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Old 10-26-2017, 01:52 PM   #1
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Paneling material and joints, interior

My wife wants to paint the interior walls and have them look drywall-esque. Any ideas on what to use for paneling? What does everyone else use for paneling aside from tng and bead board etc.?

My thought was to just use plywood but I'm not sure how to finish it and cover the joints in a way that won't crumble while traveling.

Any ideas?

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Old 10-26-2017, 02:00 PM   #2
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I hate it when a joint crumbles!
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Old 10-26-2017, 02:24 PM   #3
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My wife wants to paint the interior walls and have them look drywall-esque. Any ideas on what to use for paneling? What does everyone else use for paneling aside from tng and bead board etc.?

My thought was to just use plywood but I'm not sure how to finish it and cover the joints in a way that won't crumble while traveling.

Any ideas?
Yes, talk her out of real drywall in a RV. It just isn't done.

You can use oak plywood and get a real nice white pickled finish.

oak.jpg

If she HAS to have pure white walls, FRP fiberglass has 2-sides bumpy and smooth.

Shiplap? ala Chip & Joanne?

ship.jpeg

Take her out for Margaritas, then stop at Lowes to show her paneling.
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Old 10-26-2017, 02:39 PM   #4
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Oh yeah, no way I'm attempting drywall. We're on the same page it sounds like. I just can't figure how to fill the seams between panels. Any ideas?

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Old 10-26-2017, 03:55 PM   #5
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Oh yeah, no way I'm attempting drywall. We're on the same page it sounds like. I just can't figure how to fill the seams between panels. Any ideas?

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Where you can't hide the seams, a simple thin strip of oak glued over the joint makes a nice finish. If you can taper the edges, so much the better.
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Old 10-26-2017, 04:03 PM   #6
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Where you can't hide the seams, a simple thin strip of oak glued over the joint makes a nice finish. If you can taper the edges, so much the better.
Yep- don't hide them, ACCENT them w/ battens.

It's not a bug, it's a feature.

these are wide, but, you know.

black-board-and-batten-kitchen-island-makeover-6-2.jpg
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Old 10-26-2017, 06:18 PM   #7
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Good advice above!!

On my last bus I paneled with 1/2" plywood. I tapered the edges slightly, ran a strip of fiberglass tape down the joint and finished it with body filler.

That is one of the few "ooops's" on that bus. Turned out to be a bad idea. Many of the seams cracked.

New bus is getting battens like they described above.
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Old 10-27-2017, 02:36 AM   #8
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Im trying to convince the wife in favor of the batons. In the mean time I stumbled on to this.
http://www.dap.com/dap-products-ph/f...h-and-leveler/
Anybody have experience with it? Any idea if it would hold up in a bus? It's supposed to be flexible and never crack. I wonder...

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Old 10-27-2017, 04:24 AM   #9
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I hate it when a joint crumbles!
Might a good humidor avert that horror..?
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Old 10-27-2017, 04:58 AM   #10
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Might a good humidor avert that horror..?
IDk but an empty cig pack works well.
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Old 10-27-2017, 05:10 AM   #11
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IDk but an empty cig pack works well.
The empty fag pack does have the benefit of being less casually conspicuous, but doesn't address the drying-out problem.
But that's how the cookie crumbles.
We'll explore solutions for crunchy munchy crumblage later.
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Old 10-27-2017, 09:39 AM   #12
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Im trying to convince the wife in favor of the batons. In the mean time I stumbled on to this.
Flexible Floor Patch and Leveler - DAP
Anybody have experience with it? Any idea if it would hold up in a bus? It's supposed to be flexible and never crack. I wonder...

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To be honest, I'd use what they used when they did my bus- BondoGlass to fill the cracks in the floor between sheets. It doesn't mind water.

bondo.jpg
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Old 10-27-2017, 01:33 PM   #13
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To be honest, I'd use what they used when they did my bus- BondoGlass to fill the cracks in the floor between sheets. It doesn't mind water.

Attachment 16935
Hmm and it didn't crack? I'm surprised that anything rigid could survive.

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Old 10-28-2017, 05:04 AM   #14
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Hmm and it didn't crack? I'm surprised that anything rigid could survive.

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Just to clarify, on mine: they used that to fill the small gaps between the sheets of plywood. Mine originally had very short commercial carpet with no padding; It was a bookmobile.

It is super strong and more flexible AND it doesn't absorb water like regular bondo. Get a small can to play with and I guarantee you will find many uses. It shapes and sand not too unlike wood.


Fiberglass Quality without the Extra Work
Bondo Glass Reinforced Filler provides fiberglass-quality repair of small holes and rust-outs (up to Ĺ”) without the need for backing strips, fiberglass mat or fiberglass resin. This reinforced body filler already contains the short, interlocking fiberglass strands, making it twice as strong as standard body filler and also much easier to use during vertical repairs when the filler can drip down the surface and cause extra work. If your repair needs even more strength, it also works well with traditional fiberglass repair materials and tools.

For Auto or Marine
This waterproof filler is ideal for repairing dime size or smaller (up to Ĺ”) rusted-out metal holes and shattered fiberglass body parts. It is compatible with all paint systems for cars and boats.



reviewer tip:

This worked perfect for patching my boat hull. Some people may find it to be a little thinner than some of the others on the market. To them, I say, Cut up a little fiberglass from a mat or get some pre-shredded fiberglass and add to this. You can get it to your exact requirements that way.


or...Are you talking about leveling the entire floor of the bus? Like for tile?
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Old 10-28-2017, 08:33 AM   #15
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A woman I worked with was a stage actor and she gave me a great suggestion relating to this.
When they need to build a set and it requires a dry wall look but being mobile and light weight.
The set designer and builders use panels and cover it with a flat fabric.
It is light weight, does not crumble or fracture and gives a warmer feeling for the set.
A spray adhesive even gives it a nice smooth texture and I was impressed when I seen what she was talking about.
Just an idea that I have not tried myself yet.
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Old 10-28-2017, 08:36 AM   #16
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I will second the advantages of the glass filled Bondo. I HATE regular Bondo, but after trying out this formula I was impressed. Also talked to a few real "body men" before trying it and they had the same view. One said "they shouldn't even call this stuff Bondo...it's a whole different animal".
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Old 10-28-2017, 10:45 AM   #17
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Thanks guys! Not a huge fan of Bondo so it's nice to know that this stuff is so well liked. I had no idea that it was out there or so useful. It sounds like the perfect product.

I think I'm going to try either that or the filler I found (depending on pricing) and see if I can avoid batten boards. If there joints fail I can always tack them over top.

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Old 10-28-2017, 04:18 PM   #18
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Thanks guys! Not a huge fan of Bondo so it's nice to know that this stuff is so well liked. I had no idea that it was out there or so useful. It sounds like the perfect product.

I think I'm going to try either that or the filler I found (depending on pricing) and see if I can avoid batten boards. If there joints fail I can always tack them over top.

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Fiberglass body filler is awesome stuff. Lots of suppliers sell it, not just Bondo.
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Old 10-28-2017, 06:36 PM   #19
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A woman I worked with was a stage actor and she gave me a great suggestion relating to this.
When they need to build a set and it requires a dry wall look but being mobile and light weight.
The set designer and builders use panels and cover it with a flat fabric.
It is light weight, does not crumble or fracture and gives a warmer feeling for the set.
A spray adhesive even gives it a nice smooth texture and I was impressed when I seen what she was talking about.
Just an idea that I have not tried myself yet.
This idea needs to be heard, should be it's own Thread (yuk yuk)
Lightweight, cheap, warm, cozy, fun covering without too much fuss.



My bus had large panels of 1/4 brown chip board. They over sized the fabric- light burlappy commercial. They used spray glue on the whole board. I wonder if they held the fabric evenly taught w/ big frame?

chipy.jpg

Then wrapped and stapled blind side. They also made nice bulletin boards w/ particle board, cork layer, fabric.

They ALSO used screw covers that are called Snap Upholstery Buttons that make the screws disappear. You use a snap fitting w/ same fabric.

Screen Shot 2017-10-28 at 6.33.14 PM.png

Accent your screws. Giggity.

accent.jpg


snap stud

snapstud.jpg
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Old 10-28-2017, 09:44 PM   #20
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Wow! That's detailed. Thanks guys! This thread is a gold mine.

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