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TheHubbardBus 12-26-2020 12:40 PM

What we did to prep
 
I was so busy prepping I didn't have it in me to take pics at the same time. But we did so much. To include:

1) Every trace of silicone used by prior peeps was removed. Paint hates silicone. I hate silicone. I hate those who used silicone on our bus. But most of all, I hate removing it. The best way we found was to remove as much as possible mechanically, then use xylene and/or contractor-grade adhesive remover to soften it enough to mechanically remove the rest. Any painted surfaces that had silicone on them we sanded down to bare metal after removal, just to be sure it didn't destroy paint adhesion.

2) Every single seam was inspected, cleaned, sanded, grooved (to apply new sealant), and then resealed using 3M 550 FC adhesive / sealant. Every single rivet or screw was inspected, and where necessary, replaced. Thankfully, the sealant used when constructing the cap is compatible with the aforementioned polyurethane sealant I used, so in places where the factory seals were intact (>90%), we simply cleaned & abraded the old sealant, & applied the 3M over the top, & it adhered great. I then went inside and hit every seam again, just as backup if any got through the already-bulletproof exterior. Mr Beefy is officially leak-free, I guar-an-tee.

3) Bondo & sanding primer were used to fill in all the necessary dings, divets, and scratches which couldn't be sanded out. There are a couple dents that would have been nearly impossible to pull out & too big for body filler which we just left. But for the most part we created a clean, flat surface.

4) Multiple power-washings, degreasing with simple green & TSP, etc.

5) Sanding went from 180, to 220, to 320 dry. An orbital was an absolute necessity, but we ended up going over the whole thing by hand w/ 400 grit as the last step, mainly because I had to use it to sand so many curvy areas (hood, front end, etc) that finishing off the flat stuff by hand was no big deal. I originally planned on taking the whole thing down to bare metal, but after testing the adhesion of the factory paint (excellent adhesion), and testing to assure the primer wouldn't lift it, it made more sense not to. Still ended up going to bare metal on roughly 10-20% of the exterior as required.

6) All rubber / trim / lights / etc removed. Front fenders removed. Front door removed. electric panel & battery box doors removed. Windows were already removed. All weatherstrip removed.

TheHubbardBus 12-26-2020 01:00 PM

Paint Time!
 
5 Attachment(s)
Prep was sooooooooooo labor-intensive that once we got to paint, it felt like a cake walk, even though that cake-walk lasted the better part of a week.

Here we are getting ready for the big day(s). We chose Axalta Corlar 2.1 ST for the primer, and Axalta Imron 3.5HG for the paint; both industrial 2-part (catalyzed) coatings. The former is a high-build mastic epoxy, and the latter a high-gloss polyurethane. We chose these coatings based on many factors. We wanted the ultimate in durability, but due to economic, environmental, & safety concerns, weren't able to spray. The aforementioned products are not only tougher than a box of rocks once cured, but also are designed to be applied by brush & roller.

Even without spraying, these coatings - which are isocyanate laden - are quite toxic. 1/2 face respirators w/ organic vapor cartridges are a must. We changed out for new filters at then end of every day (perhaps overkill, perhaps not, but I'm hoping to spend more time in the bus when finished than doctors offices).

TheHubbardBus 12-26-2020 01:17 PM

Paint!
 
6 Attachment(s)
First primer, then paint. The first 3 days were spent priming, the next 3 paint. The paint goes right over the epoxy primer without prep if you stay w/in the recoat window. We never planned on sanding between primer & paint, or between coats of either. Which is good, because the primer, specifically, is not made for it.

EastCoastCB 12-26-2020 01:22 PM

I'm loving this, and you're doing great!

TheHubbardBus 12-26-2020 01:25 PM

Midnight Bayou
 
2 Attachment(s)
Imron in white base was pretty cheap (relatively speaking), so I'm glad the roof was destined to be blanco. But we really wanted a teal-like color for the body. So we hit up Lowes hardware, found a paint card we liked (Midnight Bayou... Gator would be proud), and mailed it over to our online paint supplier. Hazmat fees blow, but not quite as much as trying to source industrial paint locally.

Way back in this thread we posted a photochopped image of our bus as we envisioned it to turn out. The color of that picture is almost a dead-on match for what we achieved. It worked out perfect!

ol trunt 12-26-2020 01:28 PM

Great prep job! Your paint job will last the life of the bus.
Jack:popcorn:

TheHubbardBus 12-26-2020 01:40 PM

Now the fun stuff!
 
6 Attachment(s)
We barely - and I mean barely - got the last bit of paint down before it turned cold & rained, and that lasted a few days. 18-24 hours after the end of the last coat it started coming down. THANKFULLY I don't think it affected the cure (and for this reason, we're also very glad we went w/ a catalyzed paint), but time will tell. From the work I've been doing post-paint, it seems to be just fine. But we haven't torture tested it yet.

But now - we FINALLY get to start installing all the fun stuff we've been sourcing, stocking, & saving up for. Lights, inlets, outlets, horns (hehehehehe), etc.

All lights everywhere were replaced by LEDS. For the rear flashers, we wired the LED replacement reds & ambers into the STT circuits, & swapped out light positions so the turns were the furthest to the sides. The red flashers were only wired as stops, as from what I think I know, they're too high to legally be used as tail lights (they might qualify as 'markers', but I didn't want to get into legal ambiguity, & I can easily change that in the future if warranted). Up front we did the same with the amber flashers, and replaced the Reds with 7" backup lights on a separate switch (yet to be wired) to use as off-road accessory lights.

Since it would have been a bitch to fill in all the holes from the old markers (Weldon 5000) to use new LEDS, we instead replaced the bulbs alone with Philips LEDs, as well as new gaskets for the same. The bulbs work great, but the light distribution leaves something to be desired. Where the incandescent bulbs made the whole light 'shine', the LEDs highlight the bulb, which since it's mounted off-center in the housing, also makes the light source off-center. I don't mind much - but it might bum some people out even more anal retentive than myself.

EastCoastCB 12-26-2020 01:53 PM

Looks great man!

TheHubbardBus 12-26-2020 01:53 PM

The roof, the roof, the roof is on fire!
 
2 Attachment(s)
Poor shot of the roof, standing on our house roof, this is the best shot I can get. Here you can see our roof patches, cable glands (2" lengths of scrap coax used to temporarily seal), newly-installed Maxx fan, and clear hatch. We really wanted to retain the emergency-hatch functionality, but have something we could see through too, so we bit the bullet & bought a clear hatch assembly. A happy coincidence - the tint matches the Maxx Fan almost exactly. It was ordered for the chassis, so the curvature of the roof was already accounted for. Except for swimming in sealant (is it possible to apply this crap without it getting everywhere?), it was a fairly easy job. Sealant used was Sikaflex 201 (a moisture-cured polyurethane like the 550, but much less 'permanent' in nature), which will also likely be used for the side windows.

The 2 black bits are caps on nmo mounts waiting for antennas, as well as a direct mount Sirius XM puck antenna. The clamps in the A/C opening are there just because the sealant's still curing. On either end there are items you can't see... grey tank vent cap to the rear, another cable gland up front.

EastCoastCB 12-26-2020 01:54 PM

I've been shopping around looking at single stage industrial and automotive/fleet coatings. Just can't make up my mind what direction I wana go with that.

TheHubbardBus 12-26-2020 01:57 PM

@EastCoastCB,
@ol trunt,

Thanks so much! Sorry for the rapid-fire posts, but I'm trying to catch up & maybe still have time to get some work in today! Really appreciate the comments.

Up close the paint job would make citrus fruit blush, but that was expected, and for the most part it's consistent. From a few feet away it looks great. With my eyes you don't even need those few feet :)

EastCoastCB 12-26-2020 01:59 PM

all I hope for in painting my bus is to-

make it a color that isn't yellow

Keep it from rusting

look good from 10-20 feet away

last more than a couple years


Where did you source that paint?

TheHubbardBus 12-26-2020 02:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EastCoastCB (Post 419479)
I've been shopping around looking at single stage industrial and automotive/fleet coatings. Just can't make up my mind what direction I wana go with that.



I didn't do any research whatsoever on single stage paints, unfortunately.
You thinking of spray application?
Really wish I could have sprayed. Oh well. It saved more than a few $$ in not-wasted paint. Would have required supplied air otherwise as well.

EastCoastCB 12-26-2020 02:09 PM

I could spray or roll it. Either way.

TheHubbardBus 12-26-2020 02:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EastCoastCB (Post 419481)
all I hope for in painting my bus is to-

make it a color that isn't yellow

Keep it from rusting

look good from 10-20 feet away

last more than a couple years


Where did you source that paint?

Those were our requirements as well, only I wanted it to last much longer than 2 years. I never, ever, ever, want to prep &/or paint a bus again! :biggrin:

Here's where we got it. No idea where they come down on price, as I have nothing to compare it to. I couldn't source Axalta products locally, and the similar industrial PPG products I could have gotten locally, would have cost more than what we got even after hazmat fees.

https://www.johnsonautobodysupply.com

I can say they're very professional, have quick shipping, package their products very well, and matched our color perfectly.

For you or anyone else who might be considering the same products we used, Corlar requires a special thinner for rolling (RT001P), while Imron requires a special additive for the same (don't remember off top of head). Both are specified the in associated TDS. The RT001P was the one thing I had to find from another (online) vendor. They did not package things nearly as well as the biz above, nor were they nearly as professional, which is why I won't include their name here. I feel sorry for the FedEx guy that got to handle that box. Luckily I didn't need the whole gallon.

Oscar1 12-26-2020 02:49 PM

Quality work and great motivation guys!
Keep at it and you'll be on the road in no time.
Big thumbs up.

Oscar

Sevier 12-26-2020 07:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheHubbardBus (Post 419451)
I was so busy prepping I didn't have it in me to take pics at the same time. But we did so much. To include:

1) Every trace of silicone used by prior peeps was removed. Paint hates silicone. I hate silicone. I hate those who used silicone on our bus. But most of all, I hate removing it. The best way we found was to remove as much as possible mechanically, then use xylene and/or contractor-grade adhesive remover to soften it enough to mechanically remove the rest. Any painted surfaces that had silicone on them we sanded down to bare metal after removal, just to be sure it didn't destroy paint adhesion.

2) Every single seam was inspected, cleaned, sanded, grooved (to apply new sealant), and then resealed using 3M 550 FC adhesive / sealant. Every single rivet or screw was inspected, and where necessary, replaced. Thankfully, the sealant used when constructing the cap is compatible with the aforementioned polyurethane sealant I used, so in places where the factory seals were intact (>90%), we simply cleaned & abraded the old sealant, & applied the 3M over the top, & it adhered great. I then went inside and hit every seam again, just as backup if any got through the already-bulletproof exterior. Mr Beefy is officially leak-free, I guar-an-tee.

3) Bondo & sanding primer were used to fill in all the necessary dings, divets, and scratches which couldn't be sanded out. There are a couple dents that would have been nearly impossible to pull out & too big for body filler which we just left. But for the most part we created a clean, flat surface.

4) Multiple power-washings, degreasing with simple green & TSP, etc.

5) Sanding went from 180, to 220, to 320 dry. An orbital was an absolute necessity, but we ended up going over the whole thing by hand w/ 400 grit as the last step, mainly because I had to use it to sand so many curvy areas (hood, front end, etc) that finishing off the flat stuff by hand was no big deal. I originally planned on taking the whole thing down to bare metal, but after testing the adhesion of the factory paint (excellent adhesion), and testing to assure the primer wouldn't lift it, it made more sense not to. Still ended up going to bare metal on roughly 10-20% of the exterior as required.

6) All rubber / trim / lights / etc removed. Front fenders removed. Front door removed. electric panel & battery box doors removed. Windows were already removed. All weatherstrip removed.

This is so impressive! And SO thorough! Despite time consuming, will give you peace of mind. This is exactly our plan. In 28 degree weather, we've gutted our 37' bus, (two trips to the dump necessitated my learning how to drive it :) and are cleaning our windows - it is painful. The bus itself was easy to scrape, and sand, but the window frames themselves are a different story - scraping was damaging the metal, so used goo gone, and it didnt do a thing (not a thing!!) to remove all the sealant. Now we just have slimy nasty toxic windows, and again, doing this for 8 hours in 30 degree weather with slippery chemical gloves and full face respirators on.

So, QUESTION: When you said above removed silicone "mechanically", what were your mechanics? At this point, we will wash all the nasty goo gone off our windows tomorrow (have to boil water on the barn wood stove to add to the freezing hose water to make it warm), and then ... we are stumped. The window frame metal (I assume aluminum) is so sensitive, we are scraping it terribly, which we've surrendered to, and are considering just sanding off the sealant. Anyone have thoughts?

We are in a race to get these windows back in by Monday (1 day from now) because the weather will briefly be a warm 50 degrees, and though we chose a sealant that can work in the cold, we much prefer to do this is warmer weather, much more likely to be more thorough if our fingertips arent frozen.

Sevier 12-26-2020 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheHubbardBus (Post 419415)
@Sevier,

Apologies for the late response. Been absent from forums as of late. I'll shoot you a PM to make sure you see this post.

Yes, degrease and thoroughly clean bare metal, then mechanically abrade. Definitely clean / degrease before or you'll just drive contaminates into the 'pores' of the metal you're creating.

We used both a wire wheel / angle grinder on the well-rusted / flaky / scaled areas, as well as an orbital sander on anything that was still relatively flat. The better you do here the better the adhesion. Just because the ospho will etch the metal doesn't mean thorough mechanical prep isn't much better than ospho alone. Just because they say you don't have to doesn't mean it isn't a really good idea to. We left zero bare metal untouched by grinder or sander.

Lots of controversy & differing opinions on the necessity of removing all ospho, and to an extent it depends on the paint you're using. But no matter what you're using, residual ospho will NOT help anything adhere, and from all the info I've gathered, could very well lead to paint failure. The safest bet is to let it do it's work (it needs to stay wet while working, so don't let it evap.), and then rinse every bit of it away thoroughly with water and get the surface bone dry before priming. A power washer is REALLY helpful here, assuming your bus is gutted to the point you can. Here's the owner of SPI (paint manufacturer) laying down the law, which is the advice I followed, & I'm glad I did.

How to neutralize Ospho | Southern Polyurethanes Forum

FYI, the Klean-Strip ospho you have is exactly what we used, and the MSDS shows it to be pretty much the same composition as ospho-branded phosphoric acid.

I'm actually well-positioned now to comment on the long-term durability of our KBS-coated interior floor, which most people probably don't get the opportunity to do as they often put their wood flooring and/or insulation down right after. COULDN'T BE HAPPIER. We've now been working for months on that floor - which is not yet covered. Sliding bare-metal ladders around, dropping heavy tools, drips & spills from various cleaners & solvents, etc. Constant under-foot flexing (I'm 260#) of weakened areas where rust was heaviest. Yet zero signs of delamination or lifting, and even the 'worst' scratches from the most careless boo-boos (like dropping claw hammers & drills from 6' height) could be buffed out if I cared to. The combination of flexibility + durability is outstanding. When we finally get wood over the top, I'm confident the underlying metal will be protected from further corrosion for years & years to come.

Finally, don't do the fiberglass mesh thing we did. It works - and it's really cool to see just how durable these patches + paint are - but I see now in retrospect it's unnecessarily labor-intensive, and it's easy to leave small voids that require touch-up later. The pennies / construction adhesive bit most people do makes a lot more sense. Sometimes creative solutions are a bad thing lol.

TL;DR:

1) Clean & Degrease thoroughly with water-based cleaner (Simple Green, TSP / TSP sub, etc) and abrasive scrub pads
2) Rinse thoroughly then dry
3) Mechanical abrasion (wire wheel, sanding)
4) Apply ospho liberally, keep wet (by adding more if needed) the entire time until ready to rinse (15-30 mins)
5) Rinse thoroughly, Dry thoroughly
6) Primer / Paint


This is so helpful, thankyou! I feel very encouraged, its so stressful agonizing over the correct approach. Its so important to use that our bus is a healthy bus. And no need to apologize, it looks like youve been busy, and the new paint job looks beautiful! Congrats on getting to this stage!

TheHubbardBus 12-26-2020 08:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sevier (Post 419523)
So, QUESTION: When you said above removed silicone "mechanically", what were your mechanics? At this point, we will wash all the nasty goo gone off our windows tomorrow (have to boil water on the barn wood stove to add to the freezing hose water to make it warm), and then ... we are stumped. The window frame metal (I assume aluminum) is so sensitive, we are scraping it terribly, which we've surrendered to, and are considering just sanding off the sealant. Anyone have thoughts?

@Sevier,

If you're talking about the (steel) frame of the bus, and you're repainting, you can be pretty aggressive. I used a utility knife and/or razor-blade scrapers to get it as close to the surface as possible, and then nylon brushes + a solvent to rough up the film remaining. Once you get to the point where you have to view it on an angle to see the silicone film, solvent plus a rough-textured cotton rag worked pretty well. Then I'd degrease, and finally sand as required for paint. I'm no authority, but I believe if you just try to sand it all off along with the paint in one step, you risk driving silicone into the pores of the metal. It also gums up your sandpaper rendering it useless in short order. Mechanical here means anything that works and won't leave scratches so big they don't come out once you start sanding ;)

If you're talking the aluminum frame of the window, then yeah - you have to be much less aggressive. Anything steel will etch or cut it, as you know. Aluminum wire wheels (hard to find) are an option but nylon 'wire' wheels (like for a drill) seem to work as well or better and won't harm aluminum one bit, and using a drill rather than scraping by hand is a huge time-saver. You'll have to do some stuff by hand, but the less the better. Metal razors & scrapers will shave it like butter so only use plastic equivalents if you're risk-averse. That being said, I know our bus used polyurethane - not silicone - as a sealant, which is also what we're using for reassembly, and that will come off with (relative) ease using solvents such as xylene combined w/ light scrubbing. Pretty easy to figure out if it's not silicone: If xylene dissolves it (wear PPE!), it is not silicone. If the visible portions of your frames are scratched up as you say, and you care, you're past the point of no return, so maybe it's best to just continue sanding working up in grit until you get a finish you like (you could polish them like chrome if that's your style! Boat-load of work though)?. Or sand as required & then paint. If it's the portions that will be invisible once installed, then the scratches shouldn't matter, but I doubt you'd have mentioned them if that was the case.

Good luck! I'm excited for you!

plfking 12-26-2020 08:57 PM

You're taking the time to do it right, and it's showing in spades. Excellent work, and the paint job looks stellar! :thumb:

Frochevy 12-26-2020 10:41 PM

Great job on prep and paint!! Your bus looks great!!! Hopefully in the spring when it starts to warm up we will get our bus painted... It is a post like this that gets me fired up to want to make ours "not yellow"... Anyhow, great work!! And thanks for all of the details!!

TJones 12-26-2020 11:40 PM

Sweet paint job! Imron paint is what my local auto body supply suggested as a durable commercial vehicle paint for my bus.

Ted

Sevier 12-27-2020 06:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheHubbardBus (Post 419529)
@Sevier,

If you're talking about the (steel) frame of the bus, and you're repainting, you can be pretty aggressive. I used a utility knife and/or razor-blade scrapers to get it as close to the surface as possible, and then nylon brushes + a solvent to rough up the film remaining. Once you get to the point where you have to view it on an angle to see the silicone film, solvent plus a rough-textured cotton rag worked pretty well. Then I'd degrease, and finally sand as required for paint. I'm no authority, but I believe if you just try to sand it all off along with the paint in one step, you risk driving silicone into the pores of the metal. It also gums up your sandpaper rendering it useless in short order. Mechanical here means anything that works and won't leave scratches so big they don't come out once you start sanding ;)

If you're talking the aluminum frame of the window, then yeah - you have to be much less aggressive. Anything steel will etch or cut it, as you know. Aluminum wire wheels (hard to find) are an option but nylon 'wire' wheels (like for a drill) seem to work as well or better and won't harm aluminum one bit, and using a drill rather than scraping by hand is a huge time-saver. You'll have to do some stuff by hand, but the less the better. Metal razors & scrapers will shave it like butter so only use plastic equivalents if you're risk-averse. That being said, I know our bus used polyurethane - not silicone - as a sealant, which is also what we're using for reassembly, and that will come off with (relative) ease using solvents such as xylene combined w/ light scrubbing. Pretty easy to figure out if it's not silicone: If xylene dissolves it (wear PPE!), it is not silicone. If the visible portions of your frames are scratched up as you say, and you care, you're past the point of no return, so maybe it's best to just continue sanding working up in grit until you get a finish you like (you could polish them like chrome if that's your style! Boat-load of work though)?. Or sand as required & then paint. If it's the portions that will be invisible once installed, then the scratches shouldn't matter, but I doubt you'd have mentioned them if that was the case.

Good luck! I'm excited for you!

This was so helpful, thankyou! We figured out our routine today (and that there are 4 different sealants on the aluminum window frame, all of which respond differently to different solvents!). Mineral spirits, 3M heavy duty stripping pads, rags, plastic scrapers, nylon wire wheels, nylons scrub brushes, water warmed in a cast iron pot on the wood stove, and full face respirators :) We got it!

Enjoy your newly painted beaut!

Doktari 12-31-2020 06:42 PM

Well done on the paint work. Quality ingredients and prep work are so worth it. I decided to get mine painted in a hurry and am regretting not prepping a little better. Already getting a little peeling in the crevasses I didnít prep well enough. Yes, silicone is hell to remove but I got most of it off. Itís not a valuable bus so it will be interesting to see how long the rattle can spray job lasts. I did pressure wash 3 times and go over most of it with scotchbrite and some of it with a random orbit sander. Went with Spring Green. Enjoy

Sander 01-01-2021 08:16 AM

Spectacular work.

Happy New Year!

TheHubbardBus 01-01-2021 09:04 AM

Sander, Doktari, thanks so much. Yeah, the prep was well worth it, but dang... one heck of a lot of work. Still, it's orders of magnitude less work (and expense) of having to redo a failed job. I do wish we had more experience w/ these products going in. All our minor problems were all aesthetic - orange peel from the primer, irregularities if you catch the light just right from not maintaining a wet edge or rolling back over paint already laid down, and tiny bubbles in the paint. I said I'd never paint this bus again, and for now I mean it, but there may very well come a day I decide to knock down the topcoat & see if we can implement the lessons learned. It sticks & it's durable though, & those were our goals.


And HAPPY NEW YEAR to EVERYONE!!!! 2020 can eat a bag of (insert whatever you want here. Let's keep this family friendly).


https://i.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/...01/826/232/dd4

EastCoastCB 01-01-2021 11:10 AM

Happy New Year, Hubbards!

Frochevy 01-01-2021 11:17 AM

Happy New Year!

Sevier 01-02-2021 07:20 PM

how to clean a bus like yours!?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by TheHubbardBus (Post 419434)
We've been absent from the forums for a while. I'm happy to report it was mostly due to getting stuff done! Lots of progress made, so here's a summary of the past few months:


First, we got the interior paint completed. Our focus was to eliminate any chance of future corrosion while also providing a good primer upon which our future spray-foam will adhere. Product of choice was PPG Amerlock 400, a 2-part epoxy as recommended by a super-helpful PPG industrial rep. It was applied by brush & roller @ ~4 mils DFT. We've been working in the bus for a while now since it cured, including doing plenty to the roof (painted) surface, and we're very pleased with the performance. Prep was extensive, which is the big reason it all worked out so well.

Hello there! Was wondering how you got your bus so incredibly gorgeously clean? It is unreal, how much dirt is on a bus, pounds of just dirt!

We are especially unsure about that little gap on the lower 1/3 of the walls, between the outer wall and the inner wall, where insulation was stuffed (I think I burned more calories ripping out that insulation then I burned pulling out all the seats!). If we power wash back there, will the water drain out? We cant see back there well enough to identify holes. It has got to be vile back there, and leaving behind the kind of mold and grime that lives on this bus for the last 20 years does not lend to a safe and healthy living environment.

Also wondering if you had an effective technique for getting glue off the floor? Unfortunately, we didnt have plywood, just rubber, and so after chiseling the rubber off 220 sq ft, we are now faced with a sea of glue to remove. We've considered Zirconia Flap Disks, Roloc Bristle Disks, regular old wire wheels, elbow grease with degreaser, mineral spirits, and a power washer. When all done with the dirt and glue and grime, will wipe with ammonia and leave some chlorine dioxide bombs in there to be sure we zapped all the germs and mold.

Thankyou!!

Bus'n it 01-02-2021 09:00 PM

Just read through this whole thread! Excellent adventure from start to semi-finished! I don't have much patience for painting my bus and at the same time would like it to look good from 3-5 feet away. For that I am sure it will cost me. Keep up the pictures!

TheHubbardBus 01-02-2021 09:04 PM

@Sevier,

Clean... yeah. That took some doing. And it did NOT happen all at once. We've cleaned the interior more times than I can count, to include blowing out w/ compressed air, vacuuming, scrubbing, power washing... and I kid you not... we STILL find bits of insulation or pockets of crud just about every time we're in there. Like you said - years upon years of nastiness. It seems like every time we'd clean, a fraction of the mess would just relocate to a different spot.

Our exterior wasn't really dirt. The big pain there were all the stickers / silicone / glue.

We purchased a power washer specifically for the bus build, and it's been a Godsend. Definitely one of the most useful tools we've bought thus far.

The gap is one thing we cleaned by hand (covered w/ towels or plastic while washing). Just elbow grease. I didn't use any cleaners because I didn't want to get moisture in somewhere I couldn't easily get it out. Compressed air helped also. Make sure to wear a mask, that stray fiberglass is a nightmare. It's still not what I'd consider clean-clean, but clean enough to fill w/ insulation which is what we'll be doing.

We didn't have any glue, but if we did, I'd probably see if it came up easy w/ a wire wheel since we were using that to prep the floor anyway. On the exterior we did the solvent shuffle on the sticky stuff.



Another very useful tool that's served multiple purposes has been a heat gun. That might help w/ the glue??

musigenesis 01-03-2021 07:06 AM

I regret not giving the inside of my bus a monster power washing at any point. I was irrationally worried about causing further rust damage, which was silly given how many extra drainage holes I had in my floor at the time, and how much water was already coming into the bus on a regular basis.

TheHubbardBus 01-03-2021 10:08 AM

I wouldn't have power-washed your bus either, musigenesis! I'd be afraid it would dissolve before my eyes! :hide:


(I can say this now because of all the awesome work you've done. That's what makes it funny :biggrin:)

Sevier 01-03-2021 07:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by musigenesis (Post 420742)
I regret not giving the inside of my bus a monster power washing at any point. I was irrationally worried about causing further rust damage, which was silly given how many extra drainage holes I had in my floor at the time, and how much water was already coming into the bus on a regular basis.

Ohh Musigenesis, we will all have our regrets/wonderings of why the f*#k we did or didnt do it one way or another! :)

Sevier 01-03-2021 07:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheHubbardBus (Post 420699)
@Sevier,

Clean... yeah. That took some doing. And it did NOT happen all at once. We've cleaned the interior more times than I can count, to include blowing out w/ compressed air, vacuuming, scrubbing, power washing... and I kid you not... we STILL find bits of insulation or pockets of crud just about every time we're in there. Like you said - years upon years of nastiness. It seems like every time we'd clean, a fraction of the mess would just relocate to a different spot.

Our exterior wasn't really dirt. The big pain there were all the stickers / silicone / glue.

We purchased a power washer specifically for the bus build, and it's been a Godsend. Definitely one of the most useful tools we've bought thus far.

The gap is one thing we cleaned by hand (covered w/ towels or plastic while washing). Just elbow grease. I didn't use any cleaners because I didn't want to get moisture in somewhere I couldn't easily get it out. Compressed air helped also. Make sure to wear a mask, that stray fiberglass is a nightmare. It's still not what I'd consider clean-clean, but clean enough to fill w/ insulation which is what we'll be doing.

We didn't have any glue, but if we did, I'd probably see if it came up easy w/ a wire wheel since we were using that to prep the floor anyway. On the exterior we did the solvent shuffle on the sticky stuff.



Another very useful tool that's served multiple purposes has been a heat gun. That might help w/ the glue??


SO helpful, thankyou!!! I feel encouraged, knowing there isnt something wrong with us, or with our bus, it just takes time and multiple cleanings.

We hit the glue covered floor with a power washer (brilliant piece of equipment!), 6 hours, one inch strip after one inch strip, slow and steady. The depth of the glue was significantly reduced, but will still have to sand or wire wheel. They all just seem to smear the glue around, so it will be multiple phases, including the use of more yicky solvents.

The front of the bus is the nastiest bit, but successfully got the entire heater out and all those metal covers over gaps and transmission hole. We just scrubbed and wiped by hand for hours. And those gaps, we'll take a wet/dry vac to them, and, like you, our hands. There are actually slits at the bottom of a number of them, so some water drains, but do not want to leave sitting water, thats for sure.

Before we begin build out, when I think I cant get it any cleaner, we'll also set off some chlorine dioxide bombs.

And yes! We've been wearing full face respirators for 12 straight days - mold and toxic chemicals and who knows what living microbial critters in all that crud - no way!

peakbus 01-03-2021 11:48 PM

Nice work! Have you tried the clear LED lights at night yet? I have been considering the same thing for use in the rear for more backup lighting. Wondered how much light they cast from up there or if LED pods would be better.

TheHubbardBus 01-04-2021 10:02 AM

@peakbus, thanks so much. Please check PMs.

EastCoastCB 01-04-2021 10:22 AM

Bout to start thinking about getting the glue up from our floor.
harsh chemicals sound like the way to go.

TheHubbardBus 01-04-2021 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EastCoastCB (Post 420917)
Bout to start thinking about getting the glue up from our floor.
harsh chemicals sound like the way to go.


So your floor is the same as Sevier's? Just rubber on steel?

IDIaddict 05-14-2021 07:19 PM

What a cliffhanger! I am waiting for the fun interior stuff now!


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