small and large and a drill with bits. Blocks and a jack.

I'm a tool hound.....that's the same set that bounces to the field with me or if I'm over the road in a truck hauling cattle. With that kit I have a chance at fixing most things except internal engine or transmission while on the road. It fits in 2 brute totes and I feel lost without it lol. Anytime we go more than 2 or 3 hours I'm sure I'll pack it in.

Wife builds the first aid kits from her ER training. Seems like we roll up on a wreck about once every year or 2 so we have a kit in each vehicle..

Good fire extinguisher or 2.....gun or 2....strobes flashlight and faith.
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Old 09-16-2020, 08:01 AM   #14
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And I completely agree on the pretrips. If you have never driven heavy trucks before take the time to get to know the stop and go systems on your vehicle.....once you understand them you can feel when they aren't working right and see potential problems before they happen.

A dot cdl manual goes through pretrips really thoroughly. Good resource for beginners.

My wife rolls her eyes when I walk around the vehicles every time we stop...and feel the wheels and the rear ends when we truck. That one time I caught a front wheel bearing getting hot when we had a full load of cattle on that 10 seconds might have saved my life. Never hurts to check and you can see a lot in a minute.
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Old 09-16-2020, 10:13 PM   #15
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Oh yeah, that's the ticket! Thank you for the link.
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Old 09-18-2020, 02:29 PM   #16
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something i wanted to bring up as ive seen more than one skoolie that has no extra means of egress..



when busses are built they contain front / rear, sometimes middle side doors, emergency hatches , emergency windows..



many people remove most all of these extra exits.. hatches get replaced with AC units, fans or metal, rear door often gets blocked or even taken out of the mix due to a rear "garage" or furniture..


if you turn your bus over on its door side and the engine catches fire how willyou get out? can you crawl over all of your scattered stuff and furniture , unblock your back door and exit before the bus fills with smoke? if its an RE with side exits are you nimble and skinny enough to pull yourself up and out through a side door?


do you have a hammer capable of smashing a windshield within easy reach?


maybe the hatch you cover with a fan you make in a latched or breakaway fashion where you can push the fan out and use it for escape..



if you have 2 hatches and they leak maybe you replace one of them with a new one instead of metal it over.. (a $300 transpec hatch is cheap compared to being in an ICU burn unit for a couple months)..
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Old 09-18-2020, 06:48 PM   #17
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That one time I caught a front wheel bearing getting hot when we had a full load of cattle on that 10 seconds might have saved my life. Never hurts to check and you can see a lot in a minute.
Got a witness...

CK's post got me thinking about something, perhaps for some of us at least, it would be prudent to replace the back glass on either side with escape hatches, and a backup camera dead-center on the roof cap for visibility to the rear. Voila! Problem solved. Keep in mind, however, a typical school bus escape hatch is going to be child-sized, not necessarily an easy fit for an adult, especially for those of us with a few extra pounds.

Alternatively, perhaps a ladder could be stowed away and easily accessible for such emergencies.

I've seen on some of Transcendence's builds that a rear hatch and glass assembly from a junked minivan was grafted into the roof raise. This should be tempered glass, and easily shattered with a ball-peen or some other sort of hammer. So much the better if it pops out slightly as the late model Astros and Safaris did.
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Old 09-18-2020, 06:57 PM   #18
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and think about how your bus would be to navigate if it were on its side..

would your bed fall in front of the rear emergency door if you keep the door?,

would you be able to crawl over what is mounted on the right side of your bus?
if you swap for RV windows, maybe find a couple that are piush-outs where you can open them like emergency exits.



theres lots of ways to improve on the bus design and still have multiple ways out.



no one plans to flip their bus over.. and chances are you likely never will flip your bus over.. and even less chance that it would catch on fire should you flip it over.. just something to keep in mind..


as well as just plain fire egress.. if you are asleep in your back bedroom and a fire breaks out in your kitchen do you have a way to get outside from your bedroom?
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Old 09-18-2020, 07:08 PM   #19
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I watched a video yesterday of a school bus that went off the road, flipped on its side, and slid into a lake. Rather important to get out asap. The sticks-n-staples motorhome would not have made it to the water instead creating a lot of exits..of course a trailer would have nobody in it needing to get out.
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Old 09-20-2020, 03:44 AM   #20
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im not talking about the yellow and red school flashers.. those are illegal to use.. but the rooftop strobe light that some busses have (others dont)..

-Christopher
We replaced the red lenses with yellow lenses and use them as hazzards.
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