Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-10-2017, 04:14 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
86Prevost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 19
Trying to fill the void

Need some advice. The way we framed up my charter (2x4 stud) there's a 9 1/2" void from the original bus wall to the face of the stud. Want to put in batt insulation (r32) but worried about the insulation sloughing down with movement and with lack of backing. Any ideas of how to make it work?

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
86Prevost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2017, 04:41 PM   #2
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Kansas
Posts: 224
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Thomas
Engine: 8.3 Cummins, 643
Can you put some pictures up of what your dealing with.
Jacob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2017, 04:44 PM   #3
Mini-Skoolie
 
86Prevost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 19
I sure can but won't be today. Stepped away from the project for the weekend

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
86Prevost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2017, 09:44 PM   #4
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 26
Year: 1999
Coachwork: International/AmTran
Chassis: 3000 RE
Engine: 7.3 T444E
Rated Cap: 40 Passenger
A picture would be great, but without seeing it I would suggest running 2 x 4 cross bracing horizontally. You can then attach your insulation without it slipping down.
Summ1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2017, 10:05 PM   #5
Mini-Skoolie
 
86Prevost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 19
I actually had an idea similar to that but ran across 2 issues. The first being a drill or air hammer would not fit in the space behind the studs if I tried to attach a 2x4 backing plate. (Would have a 4" gap to try to maneuver in) and secondly if I somehow did accomplish putting plates in there would still be a 4" void between back of stud backing plate and the interior wall of the bus. The reason we studded away from the wall instead of tight to it is because the original heating system from the bus runs there and instead of remove it we figured we'd kick the studs out instead. In hindsight, dumbest idea ever, but hey that's how hindsight works

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
86Prevost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 03:09 PM   #6
Mini-Skoolie
 
86Prevost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Summ1 View Post
A picture would be great, but without seeing it I would suggest running 2 x 4 cross bracing horizontally. You can then attach your insulation without it slipping down.
Here's a pic of what I was talking about.

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
86Prevost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 03:58 PM   #7
Traveling
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Midwest
Posts: 2,573
Year: 2003
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: TC2000
Engine: 5.9L Cummins
Rated Cap: '00
Quote:
Originally Posted by 86Prevost View Post
Here's a pic of what I was talking about.
that is a ton of space to loose. Could the wall go above the lines? Susbended by a pice of angle on the floor?

like this
Attached Images
File Type: jpg wall.jpg (16.3 KB, 11 views)
Rusty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 04:16 PM   #8
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Picton,Ont, Can.
Posts: 1,917
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: GMC
Engine: Cat 3116
Rated Cap: 72
I saw your post earlier and then got distracted but this sounded like a real challenge. I think it depends on the insulation type you use.
My thinking was to use batts and fill the void up. Then take an old air mattress or something like that and put it in between the batts, inflate and that should stop any sagging.You might want to leave a small area to get at the valve to check pressure or reinflate.
There is more than one way to skin a cat but this seemed easier than any others I thought of.

John
__________________
Question everything!
BlackJohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 04:18 PM   #9
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Kansas
Posts: 224
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Thomas
Engine: 8.3 Cummins, 643
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
that is a ton of space to loose. Could the wall go above the lines? Susbended by a pice of angle on the floor?

like this
What rusty said, you are giving up a lot of square feet in the width which is way more important...

If your wanting to leave the wall I would try to avoid batt insulation It tends to hold moisture and get funky/promote rust. You could probably attach it directly to your walls the same way it is installed in a home with staples and then put your wall covering over that I doubt it would go anywhere.
Jacob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 04:23 PM   #10
Mini-Skoolie
 
86Prevost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 19
I got to thinking last night, what if I used 4" styrofoam block against the bus wall, secured with screws and pl and then laid in my 2x6 r20 insulation in front?

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
86Prevost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 04:24 PM   #11
Bus Nut
 
Jolly Roger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: North carolina
Posts: 651
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Ford
Engine: Detroit 8.2
Rated Cap: 60 bodies
Use 3" rock wool/mineral wool in three layers 9"'s to fill the void.
If your trying to keep the windows then just build a deep window sill/ledge to cover it?
I would still try to leave access at the bottom at a minimum on each end of those hoses cause eventually they are going to give up!
You can hard pipe them now and never worry again,move them underside and have access to them later and that much more room inside?
If you want to keep it as is I would run a rope (not poly) and have access at both ends to pull new lines later. You can put a rope on the old lines as you pull them out but if it comes off while pulling the old lines out you have no security measure? That's why I said add a rope (tied off at both ends ).
Not trying to scare you but those rubber lines will wear and leak.
Not trying to be rude but when they do! Buy your design you won't notice it until either your having a problem with your engine overheating or your floor starts showing sign of water damage. Or you can't keep enough coolant in your engine and can't find the leak until your underside starts rotting out?
If you don't have them at least add some shutoff valves in the system in an accessible place wherever those lines enter a wall or at the drivers heater take off. So when there is a problem you can isolate that section without draining the engine.
These are just my opinion's and thoughts?
Jolly Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 04:26 PM   #12
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2016
Location: Orange County, CA
Posts: 913
Year: 1990
Coachwork: integral
Chassis: Crown Supercoach II (rear engine)
Engine: Detroit 6V92TAC, DDEC 2, Jake brake, Allison HT740
Rated Cap: 37,400 lbs GVWR
You've lost 19 inches of internal width by doing it that way! Framing a bus just like a house is a very inefficient use of space. Every little bit of space saved will make the interior seem as spacious as possible. I spent hours working out how to save just 3/8" on each side when paneling my bus's side walls, i.e. less than one inch of internal width! If you instead use solid walls it will save appreciable space. For example, my three internal spacer walls on each side are only 3/4" thick (1/2" marine plywood faced with 1/8" Celtec on each side), but if I made made them instead with 2 by 4 wood studs and wallboard I would have lost almost one whole foot of internal length! In other words, my 40 foot bus would have shrunk to a 39 foot bus, just because of the inside walls. Every inch, even every fraction of an inch, counts!

John
Iceni John is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 04:30 PM   #13
Mini-Skoolie
 
86Prevost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 19
It definitely wouldn't be cold in the winter or hot in the summer with a combined r value of almost 45

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
86Prevost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 04:36 PM   #14
Mini-Skoolie
 
86Prevost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 19
Yeah hindsight is always 20/20. I wish we would've done it differently in some aspects but then I think about other projects and I'm glad we did it the way we did. It's six of one and a half dozen of the other. In response to the lines, they've since been disconnected and shut off installed. Have other plans to heat the interior so they shouldn't cause me any headaches in the future.

Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk
86Prevost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-14-2017, 06:38 PM   #15
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Kansas
Posts: 224
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Thomas
Engine: 8.3 Cummins, 643
Well you will have a lot less energy in temperature control. I think as long as you don't put something fibrous against the metal walls you will be fine
Jacob is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×