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Old 06-29-2020, 11:23 PM   #1
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What's in your garage?

I tend to be a prepared not paranoid type of person. I know you can't prepare for all emergencies and even having spare tires takes up a lot of room.

I was wondering what types of issues you have had on the road and if you were prepared for them?

Did you have oil and fuses? Coolant and belts? Rope and chains? Is there anything you would recommend having that you didn't know you needed? I am being a spaz?
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Old 06-29-2020, 11:59 PM   #2
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I keep a gallon of oil, a gallon of water, some basic tools, a funnel, and a fuel can in the bus most of the time. Oh, and some fuel additive.
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Old 06-30-2020, 12:24 AM   #3
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I'm not on the road yet and I'm also a mechanic, so my garage is going to be a little bit different. I actually plan on having a large toolbox and a stand-up air compressor in my toolbox.

Will this end up being useful out on the road? Maybe, maybe not?
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Old 06-30-2020, 12:32 AM   #4
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Indeed, fuel additive is a must. We had a batch of bad fuel on our last trip. A little fuel additive cleared it right up.
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Old 06-30-2020, 12:34 AM   #5
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Sam- what is that smell that all the diesel additives give off?
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Old 06-30-2020, 01:07 AM   #6
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I did not notice as it went into the tank and once it was rolling, I did not smell the exhaust 'cause I wanted to get on with the trip. Perhaps next time I will take note. Sorry.
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Old 06-30-2020, 01:16 AM   #7
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Come to think about it ... I am guessing it is some sort of sulphur based compound. The main problems one encounters with "bad fuel" are water in the fuel or microbes/bacteria. The bacteria does not like sulphur and sulphur will absorb water in the fuel. Diesel fuels *used to* have a shelf life upwards of 10 years until the low sulphur content fuels were mandated (to help control acid rain). Now it is 90 days!
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Old 06-30-2020, 07:14 AM   #8
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Come to think about it ... I am guessing it is some sort of sulphur based compound. The main problems one encounters with "bad fuel" are water in the fuel or microbes/bacteria. The bacteria does not like sulphur and sulphur will absorb water in the fuel. Diesel fuels *used to* have a shelf life upwards of 10 years until the low sulphur content fuels were mandated (to help control acid rain). Now it is 90 days!
90 days, huh? I had better get something in my tank then. What's your flavor preference? I don't foresee my rig flying down the road for at least 6 more months, more like 9-12 before it's rolling often enough to not need something in it all the time.
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Old 06-30-2020, 07:43 AM   #9
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Come to think about it ... I am guessing it is some sort of sulphur based compound. The main problems one encounters with "bad fuel" are water in the fuel or microbes/bacteria. The bacteria does not like sulphur and sulphur will absorb water in the fuel. Diesel fuels *used to* have a shelf life upwards of 10 years until the low sulphur content fuels were mandated (to help control acid rain). Now it is 90 days!
I dont' think so. Its not pungent, its got a real odd chemical smell. I can smell diesel additive from 20 feet away as soon as the bottle is opened. I'll only open and pour it with gloves on cause the smell stays on hands for days.
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Old 07-01-2020, 01:42 PM   #10
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90 days, huh? I had better get something in my tank then. What's your flavor preference? I don't foresee my rig flying down the road for at least 6 more months, more like 9-12 before it's rolling often enough to not need something in it all the time.

Here is a good read about storing diesel and what may be done about problems with fuels. Oh, I misread it ... 90 days for gasoline 28 days for diesel.


There are lots of products. Diesel 911 is one. I recently used another product with the same ingredients ... but I do not remember the name. Also, an anti-bacterial is a good thing.
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Old 07-01-2020, 01:57 PM   #11
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Indeed, fuel additive is a must. We had a batch of bad fuel on our last trip. A little fuel additive cleared it right up.
Just so I am clear, it is possible to get bad fuel right from a fuel station?
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Old 07-01-2020, 02:12 PM   #12
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Just so I am clear, it is possible to get bad fuel right from a fuel station?

Buy diesel from a dealer that sells lots of it, like truck stops. Not smaller stations where fuel may sit longer. More contaminants this way at smaller venues.
Each fillup is a gamble though if you don't add algaecide protection in hot climates. Winter fuel is another story where water and fuel gelling can be problems if your bus sits very long. These are not car engines and most think they don't need to pay attention to these matters.
Cheap insurance to stay on top of fuel choices and fuel filter maintenance more regularly than cars.


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Old 07-01-2020, 02:12 PM   #13
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Just so I am clear, it is possible to get bad fuel right from a fuel station?
Absolutely...

The fuel is stored in underground tanks at most service stations.
Through time water and dirt accumulate in the bottom of the storage tanks.
The storage tanks should be serviced just like anything else but...
If the storage tank is low when you get fuel then it starts pulling from the layer of water/crud at the bottom, or if you ever pull into a service station and see the tanker truck filling the storage tank -- that action can stir up the sludge on the bottom of the tank -- I never buy fuel if I see a tanker truck there...

Less likely is a leak in the tank allowing ground water in -- this is very unlikely with better EPA laws and guidelines -- however with the program/enforcement cuts made over the last 3Ĺ years leaky tanks will probably become a problem again...

Above ground tanks are more susceptible to temperature change and condensation issues...
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