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Old 09-10-2017, 08:54 PM   #21
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so basically you would just use a torque stick to prevent from say twisting off a smaller bolt? but not actually SPEC'ing anything
-Christopher

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Old 09-10-2017, 09:46 PM   #22
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Years ago (and still to this day, in some shops), they'll just put the lugs back on with an impact wrench, torque specs be d***ed! Of course, this has the tendency to warp things, strip threads, and make it all but impossible to remove the wheel next time. In an effort to combat this practice, the torque stick came into use.
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Old 09-10-2017, 09:55 PM   #23
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Using a regulator and the torque control adjustment you can set it without a stick so it wont exceed the spec. Factories use this method to fasten bolt and nuts to a specific torque value
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Old 09-11-2017, 12:37 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmoore6856 View Post
Using a regulator and the torque control adjustment you can set it without a stick so it wont exceed the spec. Factories use this method to fasten bolt and nuts to a specific torque value
While factories do this with tools specifically set up for the job, some shade-tree Joe using his Harbor Freight impact wrench probably won't. That's what torque wrenches are for.
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Old 09-11-2017, 07:45 AM   #25
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Very good info! Thanks. I think I'll keep what I have and look for a good spare rim.

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Old 09-11-2017, 08:54 AM   #26
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If you plan on changing your own dayton wheels are lighter have someone teach you how to align them and safely remove the rear wedges . You can also tighten them up with a 3/4 drive 1-1/4 6 point socket and have someone with a torque wrench check the breakaway torque. You will find out with the correct length breaker bar you can learn how to be consistant and save some bucks on the road. What size are your tires 10r22.5 or 11r22.5 i have a extra rim i think is for the 10 ill measure it when i get back
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Old 09-11-2017, 09:12 AM   #27
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Heck, for posterity let's post that information here:

- Place jack under axle and put some pressure on it, but don't fully lift the wheel.
- Only JUST crack the nuts.
- Jack the wheel up until it is off the ground. Use a good jack stand or cribbing to hold the axle.
- Loosen the nuts so there's about 1/16" between the wedges and the nut. While standing aside give the wedges a couple taps with a hammer. It usually doesn't take much to free them. Without the nut on the stud the wedges can fly off and do some real damage.
- Once ALL the wedges are freely hanging you can loosen off the nuts.
- Now everything is pretty safe. Remove the rim.

There are plenty of youtube videos on how to true the tires when putting them back on. Here's the first result I encountered when searching:
That guy had more problems truing then I ever have.
When truing I usually use whatever is lying around. You don't need something tall either. A can of soup placed on the ground right up against the sidewall does just fine.


Also, page 2 of this document from Webb shows the tightening sequence and torque for Webb hubs, which are quite common.
http://www.webbwheel.com/pdfs/litera...R6_Webb_Torque
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