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farok 02-07-2019 09:40 PM

Five Chime build
 
1 Attachment(s)
I figured I'd start a thread for my bus build, as that's what folks seem to do to keep track of their progress. I've had the bus for a few weeks now, and am well into the demo process (as much as time allows working full time). So far, the seats are out, one of the seatbelt racks above the windows is down (thanks OnTheRoadW/TheLord for the tips!), and the floor is starting to be ripped up.

Tonight I tackled removal of the wheelchair lift, which was a pain, but it's done! I also started to see how bad peeling up the rubber would be. It's not too bad, thankfully. That said, I've elected to leave the L Tracks in the floor, and remove everything else to clean any rust and start over with a new floor. Working around them will be somewhat difficult, but nowhere near as bad as removing the L Tracks, which is proving very difficult, and in my opinion just not worth the effort.

Anyway, here's a picture from tonight's work session. I managed to get the 8 bolts for the lift out without needing to break or cut any of them! Now to just figure out who wants to come get this thing out of the bus...

For reference (mostly mine), some other threads for this bus:
Intro: https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f6/hel...sey-25665.html
Bus Background: https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f27/03...ice-25443.html
Floor Fun: https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f27/co...elp-25649.html
Tentative Floor Plans: https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f27/fl...tie-25559.html
Propane Questions: https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f27/wh...ers-25794.html
Lithium Battery Questions: https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f49/li...ons-25694.html

Chris

farok 02-09-2019 09:22 PM

I've been working on the floor the past few nights. I have the wheelchair lift ready to remove when someone comes to pick it up, and tonight I removed the rear heater. I'm likely not going to reinstall the rear heater. If not is there any value in those?

I also got most of the rubber up and took an initial look at getting the torx 30 screws holding the plywood down to see how ugly that's going to be. Thankfully about 80% seemed to come up on the first sheet I tried. Any tips on getting the others out? The torx 30 bit seems like it's going to strip... The screws are just really tight. Looking for ideas before I try drilling them out as I suspect there may be quite a few like this throughout the rest of the bus.

I suppose I could see how much of the plywood I can get up and just saw off the rest...

Thanks again,
Chris

ChiliChzPoopTart 02-10-2019 07:59 AM

when i pulled up my flooring I just used large prybars and popped the sheets up "through" the screws then sheared them off with an air chisel/ angle grinder.

PNW_Steve 02-10-2019 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChiliChzPoopTart (Post 309884)
when i pulled up my flooring I just used large prybars and popped the sheets up "through" the screws then sheared them off with an air chisel/ angle grinder.

We tried a few different methods and tools.

What worked best for us was pretty much what you described. I found that a 4' pry bar with a claw end was the dream tool for the job.

Keep the updats coming.

farok 02-10-2019 06:22 PM

Sounds good - right now I just have a crowbar, but if that's not good enough, I'll see if someone has a bar like you mention. Didn't get any time in the bus today, and they're calling for snow the next two days, so it may be a little while...

farok 02-19-2019 08:06 PM

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I started pulling up plywood tonight, and wow it's stuck on the floor steel really well. I accidentally put a hole in the sheet steel under it trying to pry up one piece - just another hole that'll have to be patched, I guess. Any tricks for getting up the plywood any easier without potentially damaging the floor below? I don't know if I'm lucky, but the galvanized is in great shape except along the edges so far! I'm hoping to not destroy it while destroying the plywood, which is coming out in splinters so far. If nothing else, I guess a lot of time and elbow grease... I'm not proficient in metalworking, so the less metal repair/replace I need to do, the better. :smile:

Chris

o1marc 02-19-2019 09:15 PM

Take a circular saw and set it to the depth of the ply wood.Run a line from one end to the other just missing the heads of the screws/nail/bolts holding the ply wood down. Lift up the big pieces of ply and pry whats left from the hardware. You're at one of the funnest parts of the build.

farok 02-21-2019 08:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by o1marc (Post 311266)
Take a circular saw and set it to the depth of the ply wood.Run a line from one end to the other just missing the heads of the screws/nail/bolts holding the ply wood down. Lift up the big pieces of ply and pry whats left from the hardware. You're at one of the funnest parts of the build.

Wow - I wish I had thought of that myself -- thanks, @o1marc!! I got only about an hour to spend on the bus this evening, and got a good chunk of the floor up using this approach. Hopefully tomorrow or the next day I'll get the rest of the plywood up and start tackling the L tracks (the saws-all is at my dad's place currently).

Chris

Tstege 02-22-2019 07:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by o1marc (Post 311266)
Take a circular saw and set it to the depth of the ply wood.Run a line from one end to the other just missing the heads of the screws/nail/bolts holding the ply wood down. Lift up the big pieces of ply and pry whats left from the hardware. You're at one of the funnest parts of the build.


This is how I got my floor up. Took about 2 hours. Then just grind the heads off and there are no holes because the screws stay in

farok 02-23-2019 08:45 PM

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A couple more hours and the old plywood is out! It's such a confidence boost to see the bare metal floor. Of course the next step is dealing with the L Tracks. The saws-all comes back to my house tomorrow, so the next time I get free time, that's the job.

Anyway, I'm very happy to report the only significant rust so far is near the first two windows on the passenger side. Even then, while it doesn't look pretty, it's just surface rust. The rest of the floor is VERY clean (aside from the few holes I made in it in the back that I need to now patch). It's amazing how thin the sheet metal is in this bus - 18 or 20 gauge I would guess. Anyway, patch patch patch, then clean up the rust. Things seem like they're finally starting to progress. Then again, I've not yet started the L-Tracks, knock on wood...

The wheelchair lift is hopefully going away this coming week - it's on a separate piece of plywood so it doesn't fall through that really thin sheet metal floor.

Chris

farok 03-05-2019 08:36 PM

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Just a minor update today as I've had little time to work on the bus lately. My sawzall died (it was on it's last legs anyway), about a quarter of the way through the floor rails. So while waiting for a new one, I started removing inside skin. All the panels have adhesive between them, but a small crowbar pops them out quickly. I also removed the upper handicap rails on each side and some other minor things and cushions. Punch the rivet mandrels out and drill with a 1/4 drill bit... Easy peasy!

When I get the replacement sawzall, I have a diamond tip blade waiting, hoping that'll last longer than the 8-10 bolts the previous Lenox blades were lasting. If anyone has a recommendation on a great blade to cut through 5/16 grade 8 bolts, let me know. Thanks!

farok 03-05-2019 08:37 PM

No I wasn't drunk. My phone appears to be though! I guess I will post from my computer in the future so I can fix images before they are uploaded...

farok 03-07-2019 06:28 PM

No pictures today, but I can say the Lenox 8" diamond blades work great for removing the bolts from those seat tracks!
https://www.lenoxtools.com/pages/dia...aw-blades.aspx

Put a crowbar under the L Track a couple inches before the bolt, then put the blade in and sawzall away. The bolts are popping in under a minute each. I got through 15 tonight before I needed to call it quits for other reasons. The blade is still sharp and going through the bolts as if it was new. The old Lenox bi-metal blades would last 10-15 bolts, but would be noticeably duller after even one or two bolts, so this is a remarkable improvement - worth the $15 for the blade, thankfully. I have high hopes of completing the floor in a few more work sessions. There is light at the end of the tunnel!

Frochevy 03-13-2019 06:51 PM

Keep up the good work! I've been stuck on the floor in mine for awhile. We just had our 3rd child not quite two weeks ago so I haven't been in the bus since Christmas break! The weather is warming up and I plan to get the rest of my plywood pulled up soon as well!! Thanks for all the pictures. It's giving me fuel to work on mine again!

ol trunt 03-13-2019 09:22 PM

Try holding your camera upside down????
Jack:popcorn:

farok 03-14-2019 08:28 AM

No... just standing on my head. :doh:

farok 03-17-2019 06:50 PM

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OK the pictures should be right-side up this time. I'm not posting from my phone again!!

Today was a good day for bus stuff. The wheelchair lift is finally out, the front crossing arm was removed (the one on the bumper), the stop sign from the driver's side was removed, and the two front convex mirrors were removed. That's of course after the FedEx guy backed into one of them and bent it and dented the hood... :confused::banghead::furious:

Anyone want a working stop light and crossing arm?

I also removed the rest of the ceiling panels (that last one in the front was fun!) to find what I suspected may be a leak in the roof. Well the picture speaks for itself... :rolleyes:

The outside roof has a slight rust line down the main seam at the peak that I couldn't inspect when I bout it, and now I know why... better to find it and fix it now, I guess! I'll post separately to ask about that, but any thoughts on the best way to treat the inside?

On the outside, I'm looking at wire wheeling the seam, priming, then applying Dicor self-leveling lap sealant. While I'm up there, I plan to hit any other rivets I can find. I also plan to remove the emergency hatches and butyl tape and lap seal the replacement patches as well (from the ceiling panels).

On the inside, I figured I'd wire brush it (I have a cup brush for the angle grinder I was going to use for the floor), then treat with Ospho, followed by primer. Thoughts?

Chris

farok 03-23-2019 07:13 AM

It's been wet wet wet here, so no progress on the leaks. I do have nearly all the floor rails up, though - 26 bolts to go! This weekend they should all be done!

I was curious if anyone had any thoughts on the Collins body and chair rails, as I'm thinking I'd really like to get the side panels below the windows out to check for water and better insulate. Please see my question over at:
https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f10/co...ons-26211.html

Thanks,
Chris

farok 03-24-2019 07:12 PM

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The floor rails / L Tracks are out!!! Talk about a pain... but I hope to NEVER do that again.

Anyway, I used an angle grinder with wire wheel cup brush to clean up the seam on the top of the bus, then put Ospho on, and will hopefully paint the seam tomorrow night. The following night, seam sealer. We'll see if there's water in it again the next time it rains.

I had water dripping from the driver's sun visor last time it rained, and that has me a bit concerned, but I'm not losing hope yet, as the seam between the roof and fiberglass front panel was definitely taking on water as it was somewhat rusted out as well. Fingers crossed that it might be addressed!

Pictures are before and after the wire wheel on the roofline seam.

Chris

Frochevy 03-24-2019 07:19 PM

I'm going to insulate around my chair rails. I think they do offer a lot of rigidity to my walls as well as I do not want to mess with all of those rivets! Lol I plan to use them to attach some studs to for cabinets and walls as well as I will attach my pivots for the murphy bed.

Good work on your roof seam! As far as a leak up front by the visor, mine was doing the same thing when I picked mine up. I chased the leak around and it was where the support for the mirror bolts to the top of the cab is where mine was leaking (I think) lol. I put some sealant on it and haven't had any water in months. I still have a few window corners leaking tho....

farok 03-24-2019 07:29 PM

Thanks! I'll check the mirror mount to see if that might be it. I'll eventually unbolt it to paint, and I think when I was checking it out for that, the grommet looked a bit dry-rotted. Good call!

Chris

lu6an0 03-25-2019 04:04 PM

Every time I read about what your doing, I'm doing the exact same thing on my bus lol. They are the exact same buses. I chose to just leave the old plywood and brackets on the floor. I stripped the rubber up and patched the few spots where the plywood was rotted. Then just added 1/4" OSB between the rails and 1/2' osb on top to level it out. I'm only using the bus for weekend trips or a couple weeks at a time. At most I'll use the bus 6 weeks a year and never in the cold. Insulation and completely stripping the bus are not necessary. As long as it sealed up good from the rain i'll be happy.

Be sure to check around all the windows since I had 3 or 4 leakers on the bottoms. The way the bottom of the windows seal just doesn't make much sense to me.

I also have a few leaks in the roof seam and the front where the fiberglass meets the metal roof. I'm just waiting for a warmer day to tackle all those.

o1marc 03-25-2019 04:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lu6an0 (Post 316145)
Every time I read about what your doing, I'm doing the exact same thing on my bus lol. They are the exact same buses. I chose to just leave the old plywood and brackets on the floor. I stripped the rubber up and patched the few spots where the plywood was rotted. Then just added 1/4" OSB between the rails and 1/2' osb on top to level it out. I'm only using the bus for weekend trips or a couple weeks at a time. At most I'll use the bus 6 weeks a year and never in the cold. Insulation and completely stripping the bus are not necessary. As long as it sealed up good from the rain i'll be happy.

Be sure to check around all the windows since I had 3 or 4 leakers on the bottoms. The way the bottom of the windows seal just doesn't make much sense to me.

I also have a few leaks in the roof seam and the front where the fiberglass meets the metal roof. I'm just waiting for a warmer day to tackle all those.

Most of the major rust issues on any bus is whats under the plywood. If you have rotted sections of plywood I guarantee there is major rust on the floor. It would not be wise to put any money into something that the base may fall out at any given time. There is a current build here that he is having to replace literally half of the floor due to rust he didn't know about.

farok 03-25-2019 05:05 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by lu6an0 (Post 316145)
Be sure to check around all the windows since I had 3 or 4 leakers on the bottoms. The way the bottom of the windows seal just doesn't make much sense to me.

Thanks - I haven't had the ability to check the windows yet, but will definitely do so! I'm waiting for warmer weather when i can pull/rearrange the windows, and check the panels below (which I'd prefer to leave in place if there's no major damage behind them).

Do you have a preferred method to reseal the windows? I'm thinking butyl tape all the way around, as I suppose the rubber currently used to seal them will be bad by the time the windows come out.

I agree with @o1marc on checking for rust. There was more on this bus than I expected, and quite a bit more in the roof than I expected once the ceiling came down. Today I primed the roof seam that I treated with Ospho yesterday. Tomorrow I hope to run self-leveling lap sealant over the seams to see if that stops the majority of leaks.

On an unrelated note, is there any interest in these old emergency hatches, which will be eliminated once my rivets arrive and I have a little time?

Chris

farok 03-27-2019 01:19 PM

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Dicor self-leveling sealant applied to the seam, a couple holes in the metal, and to all rivets. Now to see if the thing still leaks or not (aside from the fact that the emergency exits haven't been eliminated yet)!

Chris

weboughtabus 03-27-2019 01:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by farok (Post 316502)
Dicor self-leveling sealant applied to the seam, a couple holes in the metal, and to all rivets. Now to see if the thing still leaks or not (aside from the fact that the emergency exits haven't been eliminated yet)!

Chris

Looks good! I'm hoping it's dry inside!

Rovobay 03-27-2019 02:08 PM

roof is looking good! a little TLC goes a long way in waterproofing!

dazdconfsd 03-27-2019 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by farok (Post 315987)
Thanks! I'll check the mirror mount to see if that might be it. I'll eventually unbolt it to paint, and I think when I was checking it out for that, the grommet looked a bit dry-rotted. Good call!

Chris

Both of my Collins have had minor leak issues with that mirror mount to the roof of the cab.

farok 03-27-2019 08:03 PM

Roof Seam Rivets
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by dazdconfsd (Post 316519)
Both of my Collins have had minor leak issues with that mirror mount to the roof of the cab.

Thanks. That makes 3 for 3 on that mirror mount, so I'll tackle that as well. Hopefully I'll hit that before the next rain. I work late tomorrow, so maybe not...

Chris

farok 03-27-2019 08:04 PM

Roof Seam Rivets
 
Thanks for the notes!!

The one thing I noticed on this Collins body is that the roof panels are riveted only once every 6 inches or so along the entire length of the roof peak seam. Has anyone put more rivets in the roof seam to help hold it together? There were a couple spots where there was nearly 1/4" gap between the panels as they "bend" between 2 rivets! No wonder I had some leaks!

I just got my rivets for the emergency hatch removal, and am seriously considering adding more rivets along the seam, maybe even just one between all existing rivets so I have a rivet every 3" instead.

Thoughts?

Chris

farok 03-31-2019 08:08 PM

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It was a productive day today! I ended up deciding to add rivets to the main roof seam, since every time I walk down the roof, the gap between the panels gets worse. The factory rivets are on 7.5" centers, so now the rivets are on 2.5" centers.

I also removed the rear exit hatch and used an inside ceiling panel to cover it. The butyl tape doesn't squish as much as I thought it might, so I found out my rivets aren't long enough, and ran out of the longer ones. More on order. Progress, though! Hopefully the new rivets will arrive before any significant rain, though I can tarp it. Oh and yes I cleaned up the roof before putting the patch on. Once done, I'll prime all the rivets and seal with more lap sealant (as well as the seam, just in case the butyl tape isn't enough).

On a good note, it rained this morning, and aside from a leak at the exit hatch, the floor was dry!

Native 03-31-2019 08:12 PM

Good work, man! :-)

tugboater 04-03-2019 01:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by farok (Post 317231)
On a good note, it rained this morning, and aside from a leak at the exit hatch, the floor was dry!

That's gotta feel good. Nice work!

EastCoastCB 04-03-2019 05:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by farok (Post 316157)
Thanks - I haven't had the ability to check the windows yet, but will definitely do so! I'm waiting for warmer weather when i can pull/rearrange the windows, and check the panels below (which I'd prefer to leave in place if there's no major damage behind them).

Do you have a preferred method to reseal the windows? I'm thinking butyl tape all the way around, as I suppose the rubber currently used to seal them will be bad by the time the windows come out.

I agree with @o1marc on checking for rust. There was more on this bus than I expected, and quite a bit more in the roof than I expected once the ceiling came down. Today I primed the roof seam that I treated with Ospho yesterday. Tomorrow I hope to run self-leveling lap sealant over the seams to see if that stops the majority of leaks.

On an unrelated note, is there any interest in these old emergency hatches, which will be eliminated once my rivets arrive and I have a little time?

Chris

Dicor is good stuff. I used it to seal my roof vent.
For the windows try seam sealer.

farok 04-06-2019 09:59 PM

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Thanks all! Yes it feels good to get a lot of this basic stuff done.

It rained all night last night, and it was dry in the bus this morning! I think I got the leaks!!

Today I removed the second emergency hatch and riveted some steel over the hole. It's primed and when dry tomorrow, it will get some Dicor like the rear one. Just about done with roof fixes!

I think the next project will be to remove the flashers and fiberglass over the holes, then prep and paint the roof. I can almost return to the inside and floor prep again!

I do have a question about the small air vent in the front. It is weather-tight and sealed pretty well. Inside there's no signs of leaks anywhere near it. Are these typically pretty reliable? I'm thinking I may just leave well enough alone and leave it in, but on the inside, just insulate under it like it's not there. Thoughts? I'll post separately about this as well as I know that's probably the better way to get an answer on that.

Chris

EastCoastCB 04-06-2019 10:03 PM

I'd get rid of that passive vent. Its useless.

farok 04-06-2019 10:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EastCoastCB (Post 318407)
I'd get rid of that passive vent. Its useless.

Thanks! I guess another day with the hand-riveter. I was hoping I'd be done with it. :ermm::banghead:

Native 04-07-2019 12:02 AM

I agree with ECCB, especially if you are going to put insulation under it. In that situation, all it is good for is a way to let water in.

tugboater 04-07-2019 11:01 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by farok (Post 318406)
I do have a question about the small air vent in the front. It is weather-tight and sealed pretty well. Inside there's no signs of leaks anywhere near it. Are these typically pretty reliable? Chris

Funny you should ask...I did mine yesterday. Here's what they look like inside if you were curious.:smile: Attachment 31557 Good call on removing it.

EastCoastCB 04-07-2019 11:32 AM

I've got a few of them. Some leak, some don't. But they're useless and they kill thermal efficiency. ALso they pull warm air from the firewall up and make it more uncomfortable.

farok 04-07-2019 07:19 PM

Thanks. Yes it looks like leaks waiting to happen from the pictures. Next day I have some time, that'll be the project. Hopefully the flashers will be next from there!

Chris

Frochevy 04-08-2019 11:28 AM

I have a small round vent that I assume does the same thing as yours does. I think I'll plan on removing it from my roof as well...

farok 04-13-2019 08:04 PM

6 Attachment(s)
Today I had a few hours, and made some good progress. I removed the air vent in the roof to start. It's all riveted on and sealed up, but I didn't get any pictures of that. But, the roof patching is finally done!!

I took the rest of my time today and took a crack at fiberglass for the first time ever. The left eyebrows were removed, the fiberglass ground down to remove the paint and filler that were already there, cleaned with Simple Green, then Acetone, and I was ready to fiberglass. I found that about 1/4 cup of resin is all I can work with at a time before it hardens up on me, so I mixed the resin a number of times. There's probably 6-7 layers of chopped strand mat in each hole, backed with packing tape from the rear. The next day I get, I'll see if I can level it out and if I need to build up any more (or just sand flat and be ready to paint). When I see if I did it right, the left side will get the same treatment.

The rear lights will probably just get a sheet of steel riveted over the holes, with some sealer in-between.

I posted elsewhere, but figured I can ask here as well. I was curious if anyone working on one of these busses has considered removing the front piece of the floor where it comes into the cut-away cab. I'd like to start the living space floor at the bus body, not where it is now. I don't think these channels have any structural value, as they don't seem to be attached in any significant manner to the cab, so I'm thinking I can cut them out. Any thoughts?

Chris

tugboater 04-15-2019 12:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by farok (Post 319803)

I took the rest of my time today and took a crack at fiberglass for the first time ever. When I see if I did it right, the left side will get the same treatment.

Nice progress! Super curious how this turns out for you. Still trying to decide whether to go the fiberglass route or just cover with riveted steel as you mentioned. I've never used fiberglass or bondo myself, but will probably give it a go...my holes up top are much smaller than yours. Please keep us posted!

farok 04-15-2019 08:57 AM

Thanks! It was my first attempt. I think I let the fiberglass resin sit too long, or didn't put enough down, specifically on the second (left) patch, and seem to have air pockets visible. I hope to sand them flat tonight and see what I actually end up with. I have some body filler to level them, as well, if needed (another product I've never used before either). Hopefully more to come tonight or later this week!

From what I gather now, after the fact, one of the keys is when you lay on the chopped strand mat, make sure it's completely saturated with no whitening before putting on the next layer. A fiberglass roller came in immensely handy. See link below for one possible roller (that I'm using). For the holes I'm working with, the round or 2" long flat roller would probably have been easier.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007VQRHJS

Chris

farok 04-19-2019 04:07 PM

3 Attachment(s)
I seem to get only a half hour here, 45 minutes there, so progress is slow. However, I did sand down the fiberglass on both sides, and the first coat of Bondo has been applied and sanded. As you can see, I'm pretty bad (OK really bad) at getting a smooth surface, but I figured as much given my poor spackling ability. However, it's quick to apply and sand down, so I don't mind needing to put a couple coats on to get it more smooth. :whistling:

Let me not bring too much attention to the fact that I forgot how much hardener to put into the fiberglass when I did the passenger side, and I thought it wasn't going to set up... yet it still worked out! :hide:

An auto body shop this is not! Anyway, I just added a second coat of Bondo after these pictures, and hopefully after sanding it after it dries (and the looming rainstorm passes), it should be pretty flat.

While I'm no expert (in fact far, FAR from it), I wouldn't hesitate for anyone to try the fiberglass and Bondo route to cover the holes in the front of the bus if they want it to look pretty decent, maybe even the rear of the bus. For me, though, on the rear I think I'll still just push the "Easy" button and skin over the holes.

Is there a preference to seam sealers to use for skinning over a vertical surface like the rear lights where there's no rain gutter or anything to keep the water off the seam?

Chris

o1marc 04-19-2019 05:44 PM

Skin them from inside and then just the flat hole needs bondoing

farok 04-19-2019 06:27 PM

I like that idea!! Now I'm wondering if VHB tape would work to help make the patch look like it was never there (no rivets or screw holes sticking out)...

Thanks for the idea!

Chris

o1marc 04-19-2019 06:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by farok (Post 320802)
I like that idea!! Now I'm wondering if VHB tape would work to help make the patch look like it was never there (no rivets or screw holes sticking out)...

Thanks for the idea!

Chris

VHB would be too thick. I would use JB Weld or some other epoxy to secure the metal to the back side. At that point the holes don't really need anything else unless you want the circle gone

farok 05-11-2019 09:07 PM

The last month has been quite busy, so bus time has been almost nil. The flasher removal project has gone on hold for now, as I have a need to move some stuff in the bus next month. The focus is on getting the floor (or at least the sub-floor) in place for now.

Today I had most of the day to work on the bus, so I removed the remaining screws in the floor (which was a pain as these are the ones that weren't budging before when the plywood came up), did my best to get the last of the wood removed (splinters and whatnot glued to the floor, also not fun), cleaned the floor, and sprayed on the Ospho. I also removed the remaining bits of insulation from the ceiling, wire wheeled the ceiling rust, and put Ospho on that as well.

If all goes well, I should be able to paint the floor and the rusted ceiling panels this coming week! After that, patch the holes, and onto the floor's insulation and insulation of the subfloor. I'm thinking 1.5" foam followed by 3/4" T&G Advantek flooring. Let's see how the next few weeks treat me...

I'm also still on the lookout for a seat-belted passenger seat. I hope to scour the local junkyards in the next couple weeks as well!

Chris


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