School Bus Conversion Resources

School Bus Conversion Resources (https://www.skoolie.net/forums/)
-   Electrical, Charging and Solar (https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f49/)
-   -   Electrical Help (https://www.skoolie.net/forums/f49/electrical-help-37682.html)

TheOwlSpirit 10-10-2021 02:39 PM

Electrical Help
 
Hi, everyone

I live in Alberta, Canada, where there doesn't seem to be anyone professional willing to help set up electrical and solar in our skoolie build. We haven't even started demo or anything yet, but I have my Sketchup 3D design, and I wanted to have a plumbing and electrical circuit planned out and ready to go before we even remove the first rivet.
Can any of this be planned out and done properly on our own? Electrical is 1000% complicated to me, and I don't understand all the lingo and terms. It's overwhelming and I wish I had some sort of "electrical for dummies" guide for wiring up a school bus.
Has anyone done it without much electrical know-how?

Thanks

Bear Gerschafer 10-10-2021 10:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheOwlSpirit (Post 455713)
Hi, everyone



I live in Alberta, Canada, where there doesn't seem to be anyone professional willing to help set up electrical and solar in our skoolie build. We haven't even started demo or anything yet, but I have my Sketchup 3D design, and I wanted to have a plumbing and electrical circuit planned out and ready to go before we even remove the first rivet.

Can any of this be planned out and done properly on our own? Electrical is 1000% complicated to me, and I don't understand all the lingo and terms. It's overwhelming and I wish I had some sort of "electrical for dummies" guide for wiring up a school bus.

Has anyone done it without much electrical know-how?



Thanks

I knew absolutely nothing when I started our build. We have fully functional electricity with 1000w of solar and approx 375ah battery bank!

You can do it!!!

I used explorist.life guides and faroutride.com explanations along with Will Prowse YouTube videos to get me through.
Kells & Jay (youtubers) have the most straight forward install video i could find, he actually shows his setup and talks about the install a bit.

Again, you can do this! Just read a bunch, find a diagram that works for your needs and buy the parts it requires.
I probably could have saved some $$ parting it out individually, but with no prior knowledge I felt confident buying the explorist.life parts list.

Danjo 10-10-2021 11:25 PM

Thereís a guy named Will Prowse on YouTube that will help you with basics. Thereís some on here that donít agree with him in some respects, but he will run through all the basic equipment and how itís connected. For a few bucks, he even has schematics for simple systems. Once you have a little knowledge from him, thereís forum members here that can help you with specific questions.

TheOwlSpirit 10-12-2021 06:59 PM

Thanks for the encouragement! All of those resources have been teaching me a lot.
How did you calculate your daily usage? A lot of the stuff we want for our skoolie we don't have yet/haven't even picked out yet, so we don't know how to calculate for those holes.

Danjo 10-12-2021 11:30 PM

You need to write your electricity budget. It is the sum of your daily electricity usage. It is best done in a spreadsheet format where each line looks like

Device, Wattage x Hours Used/Day, = WattHours/Day

You then sum these up to get total Watt-hours per day.

The wattage of a device is always listed on the label. You can also get it on a device’s spec sheet.

For 120 Volt devices that will require an inverter to change the voltage from 12 - 120 volts, you’ll need to add the conversion cost of about 15%

It’s hard to figure the energy usage of a fridge. I think it’s something like 10 hours per day, maybe 12.

shaymcquaid 10-15-2021 01:33 PM

Here is the formula I preach:

Cover the top of your bus with panels. Design your system backwards from the panel wattage you can have.

You will never be disappointed in having an excess of power.

Even with 3200 watts on top of my bus, I need more.:oops:

Good Luck

Rock-N-Ruth 10-23-2021 10:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shaymcquaid (Post 456075)
Here is the formula I preach:

Cover the top of your bus with panels. Design your system backwards from the panel wattage you can have.

You will never be disappointed in having an excess of power.

Even with 3200 watts on top of my bus, I need more.:oops:

Good Luck

Amen brother.
We have 12 327W panels on the roof and would love to make it 12 450W panels.

Bon Voyage 10-24-2021 01:35 PM

My 6 Costco lead acid golf cart batteries will run my 12 cubic foot fridge for 2 days before going down to the 50% mark where they need charging. Just to give you an idea.

Rucker 10-24-2021 03:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheOwlSpirit (Post 455713)
Hi, everyone

I live in Alberta, Canada, where there doesn't seem to be anyone professional willing to help set up electrical and solar in our skoolie build. We haven't even started demo or anything yet, but I have my Sketchup 3D design, and I wanted to have a plumbing and electrical circuit planned out and ready to go before we even remove the first rivet.
Can any of this be planned out and done properly on our own? Electrical is 1000% complicated to me, and I don't understand all the lingo and terms. It's overwhelming and I wish I had some sort of "electrical for dummies" guide for wiring up a school bus.
Has anyone done it without much electrical know-how?

Thanks

Youtube Will Prowse and The Offline Garage. Both are geared towards newcomers. Also Freely Roaming has a great intro on building basic systems.

I have been recommending Lithium Ion Phosphate batteries over lead acid.
Lots of discussion here on which might be better, so search this forum for those discussions.

My system is designed for up to four days off grid (though not necessarily in winter conditions). About 500 watts of solar; a 40 Amp Solar Charge Controller; a 2000 watt inverter and a 280 amp hour battery, DIY. I recently upgraded to a 3000 watt inverter but don't use anywhere near that power.

I built my battery following the instructions given in the youtube videos above. Pretty straight forward if you understand basic principles of electricity. You may just want to buy a prebuilt battery-more expensive but suits lots of folks.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:46 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.