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DreamWeaverBus 05-05-2017 08:32 AM

Roof Raisers: Windows?
 
Hey all roof raisers, after you raised the roof, what did you do about windows? Once you raise the roof the old windows won't fit anymore will they? Not unless you added skin below or above...

I guess if you bother raising the roof, and can't use the old windows anymore, getting new ones might be worth it, better insulated ones anyway.

Trying to figure out what I'd do about window ports if I raised my roof. I'd probably skin SOME spaces, but I like some window views. Also I suspect good windows are expensive.

If it came to it, I'd just add skin and frame above or below, add the old windows, and add the heat control tinted window film and privacy film, and make insulated curtain panels that fit in the spaces of the windows for extreme weather.

PNW_Steve 05-05-2017 09:49 AM

I think that you will find that most folks that raise their roof put in RV windows.

I don't know where you are located. There are several RV surplus outfits in Indiana and there are some Ebay sellers with a good selection such as: https://stores.ebay.com/4-star-trader...nkw=rv+windows

These guys are in Oregon.

coach21 05-05-2017 10:10 AM

I put in 7 rv windows after I raised my roof. I bought all mine from a guy that works on rv's and sells spare parts. I bought (2x3 ft roughly) big sliders for about $100 each, and then some that were about 2x2 ft for about $40 each. They have worked great. I found the guy on craiglist. I completely reskinned the opening from raising the roof and then cut the holes for the windows, this way I didn't have to find windows that were exactly a certain size.

Stu & Filo. T 05-05-2017 10:13 AM

I sheet metaled the sides & put in RV windows.

Tango 05-05-2017 10:27 AM

I went with RV windows too. If you can find some that are double pane, tinted and gas filled, they make a really big difference in how much heat goes in...or out.

mysty 05-05-2017 03:01 PM

I'm the oddball here. I really like the light, open feeling of having windows all along the bus, so I am putting (most) of my bus windows back in. I did cover up 5 along the passenger side where my closet, refrigerator, and shower will be.

At the rear of the bus, I put the windows back in at the top of the opening, skinning underneath. This puts them high enough that I can put furniture/counters/backsplash below them and still comfortably look out when standing. At the front of the bus, I put them back down at their original height, which is the bottom of the opening. This allows passengers seated and buckled in to look out the windows while the vehicle is in motion. It also keeps the top of the windows in the front even with the top of the door and the driver's side window. My bunks are right where the transition happens, so that both the top and bottom bunk will have a window.

mysty 05-05-2017 03:04 PM

Side note, I did also put some heat control film on the windows before reinstalling them. I don't pretend like they will ever have the efficiency that a good set of double paned RV windows would have, but I think between traveling with the weather, the heat film, and some good blackout curtains, we'll manage just fine.

slaughridge85 05-05-2017 03:18 PM

I used vinyl residential windows after I re-skinned mine. They look great are cheaper than RV windows and I haven't had any trouble with the double panes going from low to high altitudes or from vibration going down the road.

DreamWeaverBus 05-05-2017 07:13 PM

I was considering residential windows but also thought they might look funny in a bus, RV windows would probably look better. I'll have a look at those, surely we got some round Southern Illinois somewhere..

cadillackid 05-05-2017 07:49 PM

itd be woerth a trip to elkhart indiana to see what you can find.. theres a lot of RV surplus there and you arent that far away..
-Christopher

DreamWeaverBus 05-13-2017 09:38 PM

good point, Indiana aint far away.

But at this point I'm thinking about not doing a roof raise. As long as I have 10 windows length, I should have enough room for all my stuff. I'm thinking about reusing the ceiling metal to cover some windows, at least half or just over, and then create insulated window panel curtains to fit onto the windows when I want it dark or warmer or cooler.

REDUCE, REUSE, RECYCLE!!! CAPTAIN PLANET 4EVA!!!
VELCRO WINDOWS BABY!!! 8-)

North Plains Drifter 05-14-2017 06:54 PM

skin question?
 
Still in the planning stage, my question is: on any given manufacturer whether it be BB, Thomas, ect. Are the interior skins the same gauge thickness as the exterior skins? If so that would save a lot of cost to skin a roof raise would it not?

Thanks

EastCoastCB 05-14-2017 07:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by North Plains Drifter (Post 203569)
Still in the planning stage, my question is: on any given manufacturer whether it be BB, Thomas, ect. Are the interior skins the same gauge thickness as the exterior skins? If so that would save a lot of cost to skin a roof raise would it not?

Thanks

MY interior skins were an ugly textured steel. I didn't check for sure, but they were most likely 18 ga.
A lot of newer buses than my Ward used a perforated steel.

mysty 05-14-2017 09:25 PM

On my Carpenter, the interior ceiling panels were somewhere between 18 and 20 gauge when we measured with calipers. They seemed pretty close to the same thickness as the exterior skin of the bus, and I used them to reskin all but the very front part of the bus (above the windshield). I would've used it there, except my panels weren't wide enough, and I didn't want a patchwork job, so I spent $75 and got a nice sheet of 20 gauge cold rolled steel, which worked just fine for that one panel.

The wall panels were ugly, textured steel like EastCoastCB said, and I am just scrapping those. Luckily, the ceiling provided more than enough material to reskin the back and sides of my bus, including some full walls where I didn't want the windows (behind the fridge, closet, and shower).

Tango 05-14-2017 10:10 PM

Most recent skoolies have exterior skin that is around 16 gauge. Several use metal that is to their own weird specs. BB for example is more like 15 gauge from what I've been told. Not anything you can even buy commercially, but 16 would be close enough.

DreamWeaverBus 06-10-2017 12:33 PM

So last night I was thinking, revisiting the idea of a bedroom loft in my bus. And I wondered if I'd be able to re-use the ceiling panels to simply build a loft on top, along with covering the windows I want to remove. I don't know why I didn't think of that before. Planned all along to use the panels to cover window holes, why not the loft as well?

Also, once I removed the seats I was thinking of breaking them down, scrapping the steel, or if possible reusing it to frame the bedroom loft? And as for the seats, if the seats were covered with decent leather or faux leather, I was wondering if anyone had ever used them to cover the ceiling, like a headliner?

Robin97396 06-10-2017 12:59 PM

Innovative ideas. That's what I like to see.

cadillackid 06-10-2017 01:01 PM

I used a couple of my 4 post seat frames as Battery Cages.. they are Heavy and wit hthe wheelchair seatbelts, hold my Boxed batteries in place..

my bus seats had old yucky vinyl... Green in the carpenter.. the bluebird has nice brown seats that are in good shape but still show alot of wear, so not sure id want to cover my ceiling.. cool idea though if it is in good shape.. SEM to the color you want and go..
-Christopher

DreamWeaverBus 06-10-2017 01:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Robin97396 (Post 208261)
Innovative ideas. That's what I like to see.

Reduce, reuse, recycle! :wink1:
AND save some cash!

DreamWeaverBus 06-10-2017 01:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cadillackid (Post 208263)
I used a couple of my 4 post seat frames as Battery Cages.. they are Heavy and wit hthe wheelchair seatbelts, hold my Boxed batteries in place..

my bus seats had old yucky vinyl... Green in the carpenter.. the bluebird has nice brown seats that are in good shape but still show alot of wear, so not sure id want to cover my ceiling.. cool idea though if it is in good shape.. SEM to the color you want and go..
-Christopher

Sweet! Love reusing materials and saving cash, shame the vinyl was crappy, but yeah if the bus I get has ones in decent shape I thought it might be cool.

But I still want to paint the ceiling, can you paint on vinyl? Wonder what kind would stick? Gonna have glow in the dark paint up there... :tongue:

Robin97396 06-10-2017 06:51 PM

Some years ago I bought some vinyl paint at Fred Meyer's garden center that worked well at changing the color of boat cushions.

You could make a vinyl windshield screen from seat covers.

cadillackid 06-10-2017 06:53 PM

SEM is the paint used to change the color of fabric / vinyl / dashpads, etc.. ive used it for years and it really works
-Christopher

DreamWeaverBus 06-12-2017 02:50 PM

Thanks yall! Just another idea to file away until I get there!

New2Skool 06-12-2017 04:58 PM

I dont know where you are located but, in my climate the bus windows are not good enough. I like the open feeling as well, the loft idea sounds great but not on my bus at least. I have lived in a tiny home with a loft and loved it but, I just dont want it in my bus personally.

I always suggest to people to buy replacement windows. Menards is my locate big box store and I bought 11 windows, 3 were custom made for about $1,200. The most of the cost was in the custom made triple pane high E glaze. It is a little more expense but, the added insulation value is a good long term investment here.

There are standard stock windows in most big box stores, sizes that work well in our buses to fit between ribs and they are decent windows and pretty cheap. Some are $80 and require very little frame work to fit between the ribs. You could buy a dozen nicer newer better constructed and insulated windows for a grand.

Just a thought.

DreamWeaverBus 06-12-2017 05:52 PM

Better windows will probably be part of my later investments on the bus, but not part of the initial conversion I'm doing. I'm in southern Illinois, but when I finish my conversion Minnesota is probably the first place I'm going to. Lived there for a year after college and loved it.

Honestly would love a loft, but it's still in the maybe pile. Better windows definitely later as well, however in the meantime I'll be taking out at least half of them, using spray foam and rigid foam insulation, and using heat control residential window film on the windows, as well as making some kind of velcro attached insulated window panels, homemade, to cover the windows in cold weather. For the meantime that will do. When I have more money to add to my bus later I will get better windows.

Brewerbob 06-13-2017 07:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mysty (Post 201825)
I'm the oddball here. I really like the light, open feeling of having windows all along the bus, so I am putting (most) of my bus windows back in. I did cover up 5 along the passenger side where my closet, refrigerator, and shower will be.

At the rear of the bus, I put the windows back in at the top of the opening, skinning underneath. This puts them high enough that I can put furniture/counters/backsplash below them and still comfortably look out when standing. At the front of the bus, I put them back down at their original height, which is the bottom of the opening. This allows passengers seated and buckled in to look out the windows while the vehicle is in motion. It also keeps the top of the windows in the front even with the top of the door and the driver's side window. My bunks are right where the transition happens, so that both the top and bottom bunk will have a window.

Interesting. Pics? While driving my bus around, I use the windows a LOT. Intersections, backing up, etc. Once cabinets, storage, etc. is added I'm going to be blind!! I haven't raised the roof yet but I am worried about where to put windows back in.

Quote:

Originally Posted by slaughridge85 (Post 201832)
I used vinyl residential windows after I re-skinned mine. They look great are cheaper than RV windows and I haven't had any trouble with the double panes going from low to high altitudes or from vibration going down the road.

I might need to go this route. I don't like the looks of the trim on residential windows but I do like the square corners of the OEM bus windows. Has anyone looked for double paned skoolie windows?

If someone isn't retrofitting window frames they should. I'll sell you the idea for a 5% return of your profits.:biggrin:

Quote:

Originally Posted by North Plains Drifter (Post 203569)
Still in the planning stage, my question is: on any given manufacturer whether it be BB, Thomas, ect. Are the interior skins the same gauge thickness as the exterior skins? If so that would save a lot of cost to skin a roof raise would it not?

Thanks

I only have 1 ceiling panel that doesn't have holes cut in it. Lights, speakers, and e-hatches. I could cover individual windows but for reskinning the bus, I want long sheets to tie all the ribs together. Especially with the ceiling metal removed.

Quote:

Originally Posted by mysty (Post 203606)
The wall panels were ugly, textured steel like EastCoastCB said, and I am just scrapping those.

I kinda like the textured tin look. I'm hoping I'll be able to reuse them here and there as accents, back splash, etc. Maybe around the wood stove?

Quote:

Originally Posted by DreamWeaverBus (Post 208253)
Also, once I removed the seats I was thinking of breaking them down, scrapping the steel, or if possible reusing it to frame the bedroom loft? And as for the seats, if the seats were covered with decent leather or faux leather, I was wondering if anyone had ever used them to cover the ceiling, like a headliner?

Gen-u-wine 100% fake pleather in a nice brown color. You could do a headliner but :puke:

Quote:

Originally Posted by New2Skool (Post 208671)
I dont know where you are located but, in my climate the bus windows are not good enough.

The most of the cost was in the custom made triple pane high E glaze. It is a little more expense but, the added insulation value is a good long term investment here.

The ex-in-laws are in Farmington. I've no idea where Bemidj is but if you're living year round in you bus, I WANT TO TALK TO YOU!!! Let's talk insulation!! I don't want to winter in Alberta but I want to be ABLE to winter in Alberta.

So all of your windows are triple paned or just the custom windows?

cadillackid 06-13-2017 08:13 AM

there are indeed double paned skoolie windows... , theres a Bus Geek that when was in high school posted all his bus rides on youtibe.. he was in alaska and the busses had double paned windows..

my bluebird has a double pane door.. ECCB's shorty has at least the door and driver window.. I want to think his first row seat windows are also doubles.. so they exist..

trouble is theres still a lot of other heat loss in skoolie windows.. just like old metal windows in houses.. im not sure if they were popular where you are but here in Ohio it seemed once the 70s came along wood was out and crappy aluminum (double pane) windows came out.. ice and condensation on the frames and lots of heat loss in the aluminum..

im not a fan of residential windows in ab us though people are using them with some success.. my MAIN beef against them is safety.. a skoolie window is going to shatter like a car window into lots of teeny little bits N pieces... a house window is going to Shard with large pointy, knife-edge type pieces... a rock from a truck wheel just the right way hits the side of the bus and that house window is going to shard right into the cabin.... while side impacts of objects are somewhat rare.. its not a risk im willing to take.. house windows in a bus that spends 80%+ of its time parked and goes on short trips or when its moved no occupants are in back. ..then I think thats perfectly safe and fine...

thats just an opinion of mine...

-Christopher

EastCoastCB 06-13-2017 08:22 AM

Yeah my driver window and first row of passenger windows are double pane.

Brewerbob 06-13-2017 10:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cadillackid (Post 208790)
my bluebird has a double pane door.. ECCB's shorty has at least the door and driver window.. I want to think his first row seat windows are also doubles.. so they exist..

Interesting. Didn't know they existed. Do the FL buses have them? Those (probably '70s and early '80s) were the only buses I rode. North FL but still certainly not cold by any standard.


Quote:

im not a fan of residential windows in ab us though people are using them with some success.. my MAIN beef against them is safety.. a skoolie window is going to shatter like a car window into lots of teeny little bits N pieces...
Good point, forgot about that. I assume the RV windows are safety glass as well as the OEM bus windows?

Brewerbob 06-13-2017 10:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EastCoastCB (Post 208794)
Yeah my driver window and first row of passenger windows are double pane.

What the hell is the point of that??? All or nothing. One row isn't going to make a difference.

cadillackid 06-13-2017 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brewerbob (Post 208817)
What the hell is the point of that??? All or nothing. One row isn't going to make a difference.

defrosting and visibility is the only reason its done.. with double pane its easier for the defrosters to heat up the inside pane of glass enough that condensation wont form.. hence the door , drivers window.. and first set of seats as often those windows are used for lange changes or such..

window clearing is a huge issue for even empty busses in the rain.. and with any people in cold / rain / snow weather the inside of the bus is a fog factory for the windows..

-Christopher

Brewerbob 06-13-2017 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cadillackid (Post 208820)
defrosting and visibility is the only reason its done.. with double pane its easier for the defrosters to heat up the inside pane of glass enough that condensation wont form.. hence the door , drivers window.. and first set of seats as often those windows are used for lange changes or such..

window clearing is a huge issue for even empty busses in the rain.. and with any people in cold / rain / snow weather the inside of the bus is a fog factory for the windows..

Ah ok. Damn sure ain't for heat.

EastCoastCB 06-13-2017 10:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brewerbob (Post 208817)
What the hell is the point of that??? All or nothing. One row isn't going to make a difference.

They're located where most of the heaters are.
Its a cold weather Colorado bus. That one row keeps the driver and the two WC spots warmer.:thumb:

Brewerbob 06-13-2017 11:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EastCoastCB (Post 208827)
They're located where most of the heaters are.
Its a cold weather Colorado bus. That one row keeps the driver and the two WC spots warmer.:thumb:

So I need to find 13 CO buses for double pane windows. 4 of which need double pane 32" windows. Piece of cake.

EastCoastCB 06-13-2017 11:40 AM

They're not that great. The inner rubber seal on all mine are on their way out and looking ragged.

Brewerbob 06-13-2017 12:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EastCoastCB (Post 208834)
They're not that great. The inner rubber seal on all mine are on their way out and looking ragged.

Were they original fancy and gas filled or just two panes of glass?

EastCoastCB 06-13-2017 12:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brewerbob (Post 208842)
Were they original fancy and gas filled or just two panes of glass?

Pretty sure just two panes, Idk though.

cadillackid 06-13-2017 12:23 PM

they are gas filled sealed units similar to house windows.. ive seen the ones in EC's bus.. and they are definitely having issues..
double pane windows even in houses have issues esp where people open and close themn all the time.. after 20 years alot of them will start to leak..

in a bus with wild temp swings and vibration im amazed they last at all
-Christopher

jefferyofsky 07-07-2017 12:44 AM

Noticed the thread, since I am considering a bus project and want to raise the roof, and wondering how people are tackling it. I hope to dig out my welder I did not use yet and give it a try.

However I noticed that some people mentioned house windows. I know that this is supposed to not be done unless tempered, it could really slice you or others up in the case of an accident, normal glass is a mess and is it worth it.

What I have done in my small tiny home build on the back of a pickup, is to use a window from a metal winter door. You can find them in colder climates at Restore for $40, and often free. Just cut out the window, i leave the metal on, but you can take off the plastic and take out the foam around it.

Then you put it in a frame. This is the window I plan on using on my bus project, however this time, I will have a frame within a frame. So I will put the double pain winter door window, which are of course tempered, into a frame, and then that will be hinged, and then put into another frame with a good trim seal. This way, in summer I can flip it out, and put a screen on the inside, so for cost it is a poor mans window, but VERY WARM, I wintered in Edmonton -35C and it was very toasty.

Iheartbus 07-07-2017 08:16 PM

After feeling the heat from my non tinted windows this last month, I'm ditching every last one of em, including the back windows. If I want a view, I'll go outside or on the roof.


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