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Old 04-20-2024, 06:00 PM   #1
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Tire blew up - what should I do?

Hey y'all, been a while since I posted here. Last week on my weekly drive, my back passenger inner tire blew out on me seemingly spontaneously. I say seemingly as I can't figure out what caused it. I didn't hit any hazards, and looking back at my dashcam footage there wasn't anything on the road. The explosion ended up damaging my wheelwell, mud flap, and broke the exhaust pipe in half (although I'm not sure if it was the chicken or the egg...) Luckily this happened very close to home so I was able to limp back without any more issues.


Anyway, now I'm looking for a replacement, but I'm not sure what to do. I kinda need to save money right now so I was hoping to just buy one tire, but I'm worried that a new tread on one will cause many issues with the rest. They're not bald, but you can definitely tell the difference from a new tire. Should I just suck it up and get all four rears replaced? Is there a way for me to get a tire shaved down to match the rest? Maybe even replace both inner tires to balance it out?


As for the exhaust pipe, I was told by the previous owner that they had to replace it once or twice in the past, so I'm going to see if I can get it simply welded back on or if I have to replace it again, but that's another story


Thanks y'all!

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Old 04-20-2024, 07:23 PM   #2
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You ask good questions but here is the most important question of them all...How old are your tires? Have you looked at the date code for the tires?

When tires sit for a long time the develop flat spots. also, the suns UV rays dries out the tires causing them to crack. This is probably why your tire blew. this is why you see many rv's having there tires covered by cloth wheel covers.

You just can't look at the tire and say "yeah the treads still got life". There's a bit more to it than that.




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Old 04-20-2024, 08:58 PM   #3
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You could buy new steer tires and roll the best used ones back to drives or a single used replacement drive tire with similar remaining tread.

Inner duals sometimes get neglected for pressure checks and can appear inflated with very low actual air pressure.
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Old 04-21-2024, 06:41 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ewo1 View Post
You ask good questions but here is the most important question of them all...How old are your tires? Have you looked at the date code for the tires?

That's a good point, I completely forgot about that! I'm so used to swapping my truck's tires every few years that age completely slipped my mind.


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Originally Posted by ewo1 View Post
When tires sit for a long time the develop flat spots. also, the suns UV rays dries out the tires causing them to crack. This is probably why your tire blew. this is why you see many rv's having there tires covered by cloth wheel covers.

Good point too, originally I was thinking "but I drive it every week!" but I think the previous owners only used it bimonthly - if that. I'm surprised they lasted this long for me without any issues.


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Originally Posted by La Camioneta View Post
You could buy new steer tires and roll the best used ones back to drives or a single used replacement drive tire with similar remaining tread.

Good idea but unfortunately the steers are almost brand new, the previous owners replaced them right before they sold it to me. The single used drive would've been my next best guess but after Ewo pointed out that these tires are very likely tired (ha!) I might just have to suck it up and replace the full set.


I have a list of work I need on the bus anyway, so it might be good to just get everything over with now even if it hurts financially lol


Thanks for the advice!
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Old 04-21-2024, 01:30 PM   #5
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Replacing the full set is usually the way to go. Save the best one or two for a spare, unless you've got something else to use old tires for. They can make for halfway decent planters if you're into gardening.


And Camioneta is also right that you generally should replace your steer wheels first, and if they're reasonably new already, then roll them into the back for the insides or the outsides. I like to keep the inner wheels using the best tires specifically to prevent the problem that you just experienced. Sure, doing body work sucks if your outer fender gets slapped with a tread-alligator, but I'd rather be working on the outside than having a tire chew up something underneath.
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Old 04-22-2024, 09:15 AM   #6
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A couple things.

1)Tires typically don't blow out for no reason. You had prior damage that manifested, or they had a lot of age, or they were cheap offshore tires that shouldn't have been on there to begin with.

2) Circumference on paired duals has to match. Not even a 1/2" difference. Also has to match tread pattern and make/model. Left side vs right side on the axle can be a little off, and doesn't have to match. But it's preferred to have them equal and matching on the axle.

3) Tire shaving was a thing back in the old days. We got rid of our tire shaver 5+ years ago. It just wasn't used. You might find an old shop that still has one and is willing to do it. But the tire make and tread pattern need to match on duals also.

What you should do depends on what your options actually are.

I wouldn't count on tire shaving, as it's not likely you'll match the old make/model to a new make/model and then find someone to shave it down to match.

Are you running all-positions on all the tires, or steers up front with drives on the back?

Best thing to do is buy 2 new all positions for the front, and then rotate your current steers back to the rear passenger. I always prefer putting the new tires on the front, as that's the most critical axle. If you aren't running all position tires, buy 2 recap drives and put them on the back passenger.

Check the age of the tires, as if they're a decade + old like mine, 4 drive(new or recap) tires might be in your future. If your steers truly are almost brand new, there's no reason you need to buy all 6.
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Old 04-22-2024, 10:39 AM   #7
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After you replace all four rear tires, I suggest buying a good TPMS that will tell you exactly what pressures are in your tires all the time. I use a TireMinder i10 that I'm very happy with: it's one of the few aftermarket TPMS that displays all the tires' readings simultaneously, much better than most TPMSs that only scroll through each tire in turn. Maybe the previous owner drove the bus while the tires were under-inflated, and if he did he would have caused their casings to be weakened from heat buildup and over-flexing.

Tires should be inflated according to their manufacturer's recommended pressure based on load. Truck and bus tires' load/pressure tables are available online.

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Old 04-22-2024, 01:49 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iceni John View Post
After you replace all four rear tires, I suggest buying a good TPMS that will tell you exactly what pressures are in your tires all the time. I use a TireMinder i10 that I'm very happy with: it's one of the few aftermarket TPMS that displays all the tires' readings simultaneously, much better than most TPMSs that only scroll through each tire in turn. Maybe the previous owner drove the bus while the tires were under-inflated, and if he did he would have caused their casings to be weakened from heat buildup and over-flexing.

Tires should be inflated according to their manufacturer's recommended pressure based on load. Truck and bus tires' load/pressure tables are available online.

John

does the i10 display all 6 or just 4?


I got Gnarly "drive" tires on my DEV bus.. and while they are wearing really good.. and will probably age out before I wear them out.. I would rather have all positions... I suppose you get better snow traction with gnarly drive tires but they are Noisy... perhaps its because im driving a basically non converted bus.. if ther wheel wells qwere covered maybe the noise isnt so much.. they have gotten noisier as they age..
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Old 04-24-2024, 10:44 PM   #9
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I replaced my front tires, but left my old rears on. They are starting to crack, but I don't drive very far or fast on them, and won't until the build is done. Likelyhood of both popping is slim, and if one pops I'll get a replacement then. I don't want to buy new rears and have the bus sit for months while I build it out.

Also the bus is the lightest it'll ever be, around 13k lbs. right now.
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Old 04-25-2024, 07:28 PM   #10
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Quote:
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does the i10 display all 6 or just 4?

It displays pressures and/or temperatures for as many tires as have sensors attached, I think up to a maximum of twenty or so! Obviously the readings are updated sequentially, but the latest reading for each tire is displayed until it's updated.

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Old 04-26-2024, 09:22 AM   #11
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Well everyone, I ended up replacing all four. I called the local bus shop, Wolfington, and the very honest guy on the other end basically told me "look, if you go through us, we'll have to upcharge you 30%. Since you're a private owner, I'll give you the name of the company we sublet to so you don't have to pay that." Really stand-up guy, he helped me once before with a different expensive question!
Anyway, they sent me to this place called Custom Bandag and quoted me almost $1800 for a full new set. I asked around, most places wouldn't help me because they either didn't service busses, or they don't service non-fleet busses. The other quotes I got were in the area of $2500, so this was probably my cheapest option locally. Sure, I could've gotten cheaper tires and/or retreads, but I wanted something I won't have to worry about for a long, long time. I ended up taking the offer and took the bus that same day. It only took them an hour!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
Tires typically don't blow out for no reason. You had prior damage that manifested, or they had a lot of age, or they were cheap offshore tires that shouldn't have been on there to begin with.
Yeah, it was probably a mix of age and quality. I couldn't find the DOT stamp on one side and the other was scratched off, but I think it ended with a 10, which would make them over a decade old. These tires were a also a mixed bag. The side that didn't have a blowout had a BFGoodrich on the front, which isn't bad, but the other side had a Hercules, which is a pretty bottom-of-the-barrel brand from what I read. I don't know what brand the blown tire was, but now I have a general idea.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Iceni John View Post
After you replace all four rear tires, I suggest buying a good TPMS that will tell you exactly what pressures are in your tires all the time. I use a TireMinder i10 that I'm very happy with: it's one of the few aftermarket TPMS that displays all the tires' readings simultaneously, much better than most TPMSs that only scroll through each tire in turn.
I appreciate the suggestion, but I think I'll just stick to the old-fashioned pencil gauge for now! I've already spent enough lol, but I'll definitely keep it in mind.


Again, thanks for the suggestions everyone! I'll be posting some damage pictures in my main tread sometime in the near future.
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Old 04-26-2024, 11:25 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Payin_Bills View Post
I called the local bus shop, Wolfington, and the very honest guy on the other end basically told me "look, if you go through us, we'll have to upcharge you 30%. Since you're a private owner, I'll give you the name of the company we sublet to so you don't have to pay that."
Wow, I'm a school bus driver (in a Philly suburb) and our leased buses come from Wolfington. Good to know they at least help out private owners!

Could you PM me the name of the guy you talked to? I may have to end up taking my skoolie to them to replace my rusted bumper, and it would be nice to know I'm talking to a stand-up guy.
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Old 04-27-2024, 12:17 AM   #13
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If a place won't take your bus, put the bus up on stands, and remove the wheels your selves. If you bring the tire/rims by themselves they will usually do them without question.
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Old 04-27-2024, 07:03 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Payin_Bills View Post
Well everyone, I ended up replacing all four. I called the local bus shop, Wolfington, and the very honest guy on the other end basically told me "look, if you go through us, we'll have to upcharge you 30%. Since you're a private owner, I'll give you the name of the company we sublet to so you don't have to pay that." Really stand-up guy, he helped me once before with a different expensive question!
Anyway, they sent me to this place called Custom Bandag and quoted me almost $1800 for a full new set. I asked around, most places wouldn't help me because they either didn't service busses, or they don't service non-fleet busses. The other quotes I got were in the area of $2500, so this was probably my cheapest option locally. Sure, I could've gotten cheaper tires and/or retreads, but I wanted something I won't have to worry about for a long, long time. I ended up taking the offer and took the bus that same day. It only took them an hour!


Yeah, it was probably a mix of age and quality. I couldn't find the DOT stamp on one side and the other was scratched off, but I think it ended with a 10, which would make them over a decade old. These tires were a also a mixed bag. The side that didn't have a blowout had a BFGoodrich on the front, which isn't bad, but the other side had a Hercules, which is a pretty bottom-of-the-barrel brand from what I read. I don't know what brand the blown tire was, but now I have a general idea.



I appreciate the suggestion, but I think I'll just stick to the old-fashioned pencil gauge for now! I've already spent enough lol, but I'll definitely keep it in mind.


Again, thanks for the suggestions everyone! I'll be posting some damage pictures in my main tread sometime in the near future.



thats awesome thje tire shop did that for you.. BestDrive tires in Grove city ohio does that for me too with my busses.. runs them through as a cash sale for one of their major accounts.. it looks good for all involved when a shop does that.. the salesperson gets credit for more tires on their regular customer, the large account shows more volume, and you get tires at a good price. from what I understand tire manufacturers themselves discount tires sold to national accounts(to keep that customer buying the brand) so the tire shop really doesnt eat it in the shorts as much as one might think for running a small customer through a large account...
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Old 04-27-2024, 11:11 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
thats awesome thje tire shop did that for you.. BestDrive tires in Grove city ohio does that for me too with my busses.. runs them through as a cash sale for one of their major accounts.. it looks good for all involved when a shop does that.. the salesperson gets credit for more tires on their regular customer, the large account shows more volume, and you get tires at a good price. from what I understand tire manufacturers themselves discount tires sold to national accounts(to keep that customer buying the brand) so the tire shop really doesnt eat it in the shorts as much as one might think for running a small customer through a large account...
I remember when I worked for a telecom construction company the tire guy telling me that his cost per tire selling to everyone else was more than our out the door cost due to the Firestone utility pricing my company had.
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