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Old 09-09-2019, 06:15 PM   #81
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Originally Posted by musigenesis View Post
What kind of monster takes a single bite out of a Reeses cup and then sets it down?



lol when its 100 outside it takes one bit for it to melt till it needs to be chilled again!..
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Old 09-09-2019, 07:20 PM   #82
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Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
lol when its 100 outside it takes one bit for it to melt till it needs to be chilled again!..
It was 100 here in Ga. today, 97 at me.
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Old 03-14-2020, 08:05 AM   #83
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Originally Posted by Johnny Mullet View Post
I could not agree more! This also goes for bus heaters.
I know this is a old thread...
In our first bus, we camped on the north shore of lake Superior in August, 1997 I think.
Ended up buying a electric space heater. When the sun went down we nearly froze.
On another trip in early spring we went to the Mississippi gulf coast, cold and wet weather all the way down. I regretted taking the bus heaters out on that trip as well.
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Old 05-29-2020, 02:42 PM   #84
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im bumping this thread just for kicks..



its late spring and im starting to get the usual PM's on here and on facebook.. "Help I took out my factory A/C and now im sweating"....



its not even june 1 and we have had 3 days near 90f with humidity in columbus ohio... and Ahhhhh!! that 75,000 BTU of ice cold A/C has sure felt good in my DEV bus out on the hot freeways... alas has the 50,000 in my red Bus.. and both busses to handle the brunt of summer really need a few BTU more to keep it nice N cold.. so just thinbk about these numbers.. that an average full size school bus has over 100,000 BTU of factory A/C.. insulating one really nicely.. (floors, factory ceiling remove and insulate, RV windows and sidewalls.. re-sealing the engine compartment).. you can probably get away with half that and still be nice n cool on the hot road.. but dont expect that minisplit or camper A/C to keep it nice N cold on a hot sultry humid day going down the interstate.. .



just for kicks I tried my 12,000 BTU fancy portable A/C in my superior (42 year old bus).. I wrapped the clear shower curtains into a nice cab for me.. yeah I hardly felt more than just some cool air blowing on me.. and my portable is a 2 hose inverter style.. definitely not a way I would want to road-trip across the country...



im not saying dont yank out the air-conditioner? im just saying really think about it before you do it.. oh and if you do decide you dont want it and are near ohio? I'll gladly come and take the air conditioner pieces off your hands.. I have plenty of busses to Air-condition...
-Christopher
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Old 05-30-2020, 01:42 AM   #85
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Itís nice to have that factory AC, but what do you do when youíre parked for long periods? Nobody wants to idle their busís main engine all the time and if youíre in a campground youíre not allowed to make that kind of disturbance anyway. If youíre going to have a whole second system of air conditioning in addition to the factory A/C, I think rooftop units might be nice. Instead of cluttering up your interior with more hardware, you could keep it all outside on the roof. Some large motorhomes and fifth wheel campers have what appears to be three rooftop A/C units. The biggest rooftop A/C units Iíve seen for sale put out 15,000 BTUs. Three of those would give you 45,000 BTUs.That would give you just a little over 1/3 of the cooling power of a full factory school bus AC system. I think it might work if your bus was very well insulated and you were parked and plugged into shore power.

And then you start thinking about how youíre going to heat your bus. Maybe if youíre going to keep it in Arizona or Florida in the winter you can get away with some light duty supplemental heaters. Personally, I like to ski, and I think wintering in Colorado is more my cup of tea. Now the factory heating systems are pretty good, but the insulation is nonexistent. I saw something last winter that was instructive. As I was waiting at a light on a Wisconsin winter evening when it was about 8į I saw a school bus filled with kids pull up next to me and I noticed the windows were completely iced over on the interior side of the glass. Yes all those kids breathing inside the bus generates a pretty humid environment and all that moisture was going right to the windows and freezing on the glass. So I took it as a lesson that thereís only so much even the factory heating system can do in the really cold weather. And then weíre back to that question of how are you going to heat your bus when the engine is not running. Again another set of dual systems. Wow the HVAC infrastructure of the bus is getting pretty crowded and complicated now .

I will just say that I tried to heat an uninsulated 40í bus last winter in Wisconsin with a 40,000 BTU residential forced air furnace on propane. It was futile. When it was 10į at night I had to run the furnace pretty much without a break to bring the temperature up to 45į. And now that itís spring (late May) and weíve had our first days with temperatures in the mid to upper 80s, Iím finding that itís over 100į in the bus during the day. Luckily I havenít had to live in the bus so far.

I think the solution that Iím settling on is going to be about 6 inches of foam insulation in the roof and 3 inches in the walls and on the floor, plus the elimination of about 1/3 of my windows. The astute observer will recognize right away that with 6í4Ē of standard headroom It is going to quickly become a bus for short people or I am going to have to raise the roof, or some of the insulation is going to have to be placed outside of the roof structure. I am leaning towards insulating the exterior of the roof, as I think a roof raise is not a job for me. I would construct some ribs with the correct profile for the roof and depth for insulation. Then I would have to skin it over with some kind of sheet goods, probably 20 gauge steel and of course work out some elegant front and rear contoured panels to make an aesthetically pleasing beginning and ending of the roofline.

Anyway what Iíve learned in the six months that I have owned my bus is that insulation, heat loss and solar gain through the windows, and air tightness have to be addressed before HVAC systems can be specíd out.

Of course thereís the other school of thought too. Itís the one where you move your bus with the seasons. For example, a well shaded spot in the high country of Colorado to beat the heat of summer and then wintering down in Arizona or Texas. It might work, but almost certainly itís not always going to work. There are going to be those days when youíre caught out in the hot midday sun or nights where the temperature is dips Into the 20ís, and for that you will have to have to endure more than I am willing to.
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Old 05-30-2020, 05:04 AM   #86
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It doesn’t matter if you are taking short trips or it’s a mainly stationary home.. but I get messages and emails every summer from peeps sweating and can I fix their rooftop AC that “claims to cool 600 soft “ when their bus is 300.

Commercial motorhomes are designed with front dashboard AC usually 25,000 or more btu to cool just the front driver area.. cutaway van motorhomes have 12,000. It’s expected for you to run the generator to cool the living space in the back if people are using it. This works because that space is insulated better and away from the hot windshield( and engine in a front or CE style).

The cooling loss comes from the driving. Your bus is essentially In a windstorm as it traverses the highway. Air leaks from cracks, seals, windows etc are taking in outside heat and sending your cool air outside. Not to mention zero shade and road heat from concrete and other vehicles ..

There are a lot of conversions built that don’t get hyper insulated. Lots of them keep the factory sidewalks and bus windows / bus door. This model works for many as they may not camp in winter. And may park the bus in shady camp areas for their summer trips.. when parked in shade 2 rooftops will make a bus nice n cool on even hot days.. at night you likely only need one.

Driving is a different story.. and many drive lots bs driving a little. This is wherr were keeping at least one of the factory units makes sense.. no not for living but for driving. Making it your only AC is not the idea..

The pints in this thread are that sq ft capacity ratings on the box of AC units don’t apply to a driving bus. It’s closer if you are one who has gutted and spray foamed and built with high quality RV windows.. even stilll you’ll need a few to cool your driving bus. Even minisplit s which will run at 10-20% above rated capacity in turbo mode struggle to cool a moving bus..
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