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Old 08-09-2021, 06:56 PM   #1
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Correct Tire Pressure

Hi Folks,
We have a 2000 International, 35feet.
Where can I look up the correct tire pressure.
I know what it says on the tire, but I know that's not the best pressure for it.

Also, do I need a special pump or will the generic gas station air pump do?

Thanks,
Mike

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Old 08-09-2021, 07:03 PM   #2
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On the side of the tire.

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Old 08-09-2021, 07:06 PM   #3
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yeah, that's what I was referring to.
There are recommended pressures for your specific vehicle.
that's what I'm looking for.
but thanks for the suggestion.��
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Old 08-09-2021, 07:07 PM   #4
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No, the recommended pressure is for the tire, regardless of what it's on. I have the same bus, run those pressures.

Gas station pump will do, but it might take 45 minutes, and about $7 in quarters.
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Old 08-09-2021, 07:16 PM   #5
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this is Deb. the tire pressure on the tire is a MAX pressure. RECOMMENDED pressure is vehicle dependent. the same tires used on a shorty are used on a 40' bus and these vehicles weigh different. therefore there is a RECOMMENDED pressure for the vehicle based on THAT vehicle.

much like on a car where the max pressure is probably around 44psi depending on the tire but a car or minivan would have a max psi on the door tag of around 35. you want to inflate the tire as appropriate for the vehicle without exceeding the max pressure for the tire.

thus we are trying to find the proper pressure for our bus.
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Old 08-09-2021, 07:24 PM   #6
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My bus recommends front pressures 5psi higher than the tire max recommended psi. Rears are 15psi less than max tire pressure.

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Old 08-09-2021, 07:34 PM   #7
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Do you have the VIN tag above the drivers seat?
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Old 08-09-2021, 07:39 PM   #8
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Hello Deb
RECOMMENDED pressure is not vehicle dependent, it's load dependent. Pressure less then what is on the tire is considered for comfort. Putting that tire on a five window shorty that weighs 50% less than a 40' bus doesn't mean you can reduce the tire pressure, if it rides rough you change the suspension not the tire pressure. Less than 90psi is considered under inflated.
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Old 08-09-2021, 09:35 PM   #9
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Michael Grumbach

There are charts published by tire builders, they will show minimum pressures recommended for the amount of weight the tire carries.

You have to know, not guess, KNOW what the load is, Then look up pressure chart.

I run below max pressure only because I am seeking a less thumpy ride. I will air down in loose sand, high risk move because of taking the tire off the rim.

Spend the time looking and or go to the truck tire store and get the charts.

Also recommend air pressure monitors. Good ones mount inside the tire and watch heat also. Not cheap.

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Old 08-09-2021, 11:08 PM   #10
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As to the air chuck...you'll find that the automotive air fill station at most truck stops not only uses a lot of quarters...and doesn't usually go above 85 psi...but the chuck itself isn't designed for dually wheel configurations. You need a chuck that has both a straight tip and one angled back at about 45 degrees.

If you drive around the back of the truck stop, where the semi trucks fill up their tanks, you'll find one lane (or sometimes several lanes) which has free high pressure air and the proper chuck on the hose.
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Old 08-10-2021, 09:26 AM   #11
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(I've heard it, both ways. Ha. We use the vehicle.)

Copied from the Brigdestone Tires website:
https://www.bridgestonetire.com/trea...tire-pressure#

CHECK THE MANUFACTURER’S RECOMMENDED PSI
Look on the driver’s side door jamb or your owner’s manual to find the recommended cold tire PSI for your front and rear tires. If you cannot find it, you should consult your vehicle dealer, manufacturer, or a qualified tire professiona
l.
---------


In the instructions written by Bridgestone, the writer never even mentions the side walls of their own product. Reading the full instructions, we are twice directed, to use the vehicle manufacturers recommendation. Even where to find it. I speculate that the sidewall rating is for DOT, not the end user. (Also gives legal dept an exit for defects of form, function, etc.)
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Old 08-12-2021, 09:57 PM   #12
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Thank you everyone for your kind attention. ��
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Old 08-12-2021, 10:26 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by o1marc View Post
My bus recommends front pressures 5psi higher than the tire max recommended psi. Rears are 15psi less than max tire pressure.

Then you have incorrect tires for the bus… the real tire pressure to use is achieved by weighing each axle at the cat scales … then reading the load chart for your specific tires and airing up based on that chart.

Most tire brands have similar load pressure ratings so if the expected pressure is over that of the tire limit buy new tires
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Old 08-13-2021, 03:24 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by o1marc View Post
On the side of the tire.

Quote:
Originally Posted by o1marc View Post
My bus recommends front pressures 5psi higher than the tire max recommended psi. Rears are 15psi less than max tire pressure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeMac View Post
Copied from the Brigdestone Tires website:
https://www.bridgestonetire.com/trea...tire-pressure#

CHECK THE MANUFACTURER’S RECOMMENDED PSI
Look on the driver’s side door jamb or your owner’s manual to find the recommended cold tire PSI for your front and rear tires. If you cannot find it, you should consult your vehicle dealer, manufacturer, or a qualified tire professiona
l.
---------


In the instructions written by Bridgestone, the writer never even mentions the side walls of their own product. Reading the full instructions, we are twice directed, to use the vehicle manufacturers recommendation. Even where to find it. I speculate that the sidewall rating is for DOT, not the end user. (Also gives legal dept an exit for defects of form, function, etc.)
Yep. If you want better slightly gas mileage run them a bit higher than the vehicle rates (but never more than max posted on the tire itself), but you do so at the loss of traction and handling and you get more road vibration. As mentioned, air down just a bit for better traction and less road vibration, but at a fuel-economy loss and a side-to-side sway handling loss, as well as a loss of final drive Horse Power; it's not just more friction on the road, but it takes a lot more energy to deform the tire (the bottom becomes flatter) than when it is hard and round.
Somewheres I think I read recently that tires that deform less (remain round) are going to be required by the DOT to improve fuel economy. Was it the Feds or CA, I don't remember. Higher pressures or stronger sidewalls or both, IDK.
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Old 08-13-2021, 07:43 AM   #15
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I read someplace.. now i cant find it.. that pumping tires up way over the vehicle's tag rated pressures didnt end up maming much MPG difference.. bicyclists have played that game.. maybe it was studies done on tour de france participants and their tire pressures.. 120 PSI in a bicycle tire is somewhat commonplace.. "harder the tires the easier to pedal".. which ended up not being the case.. at a certain point there is no gain.. but the losses incurred in traction and ride quality (read that as control also) were much worse than any gains in resistance..



ever hit an uneven bridge joint diagonally with your bus tires at 115 PSI (common max on sidewalls of many)? yeah better hope you have a nice grip on that wheel.. Bump steer is real and its moreso with higher PSI.
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Old 08-13-2021, 03:52 PM   #16
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I agree at a certain point there is no gain, only loss. Where is that point? On a specific tire? Mounted on a specific vehicle? With a specific load?


The tire pressure rating on the VIN tag is "ideal average", IMO. How can it be anything but that? I'm not talking airing up from 30 to 45 PSI or down to 20 for a comfortable ride. Just a bit of marginal difference. Maybe get 1MPH better. That adds up on a cross-country drive, though. I just put 6000 miles on in a month. What if I had saved 0.5MPG? At $3.20/gallon average? I got 9MPG going 70MPH on hills. What if I got 9.5MPG? $2133.33 vs $2021.05. Saved a hundred bucks there! Shoots, that's a good bag of buds! If I could get 10MPG, that would be $1920.


But I really don't know the real gains.



I know my bike tires say something like 50-75 PSI. I can REALLY feel the difference between the two, in how hard it is to pedal. but I don't think much more than 70 would make much of a difference.


My bus' front tire VIN-plate specs are 110PSI if I remember. No, haven't hit that diagonal edge and felt my bus loose control. Did I ever hit an edge like that? IDK, cause I never noticed! Maybe. Maybe not. Then again, any little bump throws the front of my bus in the air, so ..... Really gotta call BlueBird and see if they can get new front shocks to specs. Got Monroe Gas Magnum charged shocks on there now. No other options. The rears have Gabriel shocks that resist in and out movement. But I don't ride back there.


I keep my bus tires at vehicle spec (but that is near max on the front). My cars and trucks I always ran high, sometimes 5PSI or more. So call me crazy. But I live life on the edge quite often.
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Old 08-13-2021, 07:42 PM   #17
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Shock absorbers

Where I am coming from... I have been involved with suspension tuning high performance cars since the middle 1980’s. Cars that take first place and are considered to be low powered by other people.

All the time I have spent, I will choose Bilstein shock absorbers first-if they are made for my application. This means anything from motorcycle to sports cars to off road trucks and even my bus.

Without spending time to really get into a particular vehicle and do up a custom one of a kind shock. I have always found the bilsteins to be able to cope with the suspension.


The race stuff is always custom.
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Old 08-14-2021, 02:00 AM   #18
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Never exceed tire max
Match the tire to the rig based on the LOAD it must carry.


My bus is 31,800 GVWR but is unlikely to exceed 26,000.

I'll stick with the placard recommendation for tire size, load, and pressures (while not exceeding the tire max). I will however, reduce pressure off road and then air back up before hitting the highway.
I can't imagine hitting the road with a rig this big and not having on board inflation capability whether from the rigs air system (it actually came with a fitting to plug in an air hose) or a separate (my planned way) air compressor and tank.
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Old 08-14-2021, 03:28 AM   #19
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Weigh each corner, then look up the recommended pressures in your tire manufacturer's chart of pressures. There really isn't any other way to do this.

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Old 08-14-2021, 06:57 AM   #20
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I’m not sure where the mpg gain roll off is. Like gnome when I play with my bicycle I very much can tell 50 vs 75 but 80-100 I can’t tell. But 80-100 I tell a difference in the rain.. so if my bike tires grip more at 80 than 100 when it comes to wet traction does it mean there’s more friction or does it mean at 100 I’ve re shaped the tire to a point of defeating the water clearing capabilities of the tread?

I’m guessing the placards are created with 100s or more trips and starts and stops and such along with the weight chart of the tires spec at factory.. tires do vary so if my bus came with good year and now I have uniroyal with different tread does that mean the interior plaque is still perfect? I’m guessing not. The load chart for my dev bus would ha e me at 80-85 cold. I noticed the resistance and the bus was a royal pain to drive at 80… rear end squirlyness / sway is an issue on that bus anyway. Well actually it just follows every perceived groove in the rad. It was terrible at 80. I got to 95 and she drives wonderful. At the tire max of 110 I was always locking the rear wheels for moderate swift stops in the rain. So I go 95-100.

It’s Ohio I can’t go more than a day without rain so no chance to really try driving it through a tank of gas to see if mileage changes 95 to 110.

Next time no more wicked off road drive tires though.. they are all I hear
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